Rolling Stone's Scores

For 4,124 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 Scream
Score distribution:
4,124 music reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Reveal[s] an unexpectedly lilting and rootsy side to its sound and a growing facility for evocative storytelling lyrics.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Delightfully downtrodden. [24 Aug 2006, p.90]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Imagine music inspired by the Beatles' "Mother Nature's Son" and the Grateful Dead's "Mountains of the Moon" made with harps, hand drums and murmured vocals. [4 May 2006, p.57]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's the master's steady, rollicking piano that elevates the music -- and keeps the ever-elusive Costello honest.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On News and Tributes, the Futureheads make punk that's packed with ideas and downright radiant.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Less miserable than Fiona Apple, less wacky than Nellie McKay and less hippieish than Tori Amos, Spektor shows off her gorgeous, fluttery voice, her burgeoning writer chops and her God-given quirks on [Begin to Hope].
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dusk and Summer can be as ponderous and precious as a Hallmark card, but it succeeds because Carrabba has found music as intense and bittersweet as his deep, deep feelings. [29 Jun 2006, p.68]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you manage to suspend your disbelief a little, Black Holes and Revelations will push your pleasure buttons.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Pipettes have none of Winehouse’s soul aspirations--just better songs and more sex.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album runs out of gas a bit toward the end, with a few too many songs in a row stuck in a midtempo Neil Young-ish lope. But for most of the ride, Highway Companion is worth the trip.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Mastermind John Roderick packs an endearing, nuanced indie-boy voice and a bucketload of bittersweet pop-rock melodies. [13 Jul 2006, p.105]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Features some of his most beautiful, introverted and delicate tunes yet. [24 Aug 2006, p.94]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    She never sounds like she's trying too hard.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [Kasher] stretches his tormented yowl and harsh guitars, with his band bashing even louder than on its 2004 breakthrough, The Ugly Organ. [7 Sep 2006, p.105]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's on the second half where the Mars Volta catch fire. [21 Sep 2006, p.88]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's sometimes too somber, but Darnielle's persona--tender and slightly nasal, colloquial and commanding--keeps you listening. [7 Sep 2006, p.105]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It all sounds familiar but strange, and beautiful enough to suck you in. [24 Aug 2006, p.94]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Unlike her work with Stars, Millan's album plays less like a score for a broken heart and more like a boozy cowgirl hymnal. [21 Sep 2006, p.84]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [A] dark, magnetic opus. [24 Aug 2006, p.90]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For every head-nodding beat, Game Theory has a head-turning treat. [7 Sep 2006, p.100]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although his best new tracks are thrilling... some of the up-tempo stuff flirts with mechanical muscle-flexing. [21 Sep 2006, p.86]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As a full-length Shadow album, The Outsider buckles from its forced diversity. [24 Aug 2006, p.94]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The sound may be retro, but pure blues rock of this caliber is really timeless. [21 Sep 2006, p.84]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fist-pumpable rock with brains, heart and words worth coming back to. [5 Oct 2006, p.69]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's a kick in the way song after song masks his darkish vision in elegantly hooky arrangements whose sonic signature owes more to folk rock than to prog or musical theater. [5 Oct 2006, p.68]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The strength of the album... involves how, with tons of melody and tone and a little cheese, Seger fearlessly remains Seger. [21 Sep 2006, p.84]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A shameless solo debut full of Eighties-style electro bangers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The best songs on The Open Door are the creepiest.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Staples like the roadhouse boogie “Dancefloors" take on new exuberance now that their tunes are not drowning in murk, and cuts such as “One Big Holiday" just sound like prime Crazy Horse.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite some uneven striving-for-maturity moments... Sov's at her best when she doesn't take herself too seriously.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With its skewed pop melodies, home-brewed sonic trickery and blazing fingerpicking, Under the Skin is a mesmerizing return to the side of Buckingham that birthed the proto-indie-pop strangeness of 1979's Tusk.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Another lovely little package.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The weathered enchantment of Jansch's voice and the feathery exactness of his playing are what lift The Black Swan close to the classic status of 1969's Birthday Blues and 1973's Moonshine. [2 Nov 2006, p.72]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [A] bigger, better follow-up.