Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,965 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,965 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album that's full of drama, without the tiresome excess.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    The problem here is that, while the guys are definitely on here, they're still nowhere near groundbreaking, and as a result, they rise and fall depending largely on Karen's delivery.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the album is too top-heavy to be seaworthy, the back end full of Fugazi knockoffs and half a song stretched out to ten minutes in a forced attempt at a showstopping finale.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Phil has moved well beyond the often formless experiments of the early Microphones releases--this is still by no means a record to be digested lightly. And thank goodness for that.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It has a facing-the-beast quality of a punishing spiritual quest, as if Elverum steeled himself and left his house at midnight, barefoot, and just kept walking.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    With Niagara, he's taken strengths from his entire oeuvre to reach deeper into himself and produce what may be his best record yet, one that brings all the fulfillment of noise and transcends them all the same.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Bejar's essential complexity ultimately feels human.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    While some will complain about Boards of Canada's failure to cover new territory, the rest of us will delight in what we see as a very accomplished album packed with great music.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    They manage to cut down some of the weight of the sung pieces, casting them in a more unique light, while giving San Fermin much needed tension and even a bit of violence.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Eschewing pretentious unpretentiousness for unguarded passion, strict 77-82 influences for the classic rock stop on the FM dial, calculated instrumental inadequacy for guitar solos that are less technical flaunting (looking at you, Malkmus) than skillful, noisy exorcisms, Ted Leo makes a sound filled with so much authentic abandon, the British mags probably can't handle it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    While there are a few selection missteps overall, the first disc in particular makes for a great initiation to the Radio Dept.'s previous work. And that there is the opportunity to re-introduce this long undervalued band is something to cheer in itself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Coquelicot, like most Of Montreal albums, is at times sublime and lovely, at times infuriatingly catchy, at times simply infuriating, at times overly twee, and at times seriously fucking scary. What sets this record apart from its predecessors, though, is a level of intricacy and detail that Of Montreal have never previously attained as a band.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They're still doing what they've always done, but Fantasy Empire is the best they've done it in a long time, and the new sheen makes everything seem magic again.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    As immersive and deep as the lake around which it revolves, Meshes of Voice adds a new dimension to the output of both its makers.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rossen brings to this EP the meticulous craftsmanship we've come to expect from his work, but in Silent Hour he's created something rare: a rendering of isolation that feels sincere but never maudlin.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Some of Banks' best lines are elegantly self-aggrandizing and enemy-deflating, but she's just as capable of executing those moves in more straightforward terms.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    It's true that destruction can be an act of creation, but the same goes the other way around: In building, Villalobos, with his big ideas and cheerful disposition, tears down.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Light Up Gold finds Parquet Courts looking to breakout through any available means: intense reflection, resin hits, or rock'n'roll.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    These aren't 11 songs so much as 12 blood-riling arguments.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Invisible Cities serves as something of a breath-catching moment for a band that's taken a giant leap on each of its albums, bringing some of the thunder back while further elaborating on the progress made on Ghost Rock.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a whole, A World Lit Only by Fire represents music converted into motion--kinetic and mechanical, inexorable and inhuman. Godflesh, never a forgiving band, has never sounded so relentless.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What’s Your 20? is for the neophytes--it’s a very reasonable place to start for future generations facing down Wilco’s full catalog on Spotify.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    [A] collection of seven gorgeous, baroque-folk songs.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    A charming batch of stripped-down rock songs that isn't as fully realized or inventive as last year's Guerrilla, but still makes a damned enjoyable listen.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Many slower outfits-- Low, American Music Club, Codeine, et al.-- are sometimes pinned with the theory that if you've heard one of their albums, you've heard them all. Such is no longer the case with the Red House Painters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Sometimes bludgeoning, always regal, Blue Cathedral is a calcified, hippified holy place.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In short, it's fun and functional, yet disposable.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    It continues Björk's run of releases that sound nothing like their predecessors, yet is, as ever, particular to her.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    It's hard not to feel conflicted about Apollo Kids. Unlike Ghostface records that presumably get unfairly judged by the standards of his best work, it's tempting to overrate it due a general relief that he didn't try to make Ghostdini again.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Cancer 4 Cure's closest analogue may be Portishead's Third: the textures and tones are distinctly different from past releases, but it's unimaginable that it could be made by anyone else.