Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 8,399 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Loveless [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
8399 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The slight nods to accessibility and the decreased stylization might disappoint some of the faithful at first, but Strange Geometry grows more appealing with repeated listening.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The cumulative effect of Shut Up I Am Dreaming surpasses "I'll Believe in Anything"'s ostensible perfection. That's a brilliant song, yes, but this a brilliant album, ballooning with those sorts of moments on repeat.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    These aren't 11 songs so much as 12 blood-riling arguments.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    As menacing as it is hooky, this is some bracing stuff.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    As exhilarating as Fourteen Autumns is at its most anthemic, the vividness of the lyrical themes ultimately carries the record over.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Like those on their last album, these songs reveal themselves gradually but surely, building to the inevitable moment when they hit you in the gut. It's the rare album that gives back whatever you put into it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The Shepherd's Dog is Iron & Wine's most diverse and progressive album yet, a deft transition to a very different sound that explores new territory while preserving the best aspects of Beam's earlier recordings.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Musically, American Gangster is lush and spacious.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    This stripping down and moving away from easily definable mood makes And Their Refinement of the Decline a bit harder to grasp initially than any previous SOTL record.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    As with each of Cox's projects, Let the Blind works best as a swirling, disorienting whole, organizing traditionally abstract styles like graphic-design elements within his unifying vision until they communicate like good pop.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Sounds and ideas repeat constantly, yet Street Horrrsing never feels redundant.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The best executed Harvey Milk album to date, and one of the most accomplished metal records you'll hear this year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Lindstrom knows all the right moves to give his own brand of spacey disco an air of transcendence, but the result feels so effortless that his facsimile and the "real thing" become indistinguishable--a fake so real it's beyond fake.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    It's angry and ferocious, but always triumphant.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The quiet-to-loud dynamics aren't forced, the ahh-ahh backing sighs come at the exact right moments, the church bells on the title track sound like god. These songs are simple, mostly, but they're executed perfectly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Their sources are varied, yet the pleasure isn't recognizing the different sonic elements, but in relishing their almost supernatural co-exist
    • 80 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Simultaneously sparse and rich, The Crying Light mines maximum intensity from a relatively minimal mix of basic melodies, pithy lyrics, and understated arrangements.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Dark Was the Night comes off as a gray, monotone look at the current indie landscape and, as a result, works best in small batches.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    It's a true global-pop album, and a hopeful template for things to come.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Overall, Psychic Chasms is something like a dream collaboration between the Tough Alliance and Atlas Sound, the latter of whose Internet-only Weekend EP shares a delinquent theme with one of Psychic Chasms' best songs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    It's like they've spent the past two years building a bionic version of the band--not only brighter and tighter, but weirder. The group nurtures its eccentricities and the result is a record full of them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    There are a lot of things about Heartland that feel like Pallett is presenting himself more and more fully as an artist; the scope of breadth and mood of it are all grander, more assured, making ever more of a case that the guy shouldn't be viewed as a side note (string arranger for the Arcade Fire, the Pet Shop Boys) or a minor interest.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    There Is Love in You always has just enough going on to pull you back in any time you feel like relegating it to the background. It works best taken whole, rather than broken into individual tracks.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    jj's full-length debut is as easy to enjoy as whatever the last CD was you brought home with a giant cannabis leaf on the cover. They're as naive as they are cynical-- or is it the other stupid way around?-- and they manage to be pretty, touching, funny, and motivating, in different ways, in all the right places, for nine songs lasting 28 minutes.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The bulk of The Suburbs focuses on this quiet desperation borne of compounding the pain of wasting your time as an adult by romanticizing the wasted time of your youth.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    He's sad and pathetic and needy and yet somehow still smooth, which is sort of the central animating paradox at the heart of the Walkmen. They make these wounded, anxious songs, but they make them so confidently, with such unearthly rich-guy assurance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Compared to the last two albums, Zonoscope has precious little guitar crunch, which makes it hard to even call Cut Copy a dance-rock band anymore.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    These spry melodies and generous arrangements are the stuff of pop fantasy, while the reach of Tyler's music offers calling cards for fans of folk and more textural avant garde pieces.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    That idea, the notion of music as a cheapened, battered object, touches nearly every aspect of Ravedeath, 1972, a dark and often claustrophobic record that is arguably Hecker's finest work to date.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    As a first step, both Teenage Hate and Fuck Elvis Here's the Reatards are astonishing. All the energy one could hear in Reatard's better-known work is here in it's rawest, most volatile form.