Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,692 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Isn't Anything [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 0 Liz Phair
Score distribution:
6,692 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Less ferocious, more deliberate but in many ways more compelling, Everything in Between finds No Age matching a new, nuanced approach to their expansive noise.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    he point is that there are lots of people who haven't yet had the occasion to discover Elliott Smith, and ultimately this gives them a chance to scratch away at the bittersweet reality of his work, at how conflicted he sounded, at how bitterly unresolved his career remains, and how every single song still somehow feels like both a confection and a dagger.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Bejar's essential complexity ultimately feels human.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    On Let England Shake, Harvey is not often upfront or forceful; her lyrics, though, are as disturbing as ever.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This unguarded, individualistic expression encourages strong identification in listeners, so don't be surprised if this record earns Garbus a very earnest and intense cult following.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Helplessness Blues' analytical and inquisitive nature never tips into self-indulgence.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's deeply refreshing to hear an artist who exudes such depth and consideration.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's both epilogue and prologue, yet these songs retain their own specific flavor, as R.E.M. map the borders between small clubs and large venues, between underground and mainstream, between rhythm and melody, between outrage and hope. That in-between quality still sounds invigorating so many years later.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This is music that digs deeper and burrows beneath the level of shared associations to discover the sparkling emotional potential of carefully arranged vibrations moving through the air.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This is probably the most uplifting album of his career... Exhilarating.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The duo taps into a power greater than itself to address impossibly vast and elemental topics-- friendship, lust, revenge, art, self-actualization-- with songs every bit as big.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The band's least ornate batch of songs to date builds upon Longstreth's most direct and identifiable lyrics ever. Which means that Dirty Projectors have upped their emotional and structural accessibility all at once.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This album sounds every bit as absurd, chaotic, and exhilarating as it did 14 years ago.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Every sound is lovingly recorded and given a cradle of space.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    If it doesn’t quite show the knack for experimentation and variety hinted at via Inspiration, Wings is a quietly amazing document of Otis’ doggged determination over the quarter century between leaving the business and the first Inspiration reissue.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The record will remain, something that channels the past but sounds like little else right now, an album about rediscovery that's situated in the constantly-shifting present.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Beyoncé seized the powers of a medium characterized by its short attention span to force the world to pay attention. Leave it to the posterchild of convention to brush convention aside and leave both sides feeling victorious.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    They’ve made the first record of their career that feels like it might teach you something over time. It is rare, and special, for a band to be this effortlessly and completely themselves.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The album is loaded with songs whose greatness is revealed slowly, where the simplest, most understated chord change can blow a track wide open and elevate it from simply pretty to absolutely devastating.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The appeal of the Miles at the Fillmore material is obvious: This is an amazing band and they rip, but they never leave traditional ideas of rhythm and melody behind.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Definitely Maybe is the sound of people who feel like they need to scream to be heard—and even then, the chances of anyone actually listening seems depressingly unlikely. And yet, not wholly impossible.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The title of this album is a challenge as well, as How to Dress Well’s modern masterpiece is conducted with the most eternal transparency--Krell asks “what is this heart” and lets you look right into his own.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    LP1
    FKA twigs is not a masterful lyricist, at least not yet; some of her couplets feel clunky, like she's grasping in the dark for rhymes and coming up with the objects closest to hand ("If the flame gets blown out and you shine/ I will know that you cannot be mine"). But when she zeroes in on the essence of a thing, she hits hard.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Ra alights on almost all aspects of its bandleader’s multidimensional sound and presents a coherent trajectory through it, alternating between otherworldly explorations and earthbound beats.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Ruins has a vivid sense of place.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The campy flair, smirking irony, and deliberately "retrolicious" alliteration matches the scarecrow-genius of his new album, Pom Pom.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The weakest of the three versions of Nothing Has Changed is the chronologically sequenced 2xCD version. It's basically just a slight revision of Best of Bowie, compressed to throw in five later songs....The 3xCD Nothing Has Changed, though, is the jewel among the three variations on the same core material. Its masterstroke is that its 59 tracks appear in reverse chronological order.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A handy 4xCD compilation (disc four a fascinating set of outtakes and unreleased material) that captures the good Captain’s cagey albeit failed move towards mainstream rock acceptance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    No matter your feelings on the mic work, though, you can't help but notice the musical talent at play here, be it in the unusual song structures or the unobtrusive, color-adding use of the organ behind Dante DeCaro's unpredictable chords.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The least bullshitting, most accomplished and first consistently great release from Aidan Moffat and Malcolm Middleton.