Pretty Much Amazing's Scores

  • Music
For 456 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Art Angels
Lowest review score: 0 Xscape
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 19 out of 456
456 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With Cilvia Demo, Rashad proves his place in the Californian crew’s lauded lineup, and TDE show their own versatility on the cusp of hip hop takeover.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With each album Real Estate has sharpened this process, making Atlas both immediately recognizable and their most interesting album to date.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Ørsted’s debut LP wears its history heavily, composed of equal parts previously released and new material. It is a risk for an artist as dependent on earworm shock value as Ørsted, but a deliberate one that yield dividends at the end of the day.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s nerves are uneasy, but Lost in the Dream stands as Granduciel’s most open-armed record yet, filled to the gills with selfdom and sprawling musicality.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As the trio continue to remould and refine their craft, Mess, an album fuelled by impulse, demonstrates their ideological core hasn’t moved an inch.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    My Krazy Life is in essence a retooling of GKMC, and YG comes out, unexpectedly, as a talented and believable vessel for the story that the album tells to express itself.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    ingles is sometimes stark, and sometimes surprising – but its key constant is that it’s rarely short of spellbinding.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s a record that boasts glaring maturity without diminishing the iconic immaturity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s Album Time is a lock-tight demonstration of how crucial time is in the cultivation process. As a result, Todd Terje curated one of the most enjoyable albums that will cross our desk this year.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s a heartfelt, narcotic odyssey through the seductive pleasures of lava lamps and black light posters, a kind of escapism that comes in the same strange, silk-screened colors as the novelty lighters and t-shirts one might find at a backwoods southwestern gas station.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Food is consistently satisfying and often fabulous.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    El Camino was the sound of The Black Keys flexing their muscles as they reached for that sword, but Turn Blue is the sound of The Black Keys baring their soul and testing the parameters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    They may be a conflicted bunch, but boy, do they ever make a magnificent racket.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Folks will either freak out over this album or abhor its very existence, and that is exactly what makes it so good.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Throughout In Conflict, Pallett opens up his compositions even more than his lyrics, but the songwriting is no less brainy, and themes no less tangled, than on his earlier work.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    On The Moon Rang Like a Bell, Hundred Waters offers an album of quiet moments of subtlety juxtaposed with crashing waves of desperation.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Throughout, Showalter comes over like a visionary risk-taker with nothing to lose, not to mention like a consummate frontman.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The band may love the sounds of Built to Spill and Superchunk a little too much, but they’re also far too adventurous to settle for apery, least of all on LOSE. It’s their best work yet.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    On Green Language, we witness risks. We listen anxiously as Rustie bets a Brinks truck on his emotional wherewithal, and that bet pays out exponentially.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Favorite records tend to draw us back in again and again because they offer a specific, familiar feeling, yet it remains difficult to rate, categorize or even define an album as restlessly mutable as ­Mr Twin Sister.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Plowing Into the Field of Love is a great record which only has one song on it that really sounds like the Gun Club, or like anything you would want to play over the trailer of The Hateful Eight.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    RTJ2 isn’t quite the game-changer The Money Store was, but it makes no attempt to hide its desire to knock its progenitors out cold and scamper off with the crown.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Bundick’s inspirations run rampant across the back half of Michael.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Punk is alive, but it just needs a second to squeeze drops of Visine into its eyes before it can bust out ferocious riffs and sing about nothing, or stick it to the status quo but maintain Austin, Texas levels of weirdness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    There are no wasted notes, no wasted time, and nothing but the impulse to listen again.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Her complete dominance over the sonic space of her debut reinforces Broke With Expensive Taste as a product singularly of her vision.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Seeds isn’t TV on the Radio’s strongest album, but it is a radiant reboot, a move forward and a reason to move.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Not dance music in any traditional sense of the world, Faith In Strangers has injected itself into a crowded conversation on originality alone.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Sucker’s greatest musical weapon is Aitchison’s voice--a posh, melodramatic caterwaul that will encourage either adoration or virulent hatred for all of its full-throated, Union Jack swagger.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s frequently arrestingly beautiful (“Selfish Gene”) or driven nearly wild with joy (raucous party-starter “Mr Noah”), but always with a visceral, off-kilter kick where Panda Bear’s last pair of full-lengths opted for heavenly effervescence or communal transcendence.