Q Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 6,037 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Doolittle 25
Lowest review score: 0 Gemstones
Score distribution:
6,037 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In truth, there are unexpected delights at every turn here, not least in the realisation that Mercury Rev may only just be hitting their collective stride. [Sep 2001, p.115]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All 10 songs yield more delights with every hearing. [May 2003, p.112]
    • Q Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    5
    It retains all the allure of the most hypnotic electronica with none of the digital cliches. [Jan 2004, p.122]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Part Jewel-with-tunes, part Tori-Amos-without-kookiness, it noodles, but only rarely.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an album which manages the rare trick of being accessible and head-warpingly barmy both at the same time. [Nov 2002, p.96]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A meditation on modern urban life that lets the city shine with mystery, menace and grace. [Jan 2004, p.118]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An absolute masterclass in thoughtful, emotional songwriting. [Apr 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Exhausting, but borderline brilliant too. [May 2003, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The songs here are rougher, louder, and often more exciting than their "official" versions. [Nov 2000, p.123]
    • Q Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A fresh production eye might have rescued its weaker segments - Love Calling Earth or the dull By All Means Necessary - and its surprising lack of overall oomph.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Something rather lovely with a jittery edge that halts proceedings well before they arrive at saccharine-sweet. [Aug 2003, p.115]
    • Q Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stylistically, Lynne steps out in several directions and gives the impression that she could succeed in any of them: the warm caress of her voice and the cool, cutting edge of her songs suggest great things.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Admittedly Maas is hardly reinventing the wheel here, but there's a freshness and pace that's been missing too long. [Mar 2002, p.126]
    • Q Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This most recalls their masterful Through The Trees, only with pedal steel, banjo, bowed saw and some of their best harmony vocals yet. [Oct 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fortunately, Elliott and Timbaland's idea of old school is rather unorthodox. [Jan 2003, p.121]
    • Q Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [A] measured and thoughtful set of intelligent pop tunes. [Oct 2003, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An astonishing reassertion of relevance for Plant. [July 2002, p.118]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beautiful stuff: sunny with a sad undertow, like The Beach Boys, Beck and The Beatles put in a blender. [Nov 2003, p.110]
    • Q Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    OST
    Showcas[es] [Shields'] typically speaker-buckling white noise. [Nov 2003, p.126]
    • Q Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A superb piece of work. [Apr 2002, p.117]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At times, he thinks as laterally as Pavement's Stephen Malkmus. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fannypack might already be sick of the Beastie Boys comparisons, but it works on too may levels to be ignored. [Oct 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A rare treat, with Jones' stripped-back, largely acoustic band brilliantly framing that voice... [Nov. 2000, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If a brace of previous albums hinted at genre-defying transcendence, Obrigado Saudade attains it. [Mar 2004, p.107]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This genuinely feels like a fresh start rather than time-killing. [Mar 2003, p.100]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Almost classic Green. [Jan 2004, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Finisterre distills their Mellotrons, strummed guitars and electronic beats to a fine essence. [Oct 2002, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result glitters like diamond.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Finds his muse back in rudest health after the relative disappointment of Rock N Roll. [Feb 2004, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Coy, genail and funny... a potent antidote to the usual chill-out porridge. [#184, p.140]
    • Q Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Superior to both the last two Mode albums and [Martin] Gore's recent solo effort, Counterfeit 2. [Jul 2003, p.103]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Few bands epitomise so well the virtues of not fixing that which isn't broken.