Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 8,968 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 The SMiLE Sessions
Lowest review score: 0 Liz Phair
Score distribution:
8968 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 71 Critic Score
    Given Ought’s radical inklings, you wish they dared to make these lovely songs say or do something a little more righteous, to twist them into more adventurous shapes. However, Ought achieve this spectacularly on the blue-eyed soul of “Desire.” It towers over Room Inside the World like the album’s lighthouse.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    The album’s a tad awkward, like many projects steeped in the mild tea of sincerity, but By the Way, I Forgive You is the necessary next step in a shrewdly managed career. Brandi Carlile requires no forgiveness from us.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Sir
    The spirit was willing, but the editorial hand, which could have redeemed the project by jettisoning the filler, was weak.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    There is very little happening within his verses right now, and even as he’s pivoted toward the personal, he’s still doing impressions, sonically and stylistically.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    If lacking the conceptual heft of past releases, Wait for Love is a richer, more versatile experience.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    Brighter Wounds, Son Lux’s fifth LP and second since guitarist Rafiq Bhatia and drummer Ian Chang entered the fold, has loftier ambitions than Lott’s prior work.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    The resulting sound feels new, to be sure, but mostly in the sense that it’s not fully ripe. Though challenging and, in its best moments, quite exciting, Music for the Long Emergency ultimately resembles a first draft. Its most compelling ideas are knotted up with its worst, and the whole thing could use a thorough edit.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Twin Fantasy is not a perfect record—the latter half is bogged down by soundscape-y passages and spoken word, for one thing--but that only validates it as a powerful document of teenaged pain and longing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 62 Critic Score
    Chris Dave’s accomplished chops demand that he should be the star of his debut--but too often he’s lost in the firmament.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    Their second album, Rock Island, shows Palm working harder than ever to unburden themselves of the influences heard on those earlier releases, from Slint and Sonic Youth to Battles and Animal Collective.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    The visual [video] gambit falls uneasily between a critique of hip-hop’s relationship with corporate sportswear brands and, once again, a flimsy attempt to muster up attention. Pure Beauty plays out in a similar fashion, committing wholly to neither SHIRT’s appealing raw rap chops nor his grander concepts.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Although the record has a number of aesthetically appealing moments, Dead Start Program never quite coalesces.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 47 Critic Score
    With Crooked Shadows, Carrabba aims to bring together his competing production impulses. Unfortunately, the results are all over the place.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    When Wallumrød emerges from the long shadows of her source material, elevate Go Dig My Grave beyond the beautifully rendered, if rather pointless, collection of covers it sometimes threatens to be.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    His fourth solo album, Transangelic Exodus, is his most thematically cohesive work to date: a loose narrative about supernatural queer lovers on the run from the law. The misfit feelings surging through his back catalog crystallize here into detailed imagery, giving the album a lurid, cinematic sheen.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It’s fitting that this slightly convoluted, sometimes generic offering largely delivers on its promise, much like the larger comic world it now occupies. A fun, rap-centric album is now Marvel canon. In their first roles as bit players, the TDE roster delivers a product benefiting the whole. Their effort is one befitting the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and its blackest entry.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    Beautiful Despair is a rough sketch, and its worth extends only as far as one’s interest in such a document.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    The Two Worlds finds ways to communicate between these modes [fantasy and emotional urgency], interior and exterior, resulting in a portrait that feels full and honest.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If Little Dark Age is a new start, it’s a promising one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Her fifth full-length Air Lows feels like a goth psychedelic ritual intended to plumb the depths of the listener’s unconscious; while the record doesn’t always hit its mark, the moments that do sustain momentum radiate a delectably gnostic hum.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    If their debut fails to offer a consistent, forceful message the way their riot grrrl heroes once did, they have at least figured out how to capture some of those predecessors’ energy. For now, Dream Wife leaves you revved up and ready to go with nowhere suggested.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Pissing Stars feels purposefully small, a personal retreat from full-band compromise by someone who is trying to understand the world and his role in it. The result is indulgent, neurotic, and harrowing, a reminder of the complete mess we’ve made. But it’s oddly reassuring, too.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    The return of synths and disco-ish atmospherics serves, unsurprisingly, to obscure the fact that a nontrivial reinvention still eludes them. But to their credit, Franz Ferdinand are persistently resourceful, and in their theatrical suave and helter-skelter choruses there lingers an obvious knack for starting fires armed only with indie-pop panache.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    Vasquez’s new album, Criminal, batters down the restraints that choked back his voice in the past, letting him break from a whisper into, finally, a scream. If it isn’t his most nuanced record, it’s certainly his most decisive.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    As a standalone suite of songs, like a tuxedo you only dust off every now and then, it is beautiful, but only appropriate when the occasion demands it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    Distinguished by her sure-footed stride, Quit the Curse sounds like an album by an artist who at last knows where she’s going.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    This album often sounds like a studio-crafted simulacrum of a full-band performance, every element a bit too polished.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    The adherence to krautrockin’ repetition remains, but the proto-punk engine has been replaced by electronic loops and glacial synths. Suddenly, a band that once sounded most at home in strobe-lit basement dives now sounds primed for a late-afternoon slot at your roving summer festival of choice.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 41 Critic Score
    On the whole, though, the women Craft expends so much breath obsessing over drift in and out of his songs like cardboard cutouts from a bygone era, there to be lusted after and then blamed when they don’t fit into his fantasy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    It’s easy to indulge a reverie when it’s a vivid one, and Messes invites you to lose track of time for awhile with it.