Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 7,147 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Nevermind [20th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
7,147 music reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    The Go-Betweens' endless enthusiasm for their own work is what propelled them out of that Brisbane bedroom in the first place, and the richness of context that this box provides makes it a deeper pleasure than its component albums are on their own.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    Z
    So Z abandons the Skynyrdisms of It Still Moves, but that album's lessons remain intact: Compared to those on previous albums, these tracks have more guitar crunch and tighter song structures.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    St. Vincent continues Clark's run as one of the past decade's most distinct and innovative guitarists, though she's never one to showboat.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sounding like nothing else and answering to nobody but its creators, Run the Jewels 2 is in a class by itself.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    What gives this record its internal order, and makes it stand out over previous laptop explorations of immense record collections, is the simplicity of the other genres that he dabbles and draws upon to flesh out the beat.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    A decade into their career, the Notwist have created a masterpiece by pulling the same trick they pulled on Shrink: mixing things that might not seem to fit together into a beautiful, seamless whole.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    The Avalanches have managed to build a totally unique context for all these sounds, while still allowing each to retain its own distinct flavor. As a result, Since I Left You sounds like nothing else.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A handy 4xCD compilation (disc four a fascinating set of outtakes and unreleased material) that captures the good Captain’s cagey albeit failed move towards mainstream rock acceptance.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The biggest disappointment here is that Modern Times is probably Dylan's least-surprising release in decades-- it's the logical continuation of its predecessor, created with the same band he's been touring with for years, fed from familiar influences, and sprinkled with all the droll, anachronistic bits now long-expected.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    It’s still a Napalm Death record through and through--which means shredded eardrums and tinnitus for days. After all this time, we’d expect nothing less.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Opens with a six-track attack that's rare for any genre, especially contemporary R&B.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    About half of it works reasonably well, though the end result is somehow closer to Low-era Bowie or Eno's Taking Tiger Mountain than anything truly contemporary or avant-garde.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Despite how much better-left-forgotten material is being offered up here as essential, there's still more life in the real Nevermind than anything that's attempted to replicate its attack since.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    M3LL155X (pronounced 'Melissa') builds on her previous work, exploring ideas of dominance and submission and drilling down almost completely into the self. Instead of obfuscating her soft voice with layers of effects or singing in that cartoonishly frail and breathy falsetto, twigs prowls confidently over M3LL155X.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    This set is the document we've been missing of the onstage Family Stone of legend: the tightly knit extended family that sang and played together, the group that magically united black and white audiences. If it doesn't quite live up to their radiant reputation, it comes pretty close.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    Fed
    Plush's vision was obviously reaching beyond his abilities when making this album, and though that's commendable--better to try and fail than not try at all--sometimes you acheive less on the road to greatness.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Fake Train and New Plastic Ideas hold important places in the history of 90s music, not to mention those of punk and indie as a whole. And they set the tone for unimagined Unwound greatness to come (which will be chronicled in subsequent volumes of the box-set series). But those two albums, and the tracks that accompany them on Rat Conspiracy, transcend time, place, attitude, and even the sprawling continuum of influence.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Greenspan... manages to fold elements of nearly a quarter-century of forward-looking pop into a distinct sound without sounding either conceptual or trading on contradictions or the smoke-and-mirrors of attention-grabbing eclecticism.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    "Left Alone" is nothing short of a vocal masterclass. It has the singer going from the verses' rap-like cadence to the hook's curlicue jazz stylings to the operatic long notes of the bridge-- notes that slowly curdle underneath their own exasperated weariness.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 96 Critic Score
    It's of the moment and feels new, but it's also striking in its immediacy and comes across as friendly and welcoming.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    When these guys are on, it truly is the wrath of the righteous. However, Songs for the Deaf vacillates constantly between soaring heights and mind-numbing lows, making for a true hit-or-miss affair.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    We Are Monster has the depth if you have the time. Yep, here's a fun record that's a work-for-it, in-the-details record, too.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 96 Critic Score
    It goes without saying that the Pixies' b-sides don't make for an average, run-of-the-mill outtakes compilation, as many of the songs are almost or equally as radiant as the more fortunate tracks that made it to the five classics between 1987 and 1991.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    You get the feel of two of the world's greatest musicians in a room together, having a conversation and creating a document that will carry their legacy into the future. It is not challenging music. Anyone can approach it easily, and it is the perfect initiation to Touré's talents for listeners who haven't yet heard him.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    High Land is not only his first statement of intent as a songwriter, it’s his most innovative, his most influential, and his most timelessly vivid. Peaking early can be bittersweet, but the album is all the better for it.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    An album that's sonically deep, dark, and one of 2006's finest.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    It's a perfect way into the world of Belle and Sebastian, even if the band spends the second half of the disc trying to redecorate that space.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Amid a musical landscape now splintered into infinite subgenres, Superunknown remains the very definition of no-qualifiers-required rock--a tombstone for a once-dominant aesthetic, perhaps, but also a solid, immovable mass that endures no matter how dramatically its surroundings have changed.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Each of these tracks is indeed summery in its own way, as is most of There’s a Dream. But there’s one thing that neither this collection nor Hazlewood ever forgets: The brightest sun always casts the darkest shade.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The first disc is fine, containing most of the band's singles and a few key album tracks. The second is messier.