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Admittedly, her FM-friendly singalongs aren't rocket science, just fantastically effective. [May 2003, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is the quieter songs, like the beautiful Throwing Stones, that make this record the most charming Rubin has produced since Donovan's comeback. [May 2003, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Part 1's eight deluxe country rock essays all impress. [Feb 2004, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their debut album's secret arsenal comprises frontman Chris Martin's voice - prematurely aged for someone in their early twenties - and some supple, persuasive melodies. That and a great big side order of melancholy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is one glaring drawback: so taboo-shredding are her lyrics, and so brutal her music, that she probably won't achieve the clout to which she obviously aspires. [Oct 2003, p.99]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's some indication of Feast of Wire's accomplished evocation of Arizona's old weirdness that it makes you want to go to Tucson. [Mar 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What on paper sounds like an awkward hotch-potch, actually makes for an hugely enticing, fluid record.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not only do Kannberg’s vocals sound more robust than previously, but the whole record has considerably more colour in its cheeks than Malkmus’s own recent solo effort.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is something unceasingly engaging about Trans Am. [Apr 2004, p.122]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At a time when Fatboy Slim has gone chill-out, Orbital have gone noodly, and Underworld, nd Prodigy seem to have just gone somewhere else, Basement Jaxx are, happily, on hand with another brilliantly messy blueprint for UK dance music - and dance music that you can actually dance to, at that.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A seedily romantic, kitchen-sink paean to London, We Love The City finds Hefner's previously wan guitar stylings given a coat of production lustre.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Heartbreaking, gorgeous and totally individual, these big-production numbers meld the different but complementary beauties of Nashville country and sweet soul while adding a dash of wine-dark weirdness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Most of Kish Kash sounds like the album they intended to make after Remedy. [Nov 2003, p.106]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A harrowing, clearly autobiographical dissection of a decaying relationship. [Sep 2001, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a band consolidating their talents rather than simply showcasing them. [Aug 2003, p.108]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From rock riffs to cheesy electronics, nothing is off limits here, the gurgling stream of playful beats and gorgeous melodies carried along on a tide of Can's dreamy krautrock, ambient instrumental bliss and infectious '70s rock grooves.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The poppier bits like Jupiter Rising don't always work, but the darkly gritty Time In Babylon, in particular, shows just how far Harris has pushed the traditional country sound. [Oct 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unabashed whimsy merges seamlessly with melodious garage rock. [Jul 2003, p.100]
    • Q Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It'd be easy to throw the "emo" tag at them, but Matt Pryor's approach has more in common with the disarming honesty of Weezer's Rivers Cuomo than mere whinging. [Nov 2002, p.100]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One Part Lullaby's chugging, folk/soul interface and tagged-on beats has a more natural flow than before ... He's still proffering those cryptic, jittery asides ("one part lullaby, two parts fear" in the title track), but at least Lou Barlow's music sounds relaxed these days.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As synth-rock rebirths go, it's highly convincing. [Jun 2003, p.95]
    • Q Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Napolitano's lyrics exemplify the "perfect turn of word" for which she praises Bryan Ferry in a tribute song called Roxy. [Jan 2002, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This time, there's a bankable chorus or barbed sentiment for every mirror-ball moment, not just on the singles. [Sep 2001, p.112]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mostly brilliant and, most surprising of all, never pretentious. [Oct 2003, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He's beginning to develop his own sound as well as his own voice. [Mar 2004, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their best yet. [Sep 2001, p.120]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sure, it sails close to novelty record territory but Folds demonstrates exceptional skill in marrying wryly observational lyrics to upbeat piano-driven craziness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's big and it's clever.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More tightly structured than their last outing TNT, this has enough dizzy polyrhythms and craziness for the free jazzers but is chock full of tunes, good humour and a certain grooviness
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the odd bump Sexsmith could be in business at last. [Dec 2002, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Proffers a newfound poignancy. [Nov 2003, p.110]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A record that occupies the exact mid-point between the ghetto sass of her Puff Daddy-produced debut and 1999's poised, soulful Mary. [Oct 2001, p.117]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Grandaddy sound like a lo-fi ELO and, in frontman Jason Lytle, possess an admirably unusual songwriter. Sophtware Slump is more coherent than their 1997 debut Under The Western Freeway, Lytle having settled on a theme: knackered electronics.... Cheap, cheerful and utterly charming.