Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 8,340 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Liquid Swords [The Chess Box]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
8340 music reviews
    • 95 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Lovely Creatures presents the definitive display of these anguished labors and sweet fruits they bore over twenty years--an unmovable feast, immortalized.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Black Messiah pulls together disparate threads few predecessors have had the smarts or audacity to unite.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Definitely Maybe is the sound of people who feel like they need to scream to be heard—and even then, the chances of anyone actually listening seems depressingly unlikely. And yet, not wholly impossible.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Singles offers a wide-ranging but accessible route to his unearthly sounds.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The sequencing shapes the album beautifully, creating a sense of emotional fatigue while only hinting vaguely at redemption. Thematically, however, that cycle implies a romantic fatalism, as though every relationship is doomed to end painfully. That’s what makes Gentlemen at 21 such a compelling and necessary reissue, even if the album has never been terribly hard to find.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This great unknowing serves as the album’s guiding principle. In Cave’s wounded voice, you hear him grapple in real-time with the incidental prophecies of his lyrics and his need to get the job done.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    [The Merge reissues of Copper, Beaster, and FU:EL] are a wonderfully presented document of a punk legend [Bob Mould], starting over creatively and emotionally in a brief window he helped open, and succeeding beyond his and anyone's expectations.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Offering passes that test, it’s both an “important” jazz release and one that’s actually enjoyable to listen to.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    This streamlined set, Start Together, captures that dichotomy, archiving the Sleater-Kinney canon with care: from the ideological-punches of thirdwave feminism to their post-riot grrrl classic rock revisionism, all seven albums have been remastered and paired with a plainly gorgeous hardcover photobook, as well as the surprise of a reunion-launching 7" single.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Dopesmoker is an infinitely explorable listen, the kind of record that will goad your attention through miniscule rabbit holes whether or not you're as stoned as the people who made it.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The struggle between salvation and damnation has rarely sounded so lively or so gloriously conflicted.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The Promise is also a good demonstration of how Springsteen mines his unused songs from material, and shows how many ways he tried to record things before figuring out how they worked best.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With his music and persona both marked by a flawed honesty, Kanye's man-myth dichotomy is at once modern and truly classic.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It is beautiful, emotive music, literally and figuratively entrancing.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This self-fulfilling fatalism is at the heart of innumerable rock songs by innumerable bitter young men, but it is rarely expressed with the introspective clarity that Bachmann displays throughout Icky Mettle.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It remains exceptional because it captured a moment when a premiere showman worked his hardest to win over new fans. Decades later, these 1966 concerts at the Whisky A Go Go still possess the power to convert skeptics so seems that Otis Redding did indeed get his wish: He made one of the greatest albums that ever came out.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the many great things about Liquid Swords is that while it's an unimpeachable work of lyrical mastery, of fierce intellect and sound morals, it's in no way a record for prudes.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Madvillainy is inexhaustibly brilliant, with layer-upon-layer of carefully considered yet immediate hip-hop, forward-thinking but always close to its roots.... Good luck finding a better hip-hop album this year, mainstream, undie, or otherwise.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's both epilogue and prologue, yet these songs retain their own specific flavor, as R.E.M. map the borders between small clubs and large venues, between underground and mainstream, between rhythm and melody, between outrage and hope. That in-between quality still sounds invigorating so many years later.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So simple, so tactile, so deceptively real are these songs. Their cumulative effect is that they become wobbly with metaphor, forcing the listener into the kind of magical thinking that transforms everything in the living world into a sign of the dead, only to snap back into a reality that for better and worse means nothing.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    So while two straight discs of Fela is exhausting, it's probably the most suitable way to digest him.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Box
    Nearly twenty years later, GAS still assaults our presumptions about electronic music.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Of course, Grace Jones is the star here. Five of the original album’s nine songs are covers, though rather than fealty to the source material, Jones sounds as if she’s shredding the songbook with her bare teeth.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Live at Reading effectively grants you side-stage access to the band in their mosh-pit-stoking, drum-set-toppling, putting you as close to the action as the band's mysterious friend Tony, who's seen flailing onstage throughout the show like an epilpetic Bez.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    The result is both the best career-spanning snapshot of and single-purchase introduction to Talking Heads-- odd accolades for a live record-- and a treat for longtime fans.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    The worthy additions in this "super deluxe edition" are nearly all visual.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Though omissions are certain to be an issue for cratedigging obsessives, this collection is as flawless a primer as has ever been made available on a single disc.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Essentially perfect... It remains a landmark that hasn't aged a day.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    A classic tour from start to finish, the set’s only drawbacks owe more to the format than the music: Various incomplete or missing songs, a few over-saturated vocal tracks, five CDs worth of grotty audience tapes, and the fact that Dylan performs nearly the same set lists in nearly the same order at every stop of the tour, from Long Island to Stockholm. Thoroughly consistent, especially by Dylan’s later live standards, the repeated performances from the 22 represented shows might be seen as feature, not a bug.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    By dividing the sessions into what amounts to an overview of his career, My Dusty Road detracts from the recently discovered source material, making it both an incredible find and a missed opportunity.