Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,592 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Led Zeppelin II [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,592 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On Reservation, Angel Haze shows herself to be the rare rapper who has copped a great deal of contemporary popular hip-hop and R&B and come out the other side as purely herself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    The new mastering job, by Frank Arkwright working with Marr, actually is really good: loud but not bomb-level loud, clear, and airy. (Hatful of Hollow, in particular, is dramatically improved from its previous incarnations.) On the other hand, Complete is a profoundly inaccurate description of this set.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I'd assume Bay of Pigs' disco diversion to be just that in the long run, but after the relatively wagon-gathering summary of "Trouble in Dreams," this certainly feels like a break and, perhaps, the first blush of something new. Cheers to that.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    All the more for you to swim around in. And those peaks certainly take you higher when the builds have been teased out to the limit.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Isn't Anything crystallizes MBV's unique dynamic.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    These songs feel less like songs and more like treasures, ones that fill you with power and wisdom, and as a result, Too Bright seems capable of resonating with, comforting, and moving anyone who's ever felt alienated, discriminated against, or "other-ized," regardless of sexual orientation.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Encapsulating and elevating the best of Destroyer's back catalog, Destroyer's Rubies serves as a potent reminder that the intelligence of Bejar's songs has never obfuscated their emotional weight.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    The sparse and largely unobtrusive music, and Jurado’s wanting vocal range place the emphasis on storytelling, one his strongest assets. The results, however, are a mixed bag.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    This isn't the Roots' most accessible album, and it's definitely their most downbeat, but it comes from a place that isn't always easy to dwell.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Rejoicing in the Hands establishes Banhart as a major voice in new folk music. Not only does it improve on the promise of his earlier releases; it effortlessly removes the listener from the context of the recording.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    While undeniably beautiful, Vespertine fails to give electronic music the forward push it received on Björk's preceding albums. Rather than designing sounds never before imagined, the album merely sounds current, relying on the technology of standard studio software and the explorations of the Powerbook elite.... Still, Vespertine makes for an intriguing listen, and manages to hold its own after hours on repeat.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    The most disheartening thing about From a Basement on the Hill is its plainness-- it's neither a perfect record (and not one of Smith's best) nor the kind of colossal disaster that could be angrily pinned on money-hungry handlers and desperate fans.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The Blueprint is possibly the least sonically inventive hip-hop chart topper in years-- stunning and captivating for sure, but still loungily comfortable enough to sleep to.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    The brilliant In Rainbows represents no such thing [downshift]. Nonetheless, it's a very different kind of Radiohead record. Liberated from their self-imposed pressure to innovate, they sound--for the first time in ages--user-friendly.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite the new song structures, guitar solos, and drum fills, Brownstein's guitar still roars wildly, Weiss's drums still thunder, and Tucker still wails with a primal urgency that is one of the most compelling sounds in rock music today.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Spoon's latest is their magnum opus to date; it takes a scalpel to the highlight reel of their career, cutting and pasting a 35-minute tour de force that ends too soon.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tame Impala prove far more exciting because, by maximizing the use of the available technology, they tap into the progressive and experimental spirit of psychedelic rock, and not just the sound.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Per Sunn O)))'s long-standing dogma, "Maximum volume [still] yields maximum results." But this time, there's enough musical range and temperance to usher even the most resolute naysayer into this intricate wonderland.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    As obsessed as Pallbearer is with endings, the music here is timeless.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    There's never a dull moment across AWLWLB's 38 minutes. It's all peaks.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    That Complete Recordings has long gone out of print makes Black Tambourine an essential acquisition for current In the Red, Woodsist, and Slumberland loyalists. And even for old-school adherents, the bonus tracks included warrant a repurchase.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Mellon Collie is a Smashing Pumpkins record that just so happens to be 28 songs in length, stunning in both its stylistic range and overall excellence.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    It would be foolish, however, to think that you could get through a Nick Cave project this ambitious without a few clunkers. At least here Cave's missteps occur when his reach exceeds his grasp, and the songs that fail manage to do so dramatically rather than boringly. [average of scores of 78 for 'Abattoir' and 74 for 'Orpheus']
    • 88 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The Best of Blur serves as a document for an astonishingly consistent career full of hits over in Britain.... As with any retrospective, the track listing isn't going to please anyone.... Still, it's hard to argue with the material that made it to this record. The disc, though not sequenced in chronological order, covers all facets of Blur's career.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The ultimate draw is Antony's voice, and within the first two seconds of the album, it should be very clear to even the most unaware newbies that Antony has an amazing Nina Simone/Brian Ferry/Jimmy Scott vibrato, a multi-octave siren that would sound painfully lovely no matter what he was saying. Lucky for us, he fills that promise with worthy syllables.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fishscale reiterates with cinematic verve that the most vital current Wu Tang Clan member's storytelling can match Biggie's in both excitement and humor. Yet Ghost's songs are unrelenting in their slavishness to density and credibility, and that can turn off casual listeners even as it intoxicates hip-hop purists.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Never before has his music possessed this much majesty, this much command, this much power.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    With all the column inches and message board posts arguing about whether M.I.A. is an opportunist or a clever contextualist, genuine or a fraud, full of good intentions or no specific intentions at all, the closest thing to a truism about Arular is that it's a taut, invigorating distillation of the world's most thrilling music; a celebration of contradictions and aural globalization that recasts the tag "world music" as the ultimate in communicative pop rather than a symbol of condescending piety.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 35 Critic Score
    I'm sure there are kids out there that think Basement Jaxx is great dance music, but the odds are, they don't know much about jungle.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Flying Lotus has the notion that death should be the only limiting factor, and when he's put out a work that wrings beauty out of that very thing, what's the point of fearing anything?