PopMatters' Scores

  • TV
  • Music
For 8,114 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Bootleg Series, Vol. 12: The Best of the Cutting Edge 1965-1966
Lowest review score: 0 Travistan
Score distribution:
8114 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album proves itself to be what we all thought Radiohead couldn’t make again: a masterpiece.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A record that sounds as if it would be very much at home on any AOR radio station in the 1970s.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is fresh, original, and points the way.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With 23 discs to sort through what matters most is the main album cuts and not the odds and ends unique to this box with one exception: a 1980 recording from Woodstock, New York titled Wild in Woodstock. Recorded in a studio up there with the understanding that the band would add crowd noises later, this “live” album retains the best Isley sensibilities for the stage.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Meticulously choppy and frequently free of inherent genre boundaries, it's an askew masterpiece of brains, brawn, heart, and soul.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It imparts that expansive happiness of catchy songs just at the margins of your memory, not quite in your grasp, a reminder of the pleasure of music, something beyond yourself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With nearly three dozen guest musicians chipping in, the aptly titled Monoliths and Dimensions is far and away the band’s most ambitious project to date, but typically, the many guest contributions are so subtly performed and arranged, not to mention entirely in keeping with O’Malley’s and Anderson’s collective vision, that we hardly notice.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's sad for Ford's memory, but lucky for us: Harlan County remains a solitary delight, away and apart, to itself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The musicians on this compilation are a testament to the creativity, dynamism and exuberance of the Haitian people.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If there are any faults on Foundations of Burden, it’s that the middle portion of the album tends to succumb to a sameness sound, which is almost inevitable when you have two 10-minute plus tracks back to back. Fortunately, the demand for subsequent listens is hardly a laborious task, given Brett Campbell’s stellar, sustained vocal delivery.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All We Love We Leave Behind is proof positive that the incandescent flame of Converge's fury is fully under their direct control, and because of this ability to harness their elemental power, the Converge of 2012 sound just as fearless and peerless as ever.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In the fiercely competitive pop world, the coalescence of earworm melodies, lush production, and dynamic performances is usually the unlikely result of an ensemble effort of high-salaried professionals; alone, Boucher beats them at their own game and then some with one of the most rebellious, uncommonly bizarre records of the young post-modern pop era.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Black Tambourine is indispensable listening for anyone with even a passing interest in indie pop's past or current renaissance and a wholly welcome reminder of the unwavering greatness of one of the genre's truly seminal bands.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This massive re-release of what is arguably the Pumpkins' crowning achievement lives up to the lofty heights set up by the original album: it's sprawling, ambitious, overlong, frustrating, and fascinating all at once.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So fresh, so revelatory, so alive.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fishscale owes a large part of its success to Ghostface’s vivid storytelling.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Cadillactica stands on its own as a deviation in sound but a continuation of greatness. An intriguing concept, exceptional production, and captivating lyricism ensure that a trip to Cadillactica is one that will stick with you for life.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's an accessible album, but one containing challenging contrasts. In the end, what's most impressive is how Arulpragasam powerfully weaves a consistent theme of rootlessness throughout the record, drawing on her experiences in both the third world and modern London, from civil war to Western urban culture, and her own, highly unique, bastardized form of pop music is the extraordinary end result.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    You’re Dead! is arguably his most imposing album thus far.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tokumaru’s music, it’s now well established, is quirky but profound, foreign but still universal.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Bon Iver defiantly makes a small-scale statement on For Emma, Forever Ago, so much that if you don’t concentrate, you’ll pass this over.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The new album doesn’t have the political commentary that we saw on those two [Childish Things (2005) and Just Us Kids (2008)], but it’s likely we’re going to see Complicated Game on the nominee list come next year. It’s that good.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unwound plays with a tightness and richness that few bands can touch anymore; they have turned into the metal Minutemen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    That Fleet Foxes have crafted such a sublime debut less than two years into their existence as a band speaks to their collective pop genius .
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Baroness simply lets the songs do their thing, never beating us over the head, never pandering, and in so doing, they’ve created a surprisingly adventurous album, further establishing their position as one of the finest, not to mention likeable bands in America these days.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The most sonically satisfying statement to emerge yet from the Collective.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    That level of "realness", the way that the songs ring true whether he's bragging or self-criticizing, joking or praying, is what makes The College Dropout more than worthy of all of the attention that it's getting.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What Something More Than Free does best is confirm that Isbell is a rare talent, one who doesn’t need a major life event to inspire him to make great music.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s a good album, but not a great one, and though the long tail of history will eventually render such a long production time moot, it’s certainly not a record justifying the ludicrous wait.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Silent Movies is able to take all of the disparate descriptions above and press them into one unifying album. Marc Ribot really ought to have the opportunity to score films more often, because the results can be breathtaking.