Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,925 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,925 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    As was the case with "Popular Demand" and even the split he did with Fat Ray from earlier this year, you get the odd feeling that Milk put his heart into his work, and yet it feels slightly impersonal, save for the career summary 'Long Story Short.'
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Along with the more lived-in sonics, Modern Vampires has the band taking a leap forward into emotional directness. Koenig and Batmanglij truly seem of one mind here, as the vocals and music interact with each other in an effortless flow.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The record is consistently, remarkably strong.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    You have to let your guard down, and Godspeed have to transform feelings into compelling records. They're still on track.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Pulp have pulled off yet another remarkable reinvention of their sound and outlook, while simultaneously making their most organic album since their full-length debut, It, was released almost two decades ago.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    In a bizarre twist, the whole becomes far less than the sum of its parts; less than anything close to a new album, less than even a new EP, and certainly less than Wire has proven themselves capable of.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Cast of Thousands rides the borders of sentimentality expertly-- Elbow's new-found hope in unity may seem like idealistic drivel on paper, but is carried off on record with refreshing determination.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    With an open approach to queer sexuality and radical politics, The Smell of Our Own offers an alternative to the saccharine teen spirit we're so used to sniffing. It's a sensual celebration of stinky, real-life sexuality.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    The riffs are glam-nasty, the lyrics sublimely knuckleheaded, the basslines nimble and bombastic, the mood frivolous and fun and unabashedly corny.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 57 Critic Score
    There's a lot of remarkable music on Celebration--the work of an artist who's spent a quarter-century in a passionate body-lock with the question of what exactly makes pop music popular. She deserves a retrospective more interesting than this haphazard piece of contract-filling product.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Oh No knows just what he's got to work with on this album, and in finding every angle he can for an incredible array of source material, he's made that much more of a case for his own style, too.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    Pinch & Shackleton is a welcome return to each artist's peculiar roots.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    At its core, this is a record about accepting and even embracing the smallness of human life, and how difficult that can be, given our damnably innate sense of adventure, ambition, and restlessness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shellac go straight for your throat and don't loosen their grip until the bitter end.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    This might not be the most inviting sound world to contemplate, but Johannsson's confident touch with it is powerful, and The Miners' Hymns creeps into your consciousness like a musty attic draft.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The Rite should elicit gasps, not cock eyebrows—the latter of which is the most extreme reaction the Bad Plus manage to provoke.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Instead of hiding his bootleg-bred quirks in anticipation of the big-budget spotlight, he distills the myriad metaphors, convulsing flows, and vein-splitting emotions into a commercially gratifying package that's as weird as it wants to be; he eventually finds his guitar but keeps the strumming in check.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    More so than any identifiable influence, More Than Any Other Day is ultimately defined by its unsettled, restless spirit; this is an album that treats panic attacks and adrenalized ecstasy as two sides of the same pounding heart, with its simultaneous transmissions of joy and fear, discipline and chaos, comedy and tragedy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Even though you know just what you should be getting from an album like this, Lee Fields & the Expressions play like the stakes have never been higher: they lay it all out there, put it on the line, and make damn well sure you feel it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    The songs may be catchy, but their intricacy and thoughtful storytelling makes them stick. And for its impressive sonic sheen, the album's skillful restraint makes it sound better with every spin.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The Body's story is just vague and gruesome enough to be weirdly terrifying, totally Orwellian, and grander, louder, and more electrifying than anything the Thermals have spit out before.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    That's just about a half-hour shorter than 22 Dreams, but the disc in turn is twice the fun.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Nixon serves as a reminder that expertly executed stylistic hybrids and ironic juxtapositions-- great though they may be-- don't replace memorable songwriting. Sure, it's a novel concept, but while some of us may still be patient enough to "get it" five albums into the band's career, Wagner's talent and unique vision should demand a more challenging album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Without a doubt, this is Les Savy Fav's defining album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lift Your Skinny Fists like Antennas to Heaven is a massive, achingly beautiful work, alternately elegiac and ferocious. However, Lift plays like an oddly transitional album: much of the first disc presents a refinement of the sound that crystallized on the Slow Riot EP, while the second disc flirts with moments of vertiginous shoegazing, looser rock drumming and reckless crescendos of unalloyed noise. Succinctly, the first disc is easily continuous with their earlier work; the second disc might just be the future.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    To what some chortle is a limited palette, the Clientele adds some new instrumentation-- steel and Spanish guitar, field recordings, violin, chimes-- to create a dense yet rich tapestry of hazy pop, like Felt at their most impressionistic.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Unlike Oldham's best work, The Letting Go doesn't pull you into its own emotional world; it doesn't ask much, and you're free to take as much from it as you'd like.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Though probably not the best UGK album, it might be the strongest illustration of what they do best.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if this is an album that defies obvious lineage and needs a roadmap to uncover the specific sources from Joe Barrite's archive, there's an inescapable sense of emotional impact here.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Read is full of great, idiosyncratic house tracks and Jummy is packed with them.