Prefix Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,104 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Icky Mettle [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 10 Eat Me, Drink Me
Score distribution:
2,104 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    However, like so many singular artists, Wyatt's presence spans the record and ultimately gives it its necessary gel. His multi-octave voice booms, croons, and cracks across the album with stunning clarity and consistency.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    There's No Home offers a rewarding finish as a slow syncopation turns to an eerie final verse featuring Jana and John and Matthew Brownlie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Ghostface's beat selection is impeccable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Full of simmering restraint, Jukebox sounds lived-in and genuine, less a genre experiment than full fledged statement.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Five Roses is far from mere homage. This is the work of a precocious and incredibly ambitious songwriter who is playfully navigating the history of pop music.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Seventh Tree ultimately may have club-happy "Supernature" devotees shaking their heads, but for those of us who cherish all things weird and wonderful in the land of Goldfrapp, it is a welcome (and much-needed) return to form.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Santogold is sure to be one of the year’s best albums, with only one near-miss (“My Superman”), an album that may become unavoidable in coming weeks and months.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Arm’s Way represents a step forward from "Return to the Sea" creatively if not as an artistic whole.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Playing up his role as elder statesman, Green gets away with delivering the familiar back-in-the-day sermon because listeners expect it from an icon of the past. However, by infusing such consistent gentleness throughout the entire record, he pulls off the unthinkable in the early 21st century--a momentary respite.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Smilers proves Aimee Mann still has plenty to offer doing the same thing she's already been doing for the last fifteen years.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    With its out-of-this-world visions and lines like “Floating off the edge of the ocean/Out into the galaxy,” Dystopia gives listeners the urge to escape to distant lands.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Tha Carter III soars because of Wayne’s to-date under-appreciated ability to turn himself down.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    LP3
    It is the most realized of their albums to date, and it showcases the group fully exploring the possibilities of the niche that they created for themselves two records ago.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Like the return of Portishead and My Bloody Valentine, Leila’s reemergence is another welcome surprise in a year that’s been full of them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    You won’t hear anything on The Rhumb Line you haven’t heard before, but that doesn’t prevent it from being one of the year’s best debuts.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Moody Motorcycle is a deft reappropriation and re-imagining of the harmonic pop of the Everly Brothers, Simon and Garfunkel, and Crosby, Stills, and Nash.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Right now, I can’t think of a better album to listen to after having a shitty day. Glasvegas is a masterpiece of modern miscreant malaise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The songs never sound cluttered despite the cavalcade of divergent sounds that make up the album, and Pearson’s vocals are adeptly deployed as just another instrument.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The music may not always be easily accessible, but it is almost always interesting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Offend Maggie’s mellowness is not a lessening of Deerhoof’s strangeness. In fact, the emotional intensity of these songs may be even more pronounced than in songs from the past.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The conviction in Stern's direct, bare voice is what turns the album into the kicking, clawing, emotional frenzy that we get.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Molina has created a genre all her own, and Un Dia is its pièce de résistance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    [Pfeffer] pruned this album to an essential thirty-two minutes, in which every note (and there are a lot of them) has its purpose and every bizarre genre switch leads somewhere important and ends before wearing out its welcome.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    It's rare to find a band with such breadth of vision, and although indie kids might balk at Saint Dymphna's shameless embrace of the dance floor, the rest of us will be lost in its agitated reverie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    This semi-collective sound-making only adds to the expansiveness of the band’s gestures.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    They owe nothing to a far-gone musical moment, nor can they be pigeonholed. Limbo, Panto may be one of 2008’s most startlingly great debuts.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Easily the most exhilarating rock 'n' roll record to emerge in 2008.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The largely successful results characterize a risky proposition that in the hands of talent and artistic focus has yielded all sorts of adventurous delights.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Although The Cross Of My Calling ostensibly provides an outlet for the band’s Marxist ideologies, its impeccable musicianship, arrangement and production make any political sloganeering irrelevant.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Tronic isn’t quite hip-hop’s "Smile," but Black Milk is certainly open to pushing similar boundaries of possibility.