Q Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 6,206 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 GRRR!
Lowest review score: 0 Gemstones
Score distribution:
6,206 music reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is one glaring drawback: so taboo-shredding are her lyrics, and so brutal her music, that she probably won't achieve the clout to which she obviously aspires. [Oct 2003, p.99]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's some indication of Feast of Wire's accomplished evocation of Arizona's old weirdness that it makes you want to go to Tucson. [Mar 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What on paper sounds like an awkward hotch-potch, actually makes for an hugely enticing, fluid record.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not only do Kannberg’s vocals sound more robust than previously, but the whole record has considerably more colour in its cheeks than Malkmus’s own recent solo effort.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is something unceasingly engaging about Trans Am. [Apr 2004, p.122]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At a time when Fatboy Slim has gone chill-out, Orbital have gone noodly, and Underworld, nd Prodigy seem to have just gone somewhere else, Basement Jaxx are, happily, on hand with another brilliantly messy blueprint for UK dance music - and dance music that you can actually dance to, at that.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A seedily romantic, kitchen-sink paean to London, We Love The City finds Hefner's previously wan guitar stylings given a coat of production lustre.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Heartbreaking, gorgeous and totally individual, these big-production numbers meld the different but complementary beauties of Nashville country and sweet soul while adding a dash of wine-dark weirdness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Most of Kish Kash sounds like the album they intended to make after Remedy. [Nov 2003, p.106]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A harrowing, clearly autobiographical dissection of a decaying relationship. [Sep 2001, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a band consolidating their talents rather than simply showcasing them. [Aug 2003, p.108]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From rock riffs to cheesy electronics, nothing is off limits here, the gurgling stream of playful beats and gorgeous melodies carried along on a tide of Can's dreamy krautrock, ambient instrumental bliss and infectious '70s rock grooves.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The poppier bits like Jupiter Rising don't always work, but the darkly gritty Time In Babylon, in particular, shows just how far Harris has pushed the traditional country sound. [Oct 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unabashed whimsy merges seamlessly with melodious garage rock. [Jul 2003, p.100]
    • Q Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It'd be easy to throw the "emo" tag at them, but Matt Pryor's approach has more in common with the disarming honesty of Weezer's Rivers Cuomo than mere whinging. [Nov 2002, p.100]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One Part Lullaby's chugging, folk/soul interface and tagged-on beats has a more natural flow than before ... He's still proffering those cryptic, jittery asides ("one part lullaby, two parts fear" in the title track), but at least Lou Barlow's music sounds relaxed these days.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As synth-rock rebirths go, it's highly convincing. [Jun 2003, p.95]
    • Q Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Napolitano's lyrics exemplify the "perfect turn of word" for which she praises Bryan Ferry in a tribute song called Roxy. [Jan 2002, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This time, there's a bankable chorus or barbed sentiment for every mirror-ball moment, not just on the singles. [Sep 2001, p.112]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mostly brilliant and, most surprising of all, never pretentious. [Oct 2003, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He's beginning to develop his own sound as well as his own voice. [Mar 2004, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their best yet. [Sep 2001, p.120]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sure, it sails close to novelty record territory but Folds demonstrates exceptional skill in marrying wryly observational lyrics to upbeat piano-driven craziness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's big and it's clever.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More tightly structured than their last outing TNT, this has enough dizzy polyrhythms and craziness for the free jazzers but is chock full of tunes, good humour and a certain grooviness
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the odd bump Sexsmith could be in business at last. [Dec 2002, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Proffers a newfound poignancy. [Nov 2003, p.110]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A record that occupies the exact mid-point between the ghetto sass of her Puff Daddy-produced debut and 1999's poised, soulful Mary. [Oct 2001, p.117]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Grandaddy sound like a lo-fi ELO and, in frontman Jason Lytle, possess an admirably unusual songwriter. Sophtware Slump is more coherent than their 1997 debut Under The Western Freeway, Lytle having settled on a theme: knackered electronics.... Cheap, cheerful and utterly charming.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Still a stunningly individual reinvention of hip hop and R&B, with great songs swimming in a murk of bizarre arrangements. [Apr 2002, p.119]
    • Q Magazine