Prefix Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,104 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Modern Times
Lowest review score: 10 Necessary Evil
Score distribution:
2104 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Real Life Is No Cool is essentially all pop structures. It's maybe an accident that Lindstrøm and Christabelle's project so successfully feels like something hip and modern, like a photograph hung in a museum or cut from an obscure magazine that's suddenly become part of the landscape.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It helps that Teen Dream, Beach House's third album, is the best thing the band has done. Legrand and her bandmate, Alex Scally, have been ready for a homerun shot since 2006's selt-titled debut, and they cracked this one into the stratosphere.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Have One on Me isn't at all a ploy for greater likability. It's an affecting, indulgent, and thoroughly fleshed-out monument to Newsom's considerable ambition.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Under Great White Northern Lights is a perfect explanation of the band's significance to doubters, now and in the future.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What makes Marling engaging is that her music presents scenarios without deliberately sounding like poetry or art. Her songs do not emphasize the beauty of sounds or musicality of words so much as clip insightful observations from conversations.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    From its painstaking production to its dense lyrical constructs to its mammoth choruses, High Violet is likely to be one of the year's best.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a great record, full with a daring, hard-earned hope, and a deep emotion. And that's something a lot of records could really use these days.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty isn't just an expertly produced and performed slab of brilliantly odd, futuristic dance music. It isn't just the best rap album of the year so far.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's part of the final duality that makes The Way Out a success: learning how it was constructed is fascinating, but it's equally enthralling to go into it completely ignorant.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Album of the Year stands as one of 2010's most innovative and adventurous albums of any stripe, incorporating traces of African jazz, latin music, psych, metal, and more in its relentless attack. It bangs hard from start to finish, and it's guaranteed to send producers scrambling to rerecord their drums in its wake.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Public Strain improves on Women in every way, which is no small feat. It's 13 minutes long than its predecessor, but Women doesn't use the extra time to spread out. The band keeps the tension up by building the various lean sounds of that record into new, more muscular variations.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Each pass cements that Stevens has done the impossible yet again: He's released another album that's both genre-defining and genre-defying.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In 2010, when oversharing is the norm, Pinkerton can seem almost quaint for its willingness to hold back. All told, it's roughly 10 percent as confessional as the average overheated Tumblr post or Gareth Campesino! lyric sheet. Maybe that's why, to this day, "El Scorcho" is still the sort of song that lonely teenage boys vigorously lip-synch to when they think that nobody's looking. Its lyrics can be vague enough ("I'm a lot like you...") to fit all sorts of specific yearning.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If there's ever been an advertisement for allowing bands to develop before they blow up, Native Speaker is it. You'll probably listen to more immediate albums this year, but few will have the down-the-rabbit-hole quality that marks Native Speaker for success.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Cape Dory is not the kind of album that heralds the emergence of some great new talent, necessarily. It just does what it set out to do, and it does so perfectly.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A noticeable departure on Kiss Each Other Clean is that Beam seems to be having a genuinely good time on the album.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As expected, the album's highlights are its patient explorations.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If there's one thing made clear by the satisfying catharsis and musical quantum leap of In And Out Of Youth And Lightness, it's that Patterson should ignore his earlier advice more often if it results in albums of this caliber.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The beautifully (which is to say, lightly) remastered album, and the warts 'n all bonus disc shows us just how good of a band Sebadoh were, and why they became far more than just the band Barlow started after he left Dinosaur Jr.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This time around, Zomby isn't constraining himself. This record sounds big.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Wild Flag is the creator of an absurdly good album, one of the most vital of 2011. Wild Flag is not a supergroup. They are a super group.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With less of the anxiety that marked his earlier albums, that world is a joy to get lost in over and over.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Its power and poise never ceases for 90 wonderful minutes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In 2006, it seemed like Beach House couldn't outlive Beach House. In 2012, Bloom is the bar to clear.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's his finest work yet, which is saying something, and the kind of record that will resonate for years not just because it's reveres history, but because it understands it and isn't afraid to demand answers from it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    You can see every angle and every side of the shape they've made. And the unimpeachable logic of each song, added to their odd tunefulness of the songs, makes them exciting to listen to.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the most satisfying, a nearly unclassifiable mammoth of sound that manages to weave brutality, atmosphere, and aching melody into a body-enveloping cocoon that sticks around longer than the average Hollywood movie.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tame Impala possesses an uncanny ear for reconstructing psychedelia that spans decades while remaining undeniably present.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Though the narratives are harder to follow, and the refrains more verbose (or simply absent), this music is still full of youthful anger. The nature of it is simply more suitable for a recent-high-school-graduate-aged kid grappling with more knotty insecurities. It’s also probable that much of Earl’s younger audience has grown up with him, and will relate to this impressive record even more deeply than his first.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Bleak, distant, polarizing, and beautiful, Wolfe’s fourth album makes a gargantuan impact.