RogerEbert.com's Scores

  • Movies
For 785 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Crash Reel
Lowest review score: 0 Kick-Ass 2
Score distribution:
785 movie reviews
  1. The best part of Lars von Trier's fascinating, engaging and often didactic Nymphomaniac is that, despite the sometimes-grim tone and bleak color palate, it's an extremely funny film, playful, even.
  2. What elevates Hide Your Smiling Faces is Carbone's gentle, lyrical touch where other filmmakers would have turned the same thematic concerns into melodrama.
  3. The rare film in this genre that serves as both entry point and continuation. For a change, you can walk in cold and you won't be too lost.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Amounts to a valuable if tremendously damning commentary on our current political culture.
  4. The bloody fingerprints of Quentin Tarantino and the Coen brothers — among other violence-prone auteurs — are smeared all over his tidy and tautly-told Blue Ruin.
  5. In the end, Locke is a cinematic stunt that engrosses as it unspools, and pays dividends after it’s been accomplished.
  6. The sheer filmmaking craft on display here shames almost any comparably budgeted superhero picture you can name.
  7. Night Moves eschews traditional tension-building through plot twists and betrayals to focus on its characters, as Reichardt uses her increasingly impressive sense of composition and intuitive pacing to slow burn the audience into a state of anxiety instead of manipulatively pushing them there.
  8. The movie has an organic intelligence and a sense that it, too, exists outside of linear time. It seems to be creating itself as you watch it.
  9. Unlike in Judd Apatow's "Knocked Up," with a similar circumstance and where abortion is not even mentioned by name (except for the cowardly "schma-shmortion"), Obvious Child is honest.
  10. While the cast may not include any names that are familiar in these parts, they are all effortlessly charming and engaging throughout.
  11. The Case Against 8 beautifully reminds us of the human beings who opened up their lives to the world and became representatives for one of the most important movements for equal rights this country has ever seen.
  12. If anyone is concerned about the way women are presented on the big screen these days, just look at how an evolved male like Hiccup respectfully treats his girlfriend Astrid (America Ferrera) and the portrayal of Blanchett’s Valka.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Easily the most daring and politically provocative film yet to emerge from Iran.
  13. What is truly delightful about the film is its loopy, gently slapstick sense of humor, its use of continuous running gags that pay off cumulatively (no small feat), and the dreamy sense that Schilling's somnambulism is pierced through only by the insane incomprehensible behavior of others.
  14. Looking at the picture’s mostly sun-drenched and drolly cheerful surface layer, one marvels at Rohmer’s unerring sense of what drama kings and queens young people can be.
  15. A remarkably full-bodied and frank character study that illuminates the old saw about the political being personal in a genuinely unusual way.
  16. If the name "Gilliam" set off a little tremor of excitement when you heard it that is no accident because, with its combination of startling visuals, a head-spinning storyline and oddball characters that don't always conform to their presumed parameters, Snowpiercer is a film definitely in the vein of the works of the great Terry Gilliam, especially his 1985 landmark "Brazil."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The real question of culpability that provides an element of suspense here, ironically, concerns not the obvious baddies but the ostensible good guys.
  17. Life itself, that loaded two-word phrase, is what Roger really wrote about when he wrote about movies.
  18. Loud, smart and ferociously committed to its premise, and it leaves an intriguingly bitter aftertaste.
  19. In movies, there’s “character driven,” and then there’s “CHARACTER driven.” Earl Lynn Nelson, who plays one of the two lead roles in Land Ho! a truly disarming and beguiling movie, seems from all indications to be an all-caps character.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Though this is a story of enormous cultural importance and dramatic power, it’s virtually impossible to imagine today’s Hollywood making a movie about it.
  20. This is the kind of movie that galvanizes and discomfits while it’s on screen, and is terrific fodder for conversation long after its credits roll. Even if you are neither Catholic nor Irish, this Calvary will in no way be a useless sacrifice of your moviegoing time.
  21. If you go in for allusive British humor that builds slowly from dry to uproarious, as executed by two absolute masters of the form, The Trip To Italy will work for you, I believe. I also think the film, directed, like the prior one, by the astute Michael Winterbottom, is a somewhat smoother trip than the first.
  22. If you can hook into it, Level Five is not just witty, insinuating, and penetrating; it’s also unexpectedly moving and, as deliberately threadbare as it often looks, cinematically rich.
  23. Starred Up is HEAVY with slang and accents. You won’t understand a third of it. But there’s so much going on in between the lines of dialogue that you won’t care.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The Congress, playing fast and loose with a source novel by Stanislaw Lem, splits from its version of reality at the 45-minute mark, and at that point becomes a decadent post-modern classic.
  24. The Trials of Muhammad Ali a unique and inspiring viewing experience.
  25. Intelligently conceived, beautifully executed and filled with surprisingly convincing performances all around... We Are What We Are is that rare horror film that could play at both arthouse and grindhouse theaters without seemingly out of place at either one.

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