Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,721 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Quarantine The Past
Lowest review score: 0 Liz Phair
Score distribution:
6,721 music reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Home, Like NoPlace Is There is emotionally relentless, but a relentlessly catchy record as well.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As a box set, Higher really does reinforce how creatively rich a band Sly & the Family Stone were, while making it seem almost unbelievable that their peak only lasted seven years and seven albums.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Unto the Locust does fall off a bit toward the end, but that's largely because the first four tracks add up to just under 30 minutes of the most exciting metal you'll hear all year.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    The miracle of this album is how it ties straightforward rap thrills--dazzling lyrical virtuosity, slick quotables, pulverizing beats, star turns from guest rappers--directly to its narrative.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    That Skinner is able to coax so much from a cliché-heavy, 50-minute examination of solipsism and self-pity is a tribute to his ability to reflect and illuminate life's detail.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    It’s still a Napalm Death record through and through--which means shredded eardrums and tinnitus for days. After all this time, we’d expect nothing less.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are no extras, outtakes or re-anythinged. But taking these 10 records in a row, chronologically, it is a striking reminder no single artist has had a run like Joni,
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a real trove, and not just because this lineup is relatively obscure.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Where many concept albums run a high risk of being pompous, cryptic, and self-important, Monáe keeps things playful, lively, and accessible. It's a delicate balancing act, but Monáe and her band pull it off, resulting in an eccentric breakthrough that transcends its novelty.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The Strokes are not deities. Nor are they "brilliant," "awe-inspiring," or "genius." They're a rock band, plain and simple. And if you go into this record expecting nothing more than that, you'll probably be pretty pleased.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If Willner doesn't hit at least some of your pleasure centers, well, forget your ears-- your nerve endings might actually be dead. Even three months in, it's a safe bet that From Here We Go Sublime will wind up 2007's most luxuriant record.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Illinois is huge, a staggering collection of impeccably arranged American tribute songs.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Newbury conceived them specifically as a trilogy examining his own romantic past as well as the country's contentious history, and 40 years later, they sound just as imaginative, evocative, and emotional as ever.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Skinner has an obvious talent for forging damn sharp hip-pop hooks that supercede his inherent verbal handicap.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The album has the particular aliveness of music being created and torn from a group at this very moment--tempered, but with the wild-paced abandon that comes with being caged and then free.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While the rest of pop culture infantilizes itself with cussing puppets and manufactured bands who willfully dangle like marionettes, Waits is serving up vintage brittle fusion and somehow breaking the law of diminishing returns. [Review of both Alice and Blood Money]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Even the least-crucial songs feature a tough backing band and a powerful, raspy performance from Candi.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 97 Critic Score
    So long as we're unable or unwilling to fully recognize the healing aspect of embracing honest emotion in popular music, we will always approach the sincerity of an album like Funeral from a clinical distance. Still, that it's so easy to embrace this album's operatic proclamation of love and redemption speaks to the scope of The Arcade Fire's vision.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    It's angry and ferocious, but always triumphant.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    It’s challenging, then, to appreciate the boldness of No Depression, the extent to which the members of Uncle Tupelo insisted on interdependency, on an American story. We don’t have to do that anymore--folks don’t self-identify in the same way, and hardly anyone loves just one genre monogamously--but there’s still something furious and prideful here, something worth hearing.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The new version is in fact more textured and nuanced, but not at the expense of the album's bone-dry, brutalizing crunch. Most of its touch-ups are tastefully unobtrusive and illuminating.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    On Sir Lucious Left Foot, Big Boi does something even more difficult: He gives us a great album that sounds nothing like any of the great albums he's already given us. From where I'm sitting, that's an even greater achievement.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Top-heavy with sad string passages and mournful vocal loops, Untrue is an album meant to be heard at home, in the car, on headphones-- his songs feel almost like beautiful secrets being whispered to a listener.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Primal Scream have always understood the power of a groove and a lyrical grenade. Their entire career reaches a melting point on the raw, caustic Exterminator.... The album has its shortcomings. "Keep Your Faith" and "Insect Royalty" dip a bit too much into the more sentimental song-based style of the last record, Vanishing Point, and "Swastika Eyes" needs no reprise. But the fighting spirit keeps Primal Scream ahead of the pack.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    On Spaces there's a power that Frahm hasn't always been able to capture in his recorded work. But the overriding feel is one of joy at listening to a performer demonstrating the infinite elasticity of sound.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    Z
    So Z abandons the Skynyrdisms of It Still Moves, but that album's lessons remain intact: Compared to those on previous albums, these tracks have more guitar crunch and tighter song structures.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    St. Vincent continues Clark's run as one of the past decade's most distinct and innovative guitarists, though she's never one to showboat.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sounding like nothing else and answering to nobody but its creators, Run the Jewels 2 is in a class by itself.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    What gives this record its internal order, and makes it stand out over previous laptop explorations of immense record collections, is the simplicity of the other genres that he dabbles and draws upon to flesh out the beat.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    A decade into their career, the Notwist have created a masterpiece by pulling the same trick they pulled on Shrink: mixing things that might not seem to fit together into a beautiful, seamless whole.