Polygon's Scores

  • Games
For 493 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Persona 4 Golden
Lowest review score: 10 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 493
493 game reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are some really pleasant components in Gat Out of Hell, but they never gel into something cohesive and worthwhile.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Zeno Clash 2 is frustrating in its failure to capitalize on its own potential. It crafts a wonderful, weird, engaging world but wastes most of your time in it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The original setting and folklore-heavy background have a lot of potential, but the game gives up halfway through, content with repeating same-y areas and no longer building on the mechanics. There's nothing very incredible about that.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    What little content is here doesn't reach the heights that it should. I can't remember the last time an otherwise superb game was betrayed so completely by a single mechanic. Instead of making the whole of Mario Tennis Open about strategically countering your opponent's volleys – a system which is fully and brilliantly implemented – Camelot has made it an afterthought.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The self-effacing jokes reveal Hell Yeah!'s biggest secret: It knows that it could do better. And so do I.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The bad pacing in level design, the overwhelming mix of things to do without any sense of how to piece them together into a strong experience, the production values that veer back and forth between fantastic and non-existent — it feels like, well, a PlayStation 2 game.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Bringing a more casual racing audience into your franchise by blending arcade and simulation elements is a fine goal, but when it's done with a jackhammer instead of a scalpel, bad things happen. Dirt Showdown still contains the brilliant driving mechanics of its ancestors, but it's hampered by half-baked design decisions at every turn.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A child would almost certainly find themselves too frustrated to finish it, and an adult determined to muscle their way through isn't likely to be engaged by the world or story.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Occasionally awkward controls and convoluted map design aside, it accomplishes the goal of seeming like a big, fun, explosion-packed, AAA shooter. But that's it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The challenge isn't a surprise; years of dungeon crawling have built up my tolerance for difficult, slow-paced first-person RPGs. But Unchained Blades' great leveling system and sharp dungeon design clash with its old-school leanings and badly-developed attempts at mixing up the formula.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At least it no longer plays or looks like an experiment gone wrong.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Retro City Rampage is like a trifle, one sugary layer upon layer upon layer. It's incredibly sweet and delicious, but the longer time you spend with the thing, the more the sugary goodness mashes into one consistent and familiar flavor -- not as great as any one of its individual parts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In small, small bites, Wreckateer's chaos is infrequent enough to be relatively inoffensive. It's actually well-suited for a party game, as its score-chasing design and habit of overstaying its welcome are built for frequent turn-passing. But trying to storm through a few dozen castles in one, single-player session is an invitation for dismay, because in Wreckateer, repetition isn't education - it's punishment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Disney games from the '90s weren't just great because they featured characters we'd all seen on the big screen - they also had a unique weight and gameplay loop to them, a feeling Power of Illusion recreates perfectly. But its misguided desire to also be an Epic Mickey game betrays that earnestness around every corner.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    How do you not love a game that wants so desperately to delight? Well, you fight the camera through the whole scene. You summon the wrong weapon at a climactic moment. You hear the umpteenth joke fall flat. And so on.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Feels shoehorned onto the console. It's mind-numbingly repetitive and doesn't add enough to the series' formula to justify the platform shift. Scribblenauts Unlimited is more Scribblenauts. More players. More words. More puzzles. But more is not better.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's amusing more than ever really funny (it thankfully avoids the gratingly desperate irreverence of Gilbert's DeathSpank), and it's self-congratulatory about its own darkness, which - in the grand scheme of things - is still fairly tame.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Amid the Ruins [is] a major step back from the series' normally high standards. I can only hope Telltale shakes off the rust for a stunning conclusion to the second season, but it has a long way to go.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I'm not one to complain about games being too short very often, but A City Sleeps doesn't allow itself enough breathing room to fully explore its own central concept.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Hohokum is the prime example of a game whose beauty is truly skin deep. It sure is lovely to look at, and if that's all you want, you won't be disappointed. There's just not much under the surface.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Etrian Odyssey has never needed deeper or more developed plot, and the new parts of Millenium Girl are the least interesting ones. If you've played past games, there's little reason to jump into this latest entry — exploration is a lot less enticing when it's terrain you've already mapped before.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The tight competitive multiplayer experience is a ray of hope in what's otherwise a rather depressing package. Campaign mode downplays the wide-eyed humor that was once the soul of the series, diluting it with a stressful, poorly balanced tower defense clone.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a gorgeous, dark and bloody tableau. But all that visual beauty and dramatic gravitas goes to waste with an aimless plot and a monotonous combat system. Ryse has all the guts of next-gen — often quite literally — but none of the glory.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Tales of Xilla 2 is a house built on a solid foundation with a rotting roof. It takes the best elements of the first game — thrilling battles and a fun, quirky cast — and drags them down by gating off content in a way that felt insulting to my time.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all its noble efforts to the contrary, Liberation still feels like a second-rate handheld port where it counts.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I'm happy that TERA discards the elements that make combat so tedious in other MMOs, but I wish it was bold enough to attempt to fix the many other shortcomings of the genre.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Its genuinely funny moments are powered by insightful perspective on gaming's many cliches, yet it does very little with that knowledge, settling for shallow, repetitive gameplay.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As just another game, Destiny is a confusing combination of often at-odds elements — it presents itself as ambitious, almost boastful, while seeming strangely safe and reserved. It wants to eat its cake as a shooter, and have the longevity of an MMO — but it lacks the combat sophistication of the former, and the deep well of content native to the latter.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The moments of payoff come too infrequently to make plodding through another three dozen frustrating enemies any less tedious.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There have been many worse Spider-Man games than this. But I can't recall one that's swung so conceptually close to greatness only to let poor execution drag it back to Earth.

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