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Still a stunningly individual reinvention of hip hop and R&B, with great songs swimming in a murk of bizarre arrangements. [Apr 2002, p.119]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Simultaneously lovely and repellent, there's echoes of the Pet Shop Boys, Pink Floyd and Momus. But, in truth, their combination of the sinister and the delicious is entirely original.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Trendy, sure, but occasionally terrific.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Verity Susman's wayward, fragile Nico-lite vocals will either delight you or drive you nuts. [Mar 2003, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a stride towards true excellence. Although likely to remain a cult item, The Beta Band are now easier to embrace than ever, less pastoral and more direc, courtesy of a clear, sharp, intensely rhythmic new sound... [#180, p.97]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album - musically more extravagant, lyrically just as searching - takes its place at the shoulder of 1994's Stones In The Road as her best yet.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As musically dazzling as Midnite Vultures often is, the one criticism that can be still levelled at Beck is that his songs remain strangely soulless, failing to ever really grip the emotions or stir the soul.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even at their most acerbic or delicately downplayed extremes, Incubus are compelling. [#184, p.137]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eerie, exotic and utterly enchanting. [Mar 2002, p.116]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Five years ago she collaborated with Brian Eno and U2 producer Daniel Lanois on the ambient Wrecking Ball. Now she returns with a less intense but no less powerful new record that continues that album's heavy/ethereal vibe, courtesy of producer (and Wrecking Ball engineer) Malcolm Burn, but with a more melodic touch.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you were charmed by early Gorky's Zygotic Mynci, or simply fancy a bonkers tune-fest, this inspired, lo-fi rock is for you. [Apr 2004, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His most poignant and accessible work to date. [Feb 2003, p.96]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Air thrive on existing at an otherworldly tangent and their cosmic bent is never far away here. [Feb 2004, p.99]
    • Q Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A boundlessly entertaining expose of what happens when you mix fine words with excellent melodies to make great songs.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unhinged but snow-cool. [Apr 2004, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's the laziest of comparisons, but their harmonies--and they do it expertly live, so fear not--do have the ring of The Beach Boys. [May 2003, p.99]
    • Q Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As before, it's a heady swirl of rock, soul and hippy lyrics. However, it feels fantastic and, unless the record company is snoring soundly, it's full of hits.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's all linked by a sense of dignity, wisely chosen collaborators and David Hidalgo's voice. [Aug 2004, p.115]
    • Q Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With its uncomfortable candour, Under Rug Swept is a serious business.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's difficult to hear what was wrong with most of the never-before heard material. [Nov 2000, p.101]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A happy mess of ideas, fun and riffing. [Jul 2004, p.122]
    • Q Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like the '70s, then, but much more fun. [Nov 2002, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An effortless melding of Stones and Family Stone, Curtis Mayfield and computers, all topped off with Tim Burgess's fetching new falsetto.... With every track a winner, Wonderland is a truly thing of wonder.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An essay in coolly assured, sophisticated leftfield rock, occasionally laden with trademark discordance yet also full of scintillating tunes. [June 2002, p.123]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Reserve space and time for it. [Feb 2005, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sharp, seductive music from a band at their peak. [Oct 2001, p.119]
    • Q Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her jazz-tinged voice soars; the music manages to be both wonderfully austere and subtly strange. [Jun 2004, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Kozelek's compelling ache of a voice to the fore, his star deserves to wax anew. [Mar 2004, p.113]
    • Q Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Treat Yourself With Kindness... calls to mind what Morrissey and Marr might have come up with if requested to soundtrack the closing credits of It's A Wonderful Life. [Mar 2003, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [There's] a raw, anxious quality reminiscent of '80s US cult favourites Violent Femmes. [May 2004, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They've made a fine pop record without compromising their trademark quirkiness.... The band's best work to date. [Aug 2003, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Melodically, this matches The Lemonheads at their best. [Aug 2002, p.126]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Poignant beyond words... but never mawkish. [Dec 2003, p.140]
    • Q Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Spikily brilliant. [Apr 2003, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While this falls short of the momentous A Few Small Repairs, it's still something to treasure.