Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,788 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,788 music reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 28 Critic Score
    Coldplaya-hatas will loathe Keane; most others will just be insulted.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 35 Critic Score
    The edge that sparked Spank Rock's best moments back in the day either isn't there or flails around without direction.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    With their staid textures, the songs tend to blend into one another, sounding at best like a spiritless hodgepodge of About a Boy's weaker moments.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 26 Critic Score
    Peaceful, the World Lays Me Down, the debut LP by the London folk-pop quartet, bites its best sensitive-indie forebears and then pukes up all the most superficial chunks.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Argos is still witty, but here his punchlines tend to be predictable, due in part perhaps to the disc's overstretched answer-song conceit.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 39 Critic Score
    As it is, Peace & Love sounds like a rough draft full of rookie mistakes, rather than a veteran defiantly going it alone.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 39 Critic Score
    Pillowfight is technically flawless but thoroughly unexciting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 27 Critic Score
    All the clichés from French pop and house music collected in one shiny package.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 24 Critic Score
    Do I really wish to describe the pallid piano ballad that is "Judy, Don't You Worry," or the Euro-dance dreck that Cracknell calls "Taking Off for France?" Nico's Liquid Steel remix of "Anymore" adds a modicum of drum-n-bass excitement to the original but not enough to excuse the Vengaboys-for-Uptown-Soirees statement of vacuity, "Penthouse Girl, Basement Boy." How about if I skip the would-be anthemic were-it-not-so-Michael Bolton "How Far?"
    • 60 Metascore
    • 32 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, Seconds, Higgins' first album in 36 years, doesn't match the vitality of its backstory.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 37 Critic Score
    It sadly turns out to be an unsettling piece of evidence that he's lost without someone else's pre-existing sounds to extrapolate from and transform.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 32 Critic Score
    If there's any difference between this album and von Bohlen's lackluster recent output, it's that this collection somehow manages to be even more tepid.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 32 Critic Score
    Spacesettings is liquidated, hookless, and entirely flaccid.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 23 Critic Score
    Ghosthorse and Stillborn tends toward lazy, meandering nothings.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 28 Critic Score
    Yes, Mink Car is crap. All the charms They Might Be Giants once seemed to possess have dissipated into a cloud of embarrassing awkwardness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 28 Critic Score
    They've jettisoned nearly all their Strokes, Television, and other grab bag post-punk propensities, turning instead to adult alternative as a foundation for this late-20s midlife crisis. I guess if ya can't beat 'em, just quit and make soft rock!
    • 60 Metascore
    • 24 Critic Score
    Trilla, Rick Ross's inexplicable second album, is every bit a fatty contemporary American disaster.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Problem is, for the second straight album, they do so with the same exact set of tools as every other band in this sphere. So critiquing Ritual threatens to be a process of listing obvious influences that's just as dull as actually listening to the thing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 35 Critic Score
    The mix here is guitars to 11, everything else to 6, as the slurring, inebriated Liam is buried under mountains of riffs for better and worse.... Familiar to Millions reheats leftovers of better songs written six years ago and force-feeds them as reminders that Oasis could once write an uplifting song. As for those looking for a compact, two-disc set of Oasis' best, it's called What's the Story Morning Glory? and Definitely Maybe-- available for the low price of $8 at your local used record shop.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 35 Critic Score
    Grrr... seems transcribed from a distant memory or read from the pages of a script.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 36 Critic Score
    While the songs certainly do the Whigs no favors, the production and mixing on Dark are downright unconscionable, making one long for the relative restraint of Don Gilmore or Andy Wallace.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 34 Critic Score
    Druggy records are never all that good when they don't convey anything about the experience other than the blur. That's not to say you couldn't get swept up in The Mirror Explodes' churn under the right influence, but it's not something to inspire the formation of many new memories.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Everything about Laugh Now, Cry Later feels utterly tapped of inspiration and vitality, and Cube's former greatness only makes this exhausting slog that much more depressing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 23 Critic Score
    It's as if Primal Scream have run completely out of ideas and so they've reverted to the detestable fallbacks of honking harmonicas and bar-band choogles, acting like college freshmen who just discovered blues.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    No matter what their exteriors, Keane still seem incapable of anything other than the most heavy-handed gestures, peddling the same populist mock uplift that leaves you feeling pushed when it's meant to move.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 37 Critic Score
    It's sort of a catch-22 that Editors can write songs sticky enough to be memorable in unfortunate ways.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    A few good hooks, in fact, would go a considerable way toward redeeming Blank's largely forgettable debut, I Love You.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 37 Critic Score
    Harris reduces pop's limitless possibilities to one-joke self-parody, his youth his most distinguishing characteristic, an unremembered yesterday always more vibrant than today.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 34 Critic Score
    There are a few quality tracks among these 16-- enough for a pretty good EP-- but this is an 80-minute album with at least an hour of stuff on it that sounds at best like studio outtakes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 23 Critic Score
    So this record's creative and artistic value is pretty much nil--in fact it only just hits competent.