Q Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 7,251 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Neon Bible
Lowest review score: 0 Gemstones
Score distribution:
7251 music reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bold, ambitious and revelling in the chaos of the age, 21st Century Breakdown is another perfect document of our times. [Jun 2009, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An IMAX band in an iPad age, it's there that they'll prosper. [Oct 2012, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A self-contained gem. [Jul 2005, p.112]
    • Q Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Panhandle Rambler sounds more inspired than anything the 68-year-old's produced in 20 years. [Dec 2015, p.106]
    • Q Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Humor Risk is another casually monumental achievement from one of the great singer-songwriters of the day. [Dec. 2011 p. 130]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This mixtape is broad in scope and delirious in flavour. [Jan 2009, p.1222]
    • Q Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Paul Kelly still captivates with the strength of his storytelling. [May 2013, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A record to get lost in. [Jun 2015, p.99]
    • Q Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As ever, the gravel-voiced Lightburn sounds as if singing for his life rather than his supper yet, without sacrificing that epic feel that always set this band apart, he's broadening his horizons. [Apr 2011, p.101]
    • Q Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A+E
    When he's on this sort of excitable form, no one, Albarn included can keep up. [May 2012, p.108]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a human message: No matter where you are, the party's what you make of it. [Jul 2010, p.124]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Brooklyn trio rein in the misery. [July 2011, p. 106]
    • Q Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rock heritage fetishism at its finest. [Jul 2014, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the albums of the year to date. [Oct 2014, p.118]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An irresistibly fun-packed career high. [Sep 2014, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An astonishing cohesive record. [Dec 2015, p.107]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are a couple of mildly sludgy moments.... But otherwise, it's a perfectly calibrated record. [Nov 2014, p.113]
    • Q Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This ends up as a thrilling victory of an album because at its heart it has the same great swirling mass of melancholic energy that drove their debut. [Nov 2012, p.88]
    • Q Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The next crossover metal band has arrived. [Nov 2013, p.101]
    • Q Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When Green is good here, he is very good, and the mis-steps are minor niggles.[Dec. 2011 p. 132]
    • Q Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rather than sounding like musical magpies, The Fratellis are always their own men. [July 2008, p.100]
    • Q Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Elson's theatrical but appealing voice adds genuine drama to the darkly brooding Stolen Roses, while the title track is a handsome murder ballad. [Jul 2010, p.133]
    • Q Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their prog-packaged second LP, split between six duo tracks and nine augmented by stellar sax, trumpet, harp, tabla and drums maestri, will indeed unite you with the cosmos but you can't help moving to the groove too. [Sep 2017, p.106]
    • Q Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thankfully... this reissue comes with a bonus instrumental disc, allowing the orchestral menace to speak for itself. [Oct 2003, p.127]
    • Q Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These records might not eclipse Channel Orange, but they have their own mercurial gleam, mapping the spaces between people, reaching for a hazy intimacy that almost feels real. [Nov 2016, p.112]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A set of songs so cockle-warmingly familiar that you're left scanning the credits to see who did them the first time. [Oct 2002, p.118]
    • Q Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The vocalist work fine but instrumentals like Tempest and Velcro demonstrate that Rustie's personality is plenty big enough on its own. [Oct 2014, p.118]
    • Q Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Two Vines is a leap forward for pop's most enchanting odd couple. [Dec 2016, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The real surprises come when they sound relaxed, even delicate. [Oct 2012, p.92]
    • Q Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Perfectamundo explodes into glorious Technicolor. [Dec 2015, p.107]
    • Q Magazine