RogerEbert.com's Scores

  • Movies
For 739 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Gloria
Lowest review score: 0 But Always
Score distribution:
739 movie reviews
  1. I love how Boyhood admits that, in certain ways, growing up stinks. Every character has a least one moment in which they have to heed the advice of Corinthians and put away childish things. None of them like it.
  2. A somber, meditative, almost poetic film that delivers the horrors of bondage stripped down and head-on.
  3. For all its stunning exteriors, it's really concerned with emotional interiors, and it goes about exploring them with simplicity and directness.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Before Midnight is moving because it acknowledges that even love stories that began as beautifully as Jesse and Celine's must still endure the wear and tear of real life.
  4. The most satisfyingly diabolical cinematic structure that the Coens have ever contrived, and that's just one reason that I suspect it may be their best movie yet.
  5. Looking at the picture’s mostly sun-drenched and drolly cheerful surface layer, one marvels at Rohmer’s unerring sense of what drama kings and queens young people can be.
  6. A powerful and thoughtful film, it is also not what it at first seems, which is part of the point Polley appears to be interested in making. Can the truth ever actually be known about anything?
  7. Her
    Her remains one of the most engaging and genuinely provocative movies you're likely to see this year, and definitely a challenging but not inapt date movie.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    While The Overnighters has the feel of an epic, given what an expansive slice of America’s current economic experience it ponders, it’s also a very intimate one.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's those bigger questions about our nature and our capacity to think beyond self interest that will stick with you.
  8. David O. Russell out-Scorseses Martin Scorsese with American Hustle, a '70s crime romp that's ridiculously entertaining in all the best ways.
  9. This masterpiece about propaganda, cinema and vanity as instruments of power and terror ends on an excruciatingly sustained, righteous money shot: a monster who could have been a good man suffocates on the truth.
  10. The Tale of Princess Kaguya is both very simple and head-spinningly confounding, a thing of endless visual beauty that seems to partake in a kind of pictorial minimalism but finds staggering possibilities for beautiful variation within its ineluctable modality. It’s a true work of art.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Though superlatives can mischaracterize any movie’s qualities, it is not an overstatement, I think, to call Citizenfour, Laura Poitras’ film about Edward Snowden, the movie of the century (to date).
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Ida
    Riveting, original and breathtakingly accomplished on every level, Ida would be a masterpiece in any era, in any country.
  11. Birdman is a complete blast from start to finish.
  12. While there have been plenty of movie romances not unlike this, there's never been one told in such an ambitiously immersive way.
  13. Anderson the illusion-maker is more than graceful, he's dazzling, and with this movie he's created an art-refuge that consoles and commiserates. It's an illusion, but it's not a lie.
  14. Whiplash is cinematic adrenalin. In an era when so many films feel more refined by focus groups or marketing managers, it is a deeply personal and vibrantly alive drama.
  15. As an examination of memory and experience and how they shape us, The Missing Picture is meaningful beyond its specific subject matter.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Riveting, wrenching and extraordinarily important.
  16. If you can hook into it, Level Five is not just witty, insinuating, and penetrating; it’s also unexpectedly moving and, as deliberately threadbare as it often looks, cinematically rich.
  17. Life itself, that loaded two-word phrase, is what Roger really wrote about when he wrote about movies.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Here is a formidable opus whose real spiritual relative is Tennyson's "Ulysses". Yes. All is Lost is that good.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The film’s winsome, self-satisfied comedy will no doubt appeal more to viewers who prize juvenile hi-jinks over the cultural moment it depicts.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Easily the most daring and politically provocative film yet to emerge from Iran.
  18. Nebraska is full of complicated people marked by flaws and failures, mistakes and regrets; they can be selfish bastards, too. It often feels as though Payne is trying to strip away the cliché that the region is populated exclusively by hardworking, decent hearted types.
  19. Like its hero, Stand Clear of the Closing Doors goes with the flow and has a chaotic and thrilling time but doesn't know where to go or what to do with itself.
  20. This 43-year-old filmmaker is a major talent. Though he may not be the second coming of Fellini, his films all have a funny, refreshingly complex perspective, and his latest work is a perfect example of why he is the next big Italian thing.
  21. The film's flintiness and initially subdued nastiness set it apart from most other action films about the thin line separating cops from crooks.

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