Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,923 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,923 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    It finds the band climbing toward some unknown peak, and while it attains great heights, there's also a now-again sound of wheels spinning, and every reason to believe LB still haven't reached their ultimate destination.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Like Ghostface's modern classic, this album defies hip-hop's current atmosphere of youthful cockiness and aging complacency: instead, it's driven by the sometimes celebratory, sometimes traumatized sense of stubborn survival and perseverance, a veteran mindset that can no longer picture success without having to defend it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    You don't get anything that great [as "1777"] on the rest of the album; that said, it's an emotional peak you only need to reach once on a collection like this, and the restraint on the following tracks helps with the overall thematic.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Each song contains its own small epiphany, but they never quite add up to the one big sweeping epiphany that you'd hope for.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    An exceedingly triumphant psych-pop oddity.... I doubt 2004 will birth a more blissful sonic encounter than Ta Det Lugnt.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Though it draws upon the distant past, Julia Holter's made a timeless people-watching soundtrack: an acutely felt ode to the mysteries of a million passersby, all the stars of their own silent musicals.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    For all his indulgences, Waits never lingers too long; these tracks are concise and expertly edited, and Bad as Me feels as new as it does ancient.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    From the first shudder of the keyboard and crack of drums to that last, celebratory walk through the village of the virgins, Iyer, Crump and Gilmore keep things spellbinding.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Yes, this is shit-hot thrilling music. But it's also brainy and ambivalent, and more engaging for it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    In the end, Barnett returns invariably to herself, a subject she finds hard enough to understand. If all this seems a little heady in discussion, it's to the credit of Barnett and her band--Dave Mudie, Dan Luscombe, and Bones Sloane--that it doesn't sound that way on record.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Maybe that's why this album has such an incredible pull: It doesn't make an atmosphere so much as a space to spend time in, and Adebimpe doesn't become a narrator so much as a witness.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Because Up in Flames is so focused on big moments and aural candy, it's wise that Snaith decided to keep the record under 40 minutes. He blows you out and then packs it up.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    On her fifth solo release, Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea, she may be maturing, or more vulnerable, or more vulnerable to her maturity. But regardless, the sheen gets slicker and her music gets duller as the time passes.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On Reservation, Angel Haze shows herself to be the rare rapper who has copped a great deal of contemporary popular hip-hop and R&B and come out the other side as purely herself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    The new mastering job, by Frank Arkwright working with Marr, actually is really good: loud but not bomb-level loud, clear, and airy. (Hatful of Hollow, in particular, is dramatically improved from its previous incarnations.) On the other hand, Complete is a profoundly inaccurate description of this set.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I'd assume Bay of Pigs' disco diversion to be just that in the long run, but after the relatively wagon-gathering summary of "Trouble in Dreams," this certainly feels like a break and, perhaps, the first blush of something new. Cheers to that.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    All the more for you to swim around in. And those peaks certainly take you higher when the builds have been teased out to the limit.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Isn't Anything crystallizes MBV's unique dynamic.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Encapsulating and elevating the best of Destroyer's back catalog, Destroyer's Rubies serves as a potent reminder that the intelligence of Bejar's songs has never obfuscated their emotional weight.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    The sparse and largely unobtrusive music, and Jurado’s wanting vocal range place the emphasis on storytelling, one his strongest assets. The results, however, are a mixed bag.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 96 Critic Score
    What makes Painful so eminently approachable after all these years is that it manages to sound like a fully realized, band-defining statement yet unpretentiously off-the-cuff at the same time. It’s a feeling reinforced by the overflow of material available on this reissue.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    This isn't the Roots' most accessible album, and it's definitely their most downbeat, but it comes from a place that isn't always easy to dwell.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Rejoicing in the Hands establishes Banhart as a major voice in new folk music. Not only does it improve on the promise of his earlier releases; it effortlessly removes the listener from the context of the recording.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    While undeniably beautiful, Vespertine fails to give electronic music the forward push it received on Björk's preceding albums. Rather than designing sounds never before imagined, the album merely sounds current, relying on the technology of standard studio software and the explorations of the Powerbook elite.... Still, Vespertine makes for an intriguing listen, and manages to hold its own after hours on repeat.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    The most disheartening thing about From a Basement on the Hill is its plainness-- it's neither a perfect record (and not one of Smith's best) nor the kind of colossal disaster that could be angrily pinned on money-hungry handlers and desperate fans.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The Blueprint is possibly the least sonically inventive hip-hop chart topper in years-- stunning and captivating for sure, but still loungily comfortable enough to sleep to.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    The brilliant In Rainbows represents no such thing [downshift]. Nonetheless, it's a very different kind of Radiohead record. Liberated from their self-imposed pressure to innovate, they sound--for the first time in ages--user-friendly.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite the new song structures, guitar solos, and drum fills, Brownstein's guitar still roars wildly, Weiss's drums still thunder, and Tucker still wails with a primal urgency that is one of the most compelling sounds in rock music today.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Spoon's latest is their magnum opus to date; it takes a scalpel to the highlight reel of their career, cutting and pasting a 35-minute tour de force that ends too soon.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tame Impala prove far more exciting because, by maximizing the use of the available technology, they tap into the progressive and experimental spirit of psychedelic rock, and not just the sound.