Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,965 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,965 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Not simply an excellent album, Chutes Too Narrow is also a powerful testament to pop music's capacity for depth, beauty and expressiveness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Despite its eclecticism and relatively Dadaist leanings, Sung Tongs is a romantic album; romantic in its celebration of innocence and nonsensical shared knowledge, and the sweet, trusted idea that everything will be fine-- as if it hadn't always been.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The most entertaining and lushly melodic work of Morrissey's solo career.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    This is a massive artistic statement from The Microphones, and though it may be cryptic-- even overwhelming at times-- it remains warm and open, thanks to the stunning intimacy that has consistently been the group's hallmark.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    In a Beautiful Place Out in the Country runs like updated material from their majestic 1998 offering, Music has the Right to Children. And like that album's namesake, these five elegantly mournful melodies creep and explore like adored but unruly children, full of wide-eyed astonishment and naïveté.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    This is a solid, intelligent album that a lot of people will love-- one that'll slot onto indie-crossover CD racks right beside the debuts from Interpol, Franz Ferdinand, and the Futureheads.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    It's tempting to think of Art Brut as the foreign replacement for the catchy/clever observances Weezer used to traffic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Deerhoof, an indie band who have released plenty of discombobulated pop and no wave albums, have lately turned toward accessible, foot-stomping rock. It worked on The Runners Four, but it works better and quicker on their new album, Friend Opportunity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    While Cryptograms presents its own obstacles, it's easily enjoyed as a whole. Memorable melodies and an awkward, charismatic narrator are often peeking from behind the dissonance-laden mists that self-consciously choke them.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Kala is clattering, buzzy, and sonically audacious.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Given its fragmented genesis, it's surprising how listenable and of-a-piece Fall Be Kind is.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    [The Merge reissues of Copper, Beaster, and FU:EL] are a wonderfully presented document of a punk legend [Bob Mould], starting over creatively and emotionally in a brief window he helped open, and succeeding beyond his and anyone's expectations.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    With Sunbather, Deafheaven have made one of the biggest albums of the year, one that impresses you with its scale, the way Swans' The Seer did last year.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The test of any conceptual record is how well it stands on its own, removed from the angle. And A Chance to Cut is a Chance to Cure is a first-rate work, even if you're unfamiliar with the backstory.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's the kind of meet-you-halfway hipster party record the Dismemberment Plan has decided they don't want to make anymore.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Abstract, yet brutally honest, Burma shame the transparent, insecure and phony, reminding us that ideals can be standards.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    These are soulful sing-alongs with grit, pop nuggets that hold up to hours of repeat play in humid bumper-to-bumper traffic, and ultimately, the sound of a great songwriter hitting his stride.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Confield promises elegant production, accessibility in moderation, and one of the most enveloping, thought-provoking listening experiences to come forth from leftfield this year.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    How the West Was Won serves up their muscle, sweaty heart and golden grandeur in an exhaustingly persuasive light. That, and a hundred of the best riffs you've ever heard.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Invention has very few peers, in my opinion. Though Schlammpeitzinger's Collected Simple Songs of My Temporary Past and Andrew Coleman's Everything Was Beautiful and Nothing Hurt come close, I'm firmly resigned that I'll not hear a more effortlessly charming album this year.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Beauty and the Beat sounds like a record made by someone who once devoured the catalog and history of his favorite artists, traced their lineage as far back as he could, and has discovered his place in the genealogy. With that enlightenment, Edan is no longer an impersonation of his idols, but one of their peers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Armed with more ideas than should probably be legal, Architecture in Helsinki can't be bothered to dwell for too long on any one of them, and it's this fickle nature that will make you either adore them or deplore them.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This all-star team of Northern European electro-house producers infuses the record with often low, rumbling bass, twitchy synths, and an oddly high-altitude light-headedness-- like floating, high on oxygen, just above a dancefloor.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Though Band of Horses aren't likely to be heralded as trailblazers, they do sound quietly innovative and genuinely refreshing over the course of these 10 sweeping, heart-on-sleeve anthems.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Herbert has outdone himself when it comes to his usual conceptual three-ring circus. But, crucially, this time he's put all that theoretical effort into his most memorable songs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Whereas her last album's smoothed-out eclecticism could be both daunting and empty, The Reminder is equally diverse yet more full-blooded.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Bring any baggage you want to this record, and it still returns nothing but warm, airy, low-gimmick pop, peppy, clever, and yes, unpretentious--four guys who listened to some Afro-pop records, picked up a few nice ideas, and then set about making one of the most refreshing and replayable indie records in recent years.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Released today, it instead feels like a staggering transformation and a return to form that was never lost, an ideal adaptation by a group that many people didn't know they needed to hear again.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Regardless of what kind of audience it ultimately finds, though, In Ghost Colours earns its smiles with a combination of ingenuity and easiness that you don't often come by, and for that, even in April, it already feels like a triumph.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It might seem counterintuitive to call Chemistry a grower: From the first listen, it's both pummeling and riveting.