Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 8,795 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Sticky Fingers [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
8795 music reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Each song on Glasshouse has its own distinct aesthetic; unlike her previous albums, 2012’s Devotion and 2014’s Tough Love, there are no songs here that could be confused for each other, none that seem an afterthought carved from the greater mood of the album.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    It’s an album bursting with ambition, alternating between moments of intimate beauty and stretches of dense, disorienting fog.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Ken
    Like one of Lynch’s filmic worlds, ken is elegant and perverse, a reflection on where we came from, and the unbelievable place we seem to have ended up.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    With 12 songs of nearly equal tone, volume, and length, the nearly hour-long As You Please becomes its own endurance test. When As You Please is taken in smaller chunks, the minor variations between the songs where Citizen churn and the ones where they steamroll ever forward become more discernible.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    Between this spring’s cold, uncompromising Droptopwop and the personable crossover stab of Mr. Davis, Gucci Mane is making his most engaging music since his Trap Back/Trap God resurgence.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever stand out for the precision of their melodies, the streamlined sophistication of their arrangements, and the undercurrent of melancholy that motivates every note.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    As she reimagines the through line of modern-day romance and heartache in jazz, Salvant is at her most versatile and expressive on Dreams and Daggers, choosing songs that wholly capture and embrace the full spectrum that is love—from the initial yearning to the relentless ache and betrayal.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    Airy and danceable, There Is No Love in Fluorescent Light revives our faith in Stars.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Beck has been working on Colors since 2013, and by the sounds of a recent interview, spent a lot of time trying to get the balance of “not retro and not modern” just so. He more or less nailed that bit, but what’s lacking from his Big Happy Pop Record is some kind of strong emotion that could elevate these songs above the “well crafted but innocuous” camp--something more than an idea.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    The songs on Offering are fuller and brighter than they’ve ever been, leaving behind sinister samples and moribund imagery and making good on the promise of uptempo revelry that “Go Outside” offered.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    Masseduction often feels fragmentary, like two or three albums in the campaign of one.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The OOZ drops at our feet like a piece of poisoned fruit, a masterpiece of jaundiced vision from one of the most compelling artists alive.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    Weaves’ ambitious song structures used to be too large to wrangle. With Wide Open, they realize the straightforward tentpoles of pop may suit them after all.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    On Nothing Valley--the first release from Wax Nine, a Carpark Records subsidiary launched by Speedy Ortiz bandleader Sadie Dupuis--Melkbelly reach their hands into pink slime and somehow pull out real nourishment, along the way finding square footing for a mutual next step.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Filled with personal memories, affirmations of self, and gazes of society’s racial strife, HEAVN is a singular mix of clear-eyed optimism and Black girl magic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    Pinewood Smile has got more jokes than ever, and it’s the first time the Darkness don’t evoke 1974 or 1984 so much as 2003--and they’ve never sounded more dated.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    Lyrically, Tenderness can be pretty shallow. If these are songs about disconnection and misunderstanding, the lyrics don’t do a great job of fleshing out the concept. ... Still the warm, well-wrought pop of Tenderness is by far the group’s most enjoyable collection of songs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    This is a lazy-Sunday-hang of a record: cozy, congenial, and only periodically exerting the energy to get off the couch.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More than a continuation of that trajectory, Three Futures feels like a quantum leap. There are more voices, more perspectives.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Cry Cry Cry can be heard as an equal to At Mount Zoomer or Expo 86: a solid record, throwback indie rock by default, powered less by defiant belief than muted reliability.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    On Heaven Upside Down, his 10th album, Manson embraces the tropes that made him a menace and a rock star and a stalwart of goth.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    Unlike her boisterous debut album, it is a calming listen that lends itself to journeys into inner space, even if the lyrics can sometimes be distracting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    On this pristinely preserved live document, the entire underdog-comeback narrative of a Rocky movie plays out and repeats itself in recurring five-minute intervals.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She finds new ways to bring her words to life, backed by a band with more urgency and energy than ever before.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Fatherland is a significantly simplified effort, a work of gentle, singer-songwriter consideration largely haunted by lost loves rendered as exactingly as still lifes.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    Lahey’s songs thrive on idiosyncrasies, not generalities, so it makes sense that sexuality for her would be one part of a person’s character, not the full portrait. Still, while the singer’s first full-length is consistently likable, it is most lovable at its especially individual turns.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    What makes Take Me Apart so stunning is its meticulous attention to detail, with new layers revealing themselves on the third or 37th listen. Its sonorous breadth is mesmerizing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Without sacrificing her ear for detail, she’s engineered an album that sparks a bodily pleasure alongside her music’s continued cerebral delights.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    This valiant yet flawed endeavor feels more like a false start than a dead end, if the Blow keeps watering the ideas seeding the back half and stays away from karaoke.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    On Multi-task they’ve honed their sound to the point where it’s hard to imagine them playing anything that doesn’t take sharp turns or hit abrupt stops.