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Several of these [tracks] match Oberst's best work.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The songwriting never quite comes together, but this is a metal record that gets by as much on sonic tricks as monster riffs.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Who knew that your grandparents' record collection could produce something so sassy?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hammond doesn't out-write his band -- several songs here get vague -- but Yours to Keep is more expansive than the Strokes, and sweeter.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Luminaries such as Emmylou Harris, Gillian Welch and Dolly Parton also make appearances -- but it's always clear who's sitting on the throne.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Brass-flecked tracks like "Shine" and "Faster Car" show he's best when he skips the singalong arena choruses; leaner productions like "Stupid Boy" show he's accomplished in ballads, unafraid to scuff up his smoothness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On Kingdom Come, the highs are really high, and the lows are really low.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The loveliness comes at a predictable cost in breakaway energy. [30 Nov 2006, p.112]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This lacks Fishscale's intensity and focus.... Of fifteen tracks, however, only the crassly sexist "Greedy Bitches" is devoid of charm.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If there's one problem, it's the lack of surprises.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Wincing the Night Away feels labored. Gracefully realized though it is, you can hear the three-plus years Mercer spent pondering how to satisfy the expectations his surprise classic had created -- and also how to remain fresh and true to himself.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like almost everything on Neon Bible... "No Cars Go" is excess with a point: We are drowning in the unspeakable and running out of air and fight. If only everything else on Neon Bible made that point with the same dynamic overkill.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Freedom's Road finds Mellencamp sounding more at ease than he has in years. [22 Feb 2007, p.74]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On Infinity on High, they expose the secret life of boys, in hilariously bloodcurdling detail.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Her long-underrated talent for simple, direct melodies makes it easy for these disciples to rescore Ono's songwriting in their own lingo. [22 Feb 2007, p.74]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Writer's Block is one of those albums where the songs seem familiar in a good way.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like everything the band has released since signing with Epic in the teeth of a millennial panic, it's louder and somewhat less twisty than the group's indie output.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You know how reunion albums work: You listen for the playing, not for the songs, which are mediocre at best.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Seemingly simple elements -- plucked violin, shuffling snare drums, chiming guitars, plinky piano, his spooky croon and magisterial whistle -- build into one heady, slippery whole.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dylanesque dresses up Dylan classics for a night on the town with Avalon-style atmosphere.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A marvelous, hazy trip full of Beach Boys-inspired psychedelia.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Most tracks stick to a downbeat, acoustic-folk template, although "May Day!" sounds like a lost Neutral Milk Hotel hoedown.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Wolf's joy is contagious, and there's nothing remotely not awesome about him. [22 Mar 2007, p.80]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Most of Costello is like a madcap Glasgow pub crawl: It makes you elated in the moment and sorry when it's over.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Very likable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's somewhat hit-or-miss. But when Smith hits, it isn't just a bull's-eye -- the arrow splits the apple and then brings down the bad guy hiding behind the tree.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A bit heavier and not as immediate, Favourite Worst Nightmare is a slightly lesser record, though by no means a Difficult Second Album.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is big-time party music, plain and simple.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [Ali] commands thick details and righteous anger. [19 Apr 2007, p.63]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The U.K. indie band’s second album has beefed-up sound and increasingly brilliant, not-at-all-pretentious gems like "Girls Who Play Guitars," "Russian Literature" and "Karaoke Plays."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Buck spits grimy, chest-thumping boasts with ear-grabbing command.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Volta is arguably Bjork's loosest and most ruminative record, and though it touches on everything she's ever done, it's not as gripping or coherent as her best stuff.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Morello's baritone voice is surprisingly expressive.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Give Mirrored a handful of listens and you might just enjoy having your brains splattered against your speakers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The only surprising thing about It Won't Be Soon Before Long is its complete avoidance of sophomore slump.