Q Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 5,789 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Reveal
Lowest review score: 0 Gemstones
Score distribution:
5,789 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Admittedly Maas is hardly reinventing the wheel here, but there's a freshness and pace that's been missing too long. [Mar 2002, p.126]
    • Q Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This most recalls their masterful Through The Trees, only with pedal steel, banjo, bowed saw and some of their best harmony vocals yet. [Oct 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fortunately, Elliott and Timbaland's idea of old school is rather unorthodox. [Jan 2003, p.121]
    • Q Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [A] measured and thoughtful set of intelligent pop tunes. [Oct 2003, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An astonishing reassertion of relevance for Plant. [July 2002, p.118]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beautiful stuff: sunny with a sad undertow, like The Beach Boys, Beck and The Beatles put in a blender. [Nov 2003, p.110]
    • Q Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    OST
    Showcas[es] [Shields'] typically speaker-buckling white noise. [Nov 2003, p.126]
    • Q Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A superb piece of work. [Apr 2002, p.117]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At times, he thinks as laterally as Pavement's Stephen Malkmus. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fannypack might already be sick of the Beastie Boys comparisons, but it works on too may levels to be ignored. [Oct 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A rare treat, with Jones' stripped-back, largely acoustic band brilliantly framing that voice... [Nov. 2000, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If a brace of previous albums hinted at genre-defying transcendence, Obrigado Saudade attains it. [Mar 2004, p.107]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This genuinely feels like a fresh start rather than time-killing. [Mar 2003, p.100]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Almost classic Green. [Jan 2004, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Finisterre distills their Mellotrons, strummed guitars and electronic beats to a fine essence. [Oct 2002, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result glitters like diamond.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Finds his muse back in rudest health after the relative disappointment of Rock N Roll. [Feb 2004, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Coy, genail and funny... a potent antidote to the usual chill-out porridge. [#184, p.140]
    • Q Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Superior to both the last two Mode albums and [Martin] Gore's recent solo effort, Counterfeit 2. [Jul 2003, p.103]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Few bands epitomise so well the virtues of not fixing that which isn't broken.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Admittedly, her FM-friendly singalongs aren't rocket science, just fantastically effective. [May 2003, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is the quieter songs, like the beautiful Throwing Stones, that make this record the most charming Rubin has produced since Donovan's comeback. [May 2003, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Part 1's eight deluxe country rock essays all impress. [Feb 2004, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their debut album's secret arsenal comprises frontman Chris Martin's voice - prematurely aged for someone in their early twenties - and some supple, persuasive melodies. That and a great big side order of melancholy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is one glaring drawback: so taboo-shredding are her lyrics, and so brutal her music, that she probably won't achieve the clout to which she obviously aspires. [Oct 2003, p.99]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's some indication of Feast of Wire's accomplished evocation of Arizona's old weirdness that it makes you want to go to Tucson. [Mar 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What on paper sounds like an awkward hotch-potch, actually makes for an hugely enticing, fluid record.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not only do Kannberg’s vocals sound more robust than previously, but the whole record has considerably more colour in its cheeks than Malkmus’s own recent solo effort.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is something unceasingly engaging about Trans Am. [Apr 2004, p.122]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At a time when Fatboy Slim has gone chill-out, Orbital have gone noodly, and Underworld, nd Prodigy seem to have just gone somewhere else, Basement Jaxx are, happily, on hand with another brilliantly messy blueprint for UK dance music - and dance music that you can actually dance to, at that.