Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,792 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Quarantine The Past
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,792 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    The lyrics are wrung out with the same shaved-down discipline as the music, where nothing ever topples over into over-wrought emoting. Despite this rigid adherence to restraint, much of this material proves to be emotionally affecting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Rips mostly finds the band walking away from Timony's established voice and pushing toward something more direct and energetic--embracing the past, but also blowing things up and starting again.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Pretty Toney far surpasses 2001's Bulletproof Wallets, finally finding the missing link between street cred and commercial respect.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 61 Critic Score
    The more anthemic crowd-pleasing numbers littered throughout The Beginning Stages of the Polyphonic Spree boast such endlessly repeated refrains as "Hey/ It's the Sun/ And it makes me Shine," which lose a lot of their appeal when taken out of their natural habitat (the live setting) and placed between your headphones.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots is a bold and inventive work, brimming with ideas and sublime moments of brilliance. But it's also unfocused and top-heavy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    1966 is one more piece to a puzzle that will never be complete--which is of course how Dalton herself would have had it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    For the first time, Kozelek has put out an album whose meticulous sequencing yields more than just a random scattershot collection of great songs, but rather a complete cohesive musical statement.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The results are as free-wheeling and inspired as the group has sounded in years-- Super-er and Furrier.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    A deliriously ambitious record packed with neo-psych lullabies and swooning choruses.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    Earthless are incredibly indulgent, sometimes to a fault, but they’re much too excitable to be called selfish or masturbatory. The dudes are once again just riffing here. It’s a trip worth taking, at least a few times.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    "Street Horrrsing" was a great record, but Tarot Sport is a cut above. Perhaps surprisingly, it's also a welcoming album--and one of the best of this already fruitful year.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Disbanded in their prime before they grew stale or flat, they still feel pregnant with promise, tantalizingly unfinished; like an actor cut down in youth, they've remained an irresistible lure to the imagination of pop romantics ever since.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Our Love is a very assured record, from its unconventional, austere arrangements to its unrelenting focus and thematic consistency.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    Heavy Ghost is, in Stith's words, "more like life:" sometimes challenging, sometimes confusing, but, in the end, rewarding.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Do Make Say Think have presented us with their best work yet, a varied and unpredictable album capable of imparting the chill of the winter and the warmth of celebratory joy to you without ever presenting you with a human voice.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    Everything is intricately wrought and calculated, perhaps in an overly accommodating response to fears of linearity. This fashionable awareness lends an almost palpable weight to the sound. It succeeds in adding depth and texture to the album, but sometimes overshoots the mark.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The Shepherd's Dog is Iron & Wine's most diverse and progressive album yet, a deft transition to a very different sound that explores new territory while preserving the best aspects of Beam's earlier recordings.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Listen to Multiply once and you'll be struck by how reverent it is; listen to it three times and you'll start to notice the microscopic digital artifacts and subtle tweaks that give it personality and pop.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Electric isn't quite electrifying in the way that Very and Introspective and "What Have I Done To Deserve This?" are, but nearly every track has a moment or two that ignites seemingly long-gone enthusiasm.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    A U R O R A can be heard as Frost’s attempt to create something physical, and it stands above the rest of his discography.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    As was the case with "Popular Demand" and even the split he did with Fat Ray from earlier this year, you get the odd feeling that Milk put his heart into his work, and yet it feels slightly impersonal, save for the career summary 'Long Story Short.'
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Along with the more lived-in sonics, Modern Vampires has the band taking a leap forward into emotional directness. Koenig and Batmanglij truly seem of one mind here, as the vocals and music interact with each other in an effortless flow.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The record is consistently, remarkably strong.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Pulp have pulled off yet another remarkable reinvention of their sound and outlook, while simultaneously making their most organic album since their full-length debut, It, was released almost two decades ago.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    In a bizarre twist, the whole becomes far less than the sum of its parts; less than anything close to a new album, less than even a new EP, and certainly less than Wire has proven themselves capable of.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Cast of Thousands rides the borders of sentimentality expertly-- Elbow's new-found hope in unity may seem like idealistic drivel on paper, but is carried off on record with refreshing determination.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    With an open approach to queer sexuality and radical politics, The Smell of Our Own offers an alternative to the saccharine teen spirit we're so used to sniffing. It's a sensual celebration of stinky, real-life sexuality.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    The riffs are glam-nasty, the lyrics sublimely knuckleheaded, the basslines nimble and bombastic, the mood frivolous and fun and unabashedly corny.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 57 Critic Score
    There's a lot of remarkable music on Celebration--the work of an artist who's spent a quarter-century in a passionate body-lock with the question of what exactly makes pop music popular. She deserves a retrospective more interesting than this haphazard piece of contract-filling product.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Oh No knows just what he's got to work with on this album, and in finding every angle he can for an incredible array of source material, he's made that much more of a case for his own style, too.