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like his sometime heroes Led Zeppelin, Jack White builds monuments. They're suitable for awestruck visits. But they're no place to settle down.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When their free-flowing, melodic patter is matched with the right groove, that Cleveland magic returns.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Maths and English is long on dark, dense electro beats and frazzled techno, plus frantic-but-ballsy rhymes that even Brits might have trouble parsing.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a strangely atypical Adams record, just because it's his first typical one.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The I-need-love pop tunes are not getting any better, even with Timbaland and Justin Timberlake in the stripper ditty 'AYO Technology.' 'Follow My Lead” is an inexplicable Robin Thicke duet and 'Amusement Park' is even sillier. Much better is 'All of Me,' with Mary J. Blige. Wailing, "I got a feeling like I'm fiending on crack," Blige steals the show without even trying.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It all adds up to something lovably unpretentious – and pretty unique.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Not all of Spells is as memorable as you'd hope. [19 Apr 2007, p.63]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [Lowe] keeps it terrifically mellow without getting mushy in the head.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There is plenty of thrill in the fuzz-lined hard-rubber bends of Slash's guitar breaks and the way bassist Duff McKagan keeps time, like a cop swinging a billy club. There is honest depth here too.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On Last 2 Walk, every track is compelling, with synthesized strings and the usual depth-sounder bass lines inflated with reverb into miniature symphonies.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With loads of melodrama and not a moment of subtlety, Justice define the new-jacques swing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Planet Earth is one of those albums he makes when he's trying a little harder than usual, if not hard enough to alienate his core audience, which loves him for indulging himself.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His ear-grabbing command stands up to almost any MC out there.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Their keyboard-heavy, New Wave-ish music is also uncommonly catchy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Catchy they remain on their belated fourth album--also bright, dynamic, tender, brainy, unpretentious and civilly pansexual.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Their latest work is a twist--guest MCs on charging rhythms that are not quite tunes. Results vary.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's not that less is more--only that, in that moment, less is perfect.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Eventually La Radiolina's more guitar-based sonics will feel inevitable too, especially once you follow the same dynamic riff through three consecutive songs up front.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's the rare band that can switch from sampled music to live with no loss in riffage as they do here, and the almost-famous names who hitch themselves to Ninja's vocals do themselves a solid.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On Bluefinger, it sounds like the Pixies' fantastic reunion shows have allowed Black to finally shed his ambivalence about rocking out. So he does.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's high-gloss folk pop, confessional in form if not in content, crafted with intelligent attention to every detail.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Siouxsie concentrates all her eccentric music powers on her first solo album ever, one where you don’t have to keep telling yourself "but it’s Siouxsie" to pay attention.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    "The Ultimate Victory"--on which Cham expresses sympathy for media-dogged celebs like Eminem and Britney and admits, "I'm still filled with doubt"-- might be the most personally reflective hip-hop track since Slim Shady himself stepped to the mike.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    They're also songwriters--and good ones, too, preserving their party-boy reputation while turning out giant, soulful choruses on songs both manicured and memorable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is an anthology of strong new songs by a great bunch of bands, all calling themselves Foo Fighters.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There is high-speed dirt ('Wonderful Witches') and driving psychedelia (the title instrumental), but the most avant-garde quality of this record is its gentle assertion of detail.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Vedder, free from the noise (and outrage) of his day job, disappears into the sublime beauty of the simple, banjo-plucked 'No Ceiling.'
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beam finally brings the blood, instrumental colors and quirky but fluid arrangements that make explicit the worry and wounds running red in his Southern-gothic stories and dead-love letters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's nothing minimal about the music, which is cleanly produced, smartly textured hippie shamble.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Songs About Girls isn't a hip-hop record, but a pop&B album of mellow head-nodders that veer between chilled-out soul and lite-electro funk.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is an album that captures the range of her styles, from the rhythmically charged pop of her Eurythmics days to the haunted, longing ballads of her solo career. If the two approaches don't always cohere, each is satisfying in its own right.