Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 8,549 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Metal Box [Super Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 Travistan
Score distribution:
8549 music reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Like all lasting records, Franz Ferdinand steps up to the plate and boldly bangs on the door to stardom. There's no consideration for what trends have just come and gone. There's no waffling or concessions for people who won't get it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    13
    Blur have finally found a sound to match their name.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The canniness of Album's production choices and the scuzzy depression of the lyrics and the gut-level songwriting instincts, along with everything else about the record, add up to something elusive and fascinating--maybe even heartbreaking.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    An album that's sonically deep, dark, and one of 2006's finest.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Above all else, it's the best M83 record yet.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    "Bloom" is also what these 10 songs do, each one starting with the sizzle of a lit fuse and at some fine moment exploding like a firework in slow motion.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Throughout the album, Yorke’s everyday enlightenment is backed by music of expanse and abandon. The guitars sound like pianos, the pianos sound like guitars, and the mixes breathe with pastoral calm.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While there's no question that Grizzly Bear's last two records have sounded gorgeous, critics of the band have wondered if that's enough. Shields, the band's fourth and most compositionally adventurous record, should put those concerns to bed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While Quality may lack the basement charms of [departed producer DJ Hi-]Tek's finest, it more than compensates by employing a funkier and more upbeat sound palate to further draw out the nuances of what is already one of the most rounded and complete rap personas in the game.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Fake Train and New Plastic Ideas hold important places in the history of 90s music, not to mention those of punk and indie as a whole. And they set the tone for unimagined Unwound greatness to come (which will be chronicled in subsequent volumes of the box-set series). But those two albums, and the tracks that accompany them on Rat Conspiracy, transcend time, place, attitude, and even the sprawling continuum of influence.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Without a doubt, this is Les Savy Fav's defining album.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    None of Smith's previous records-- and in fact, very few indie releases this year-- have flat-out rocked like this one, with blaring trumpets signaling snares to exact their force beneath sweeping multitracked vocal choruses that simply won't stop crescendoing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Throughout Cedars, Clearlake continually find beauty in melancholy and melancholy behind beauty, while raising your hairs in reverence with occasional guitar squalls.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Some of the most propulsive, ferocious music of the year as well as some of the most poignant.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For those who've been following along for a few years, this is a groundbreaking record that condenses and amplifies Ariel Pink's most accessible tendencies. But the brilliant thing about Before Today is that no prior knowledge of his catalog is required.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What follows is surprisingly full and wide ranging, almost as much as the Bruegel painting that graces the album's cover.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Along with wry, sometimes melancholic observations worthy of Richman or the Magnetic Fields' Stephin Merritt, these elements make for Lekman's best record, one likely to captivate even those who were skeptical of his previous releases.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    We can only hope that, as we enter the 2010s, Embryonic portends yet another new phase for the Flaming Lips--one that's equally as improbable and rewarding as the ones that have preceded it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An immediately engrossing and challenging collection of moody, evocative songs-- an entire album of "I Want You" and "Watching the Detectives" for those so inclined.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Revisiting All Hail West Texas over two decades into the Mountain Goats’ existence makes a central irony in their story all too clear: it’s not a lonely record anymore. A handful of these songs remain the most iconic in the Mountain Goats catalog.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Feels is an excellent record, one that, despite a more conventional approach, happens to get better over time.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The first three discs of The Smithsonian Folkways Collection are as fine a retrospective as you can find for Lead Belly, showcasing the diversity of his repertoire and the precision of his playing and singing. What distinguishes this collection is its scope.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    We got it from Here... Thank You 4 Your service is all just beats, rhymes, and life. Nothing about this feels like a legacy cash-in; it feels like a legit A Tribe Called Quest album.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    White Blood Cells doesn't veer far from the formula of past White Stripes records; all are tense, sparse and jagged. But it's here that they've finally come into their own, where Jack and Meg White finally seem not only comfortable with the path they've chosen, but practiced, precise and able to convey the deepest sentiment in a single bound.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Here, Clark's role-playing is grounded in emotions that are as cryptic as they are genuine and affecting. And when her voice can't bear it, her guitar does the screaming.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Quality aside, the questionable sequencing of Amnesiac does little to hush the argument that the record is merely a thinly veiled b-sides compilation...
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So simple, so tactile, so deceptively real are these songs. Their cumulative effect is that they become wobbly with metaphor, forcing the listener into the kind of magical thinking that transforms everything in the living world into a sign of the dead, only to snap back into a reality that for better and worse means nothing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sounding like nothing else and answering to nobody but its creators, Run the Jewels 2 is in a class by itself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Each song contains its own small epiphany, but they never quite add up to the one big sweeping epiphany that you'd hope for.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With more developed ideas than Mass Romantic and a more cohesive sound than Electric Version, it's their most consistent, confident, and best album to date.