Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,546 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 In Utero [20th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,546 music reviews
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    If allowing Jagger to touch up those vocals was the price to pay to allow Exile receive the tribute it deserves, it's still a bargain.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The influence of Pinkerton led to hundreds of mostly regrettable bands, but what ultimately distinguishes Weezer is how they sonically mirror the unhinged and private mental terror of its narrator.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A quarter-century after its first release, London Calling is still the concentrate essence of The Clash's unparalleled fervor.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    For die-hards, the most alluring part of the package may be the second compact disc, which features 18 mostly instrumental demos recorded in Gaye's post-What's Going On honeymoon period, when his vast artistic ambitions and abilities were being embraced by the greater public. These somewhat experimental demos--deep, in-the-pocket funk in the vein of Sly Stone, George Clinton, and Jimi Hendrix--clearly laid the groundwork for much of his subsequent 70s material.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's a colossus of an album, the product of a band that was thinking huge, pushing itself to its limits, and devoted to breaking open its own understanding of what rock music could be.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    At its heart, jazz thrives on bold, sensitive interaction in the moment, and Live in Europe 1967 represents the pinnacle of that practice.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As one of classic rock's foundational albums, it holds up better than any other commercial smash of that ilk.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    If anything, the elucidating peek behind the curtain that Bangs’ documentary provides makes the album feel like an even more singular, remarkable achievement.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Frankly [add-ons would] just be a distraction from the underlying theme that becomes clear once you get absorbed into the music, which is that Blue Lines is still Blue Lines, and most of the world is still trying to catch up to it.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    [Graceland] was unique in its total, and totally natural, synthesis of musical strains that turned out to be not nearly as different from each other as its listeners might have expected, and the result resonated strongly around the world and across generations.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    III is, indirectly, Led Zeppelin’s own version of Pink Floyd's Meddle--the folky, pretty early record that was never too popular and hence a favorite of indie types skeptical of such a massive mainstream band.... III has easily the best bonus material too.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The end result is a great album, albeit one more lighthearted than its myth would suggest.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Van Lear Rose is remarkably bold, celebratory and honest. It's a homecoming for a small-town musician gifted with poise, humor and compassion, but at its very heart, it's happy to be just a kick-ass country record.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Led Zeppelin is one of music's most assured and fully realized debuts; individually, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, and John Bonham were great players, but the whole of their sound somehow exceeded the sum of its parts. But even above the instrumental virtuosity, Led Zeppelin is a triumph of production, each part clear and forceful but adding up to something even more powerful.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    How the West Was Won serves up their muscle, sweaty heart and golden grandeur in an exhaustingly persuasive light. That, and a hundred of the best riffs you've ever heard.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The Little Match Girl Passion is as much a devotional piece as the Bach Passion it is modeled on, and with it, Lang has produced the most profound and emotionally resonant work of his career.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    These four discs ultimately do what any good box set should do: In tracing the band's trajectory from power-pop progenitors to post-pop tinkerers, Keep an Eye on the Sky presents a history of the band that could not be gleaned from the albums themselves, using finished studio tracks along with demos and rarities to give a fuller picture of the musicians, their dynamic, and their songs.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Siamese Dream's songs don't blend into each other, but some transitions exist; each stands out in a brilliant sequence, forming perhaps the best concept album they ever made.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This reissue on luxuriously hefty vinyl is the first time the album's been released in the U.S.--a superb opportunity to hear a record that's been occasionally imitated but never matched.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What's here is brilliant, beautiful, and, most importantly, finally able to stand tall on its own.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The bonus disc is a mildly interesting amalgam of alternate mixes and rough takes--the kind of stuff anyone but the most dedicated obsessives will listen to only once--and there’s little advance here lyrically from the debut, but II is still close to perfect.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Definitely Maybe is the sound of people who feel like they need to scream to be heard—and even then, the chances of anyone actually listening seems depressingly unlikely. And yet, not wholly impossible.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    [The Merge reissues of Copper, Beaster, and FU:EL] are a wonderfully presented document of a punk legend [Bob Mould], starting over creatively and emotionally in a brief window he helped open, and succeeding beyond his and anyone's expectations.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Dopesmoker is an infinitely explorable listen, the kind of record that will goad your attention through miniscule rabbit holes whether or not you're as stoned as the people who made it.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The struggle between salvation and damnation has rarely sounded so lively or so gloriously conflicted.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The Promise is also a good demonstration of how Springsteen mines his unused songs from material, and shows how many ways he tried to record things before figuring out how they worked best.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With his music and persona both marked by a flawed honesty, Kanye's man-myth dichotomy is at once modern and truly classic.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It is beautiful, emotive music, literally and figuratively entrancing.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This self-fulfilling fatalism is at the heart of innumerable rock songs by innumerable bitter young men, but it is rarely expressed with the introspective clarity that Bachmann displays throughout Icky Mettle.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the many great things about Liquid Swords is that while it's an unimpeachable work of lyrical mastery, of fierce intellect and sound morals, it's in no way a record for prudes.