Rolling Stone's Scores

For 4,074 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 What's Going On [40th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 Know Your Enemy
Score distribution:
4,074 music reviews
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The four songs on his latest EP, Mission Accomplished, continue to wander down that same fascinating but frustrating road to nowhere.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is unabashedly slick adult contemporary fare -- file between Eric Clapton's work with Babyface and the last Tina Turner album -- but Richie can still write and sing the hell out of a get-you-right-there-where-it-hurts ballad...
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Intimate strings, minimal drums and soft sighs caress meandering tunes that avoid hooks or obvious statements. But Sheik's delivery lacks the emotional depth of his U.K. models: Nick Drake, David Sylvian and the Blue Nile couldn't conceal their pain behind lush arrangements.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The band doesn't exactly have a lot of new ideas about what a rock song should sound like.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The production rarely approaches the wit or inventiveness that Elliott and Timbaland have established as their trademarks.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sadly, the cuts that reveal Nas' depth and drive get lost in a jumble of sloppy filler.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Songs From an American Movie sounds orchestral and homespun at once: Lustrous, fancy strings on one song give way to a slap-happy ukulele on the next. Yet it's too much of both and not enough of either.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    These are not radical deconstructions a la Cat Power -- just Jones lending her slurred, cozy drawl to material ranging from Traffic's "Low Spark of High Heeled Boys," delivered as a jazzy torch song, to a stripped-down take on Charlie Chaplin's "Smile."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Often beautifully sung, always pretty, the album still seems troubled beyond heartbreak.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's a messy album, one that's instrumentally inventive, melodically underdeveloped, vocally overcooked and lyrically just plain lazy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Imbruglia's delicate, sweet and well-behaved singing isn't the ideal vehicle for expressing angst, even if most of these minor-chord, gray-skies anthems seem to be yearning to do just that.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Thirty-eight minutes of co-writes and covers feels slight for seven years' work.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's nice that 10,000 Hz. Legend sounds very little like Air's masterworks Premier Symptomes and Moon Safari. Unfortunately, it also sounds like Air trying very hard not to be Air.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The coolest thing about Incubus is the way they come front-and-center with their inner little girl.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This collection of mostly originals, her first since 1985's The Ballad of Sally Rose, is swamped in beauty: swooning vocal harmonies; delicate poetics; lilting Celticisms.... But Red Dirt Girl is stiflingly exquisite.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    He's gotten the Chicago basement vibe down exactly right... What's missing are songs -- instead, we get sketches, riffs and doodles.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Guest is merely OK, a power-pop record whose songs seem catchy while they're playing but don't make a lasting impression.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Odds 'n' sods collections rarely have a favorable ratio of unearthed revelations to throwaway tunes -- even for critically acclaimed, British, neotraditionalist, jammy rock bands with gloriously raspy singers.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    These collaborations reveal one fatal flaw in the album's formula: All the imported noise makes the X-Men's delicate routines of cutting and juggling seem hopelessly obscure.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The album's baffling mono feel weakens the French Kicks' already anemic sound.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's been almost five years since England's Spice Girls had people smiling or sneering. Their third album, Forever, will probably provoke a reaction somewhere in the middle -- with one exception, it's just OK.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    [He brings] a real, radio-friendly pop element to electronic-based tunes he hopes will cross over.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    DMX is stuck at the crossroads that confronts every rapper trying to keep it real when reality no longer plays like an action movie.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Memorable tunes seldom emerge from the murk.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Smith is incapable of writing five bad songs in a row; even hopeless records (1992's Wish) sport some saving grace ("Friday I'm in Love"). But he can write four bad songs in a row, and Cure albums tend to leak filler like an attic spilling insulation. The latest, Bloodflowers, is half dismissible droning, an unforgivable ratio considering it's only nine tracks long.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The snags occur with the group's efforts at grit and substance.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Kittie sound like they want to pursue harder extremes but can't decide whether to snicker or snarl, to play doomsayer or dominatrix.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a document, it's hard to refute; a track like "Pearl's Girl" keeps unfolding into different layers of aural spotlessness, finally tapering into silence.... But when the crowd does explode, divining the flow, the home listener feels left out of the party.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Every song on Mad Season is a production mini-epic.... Under the haywire production are crafty songs.... But when the crescendos surge and the keyboards chime, he starts to sound as unctuous as 1970s cheeseballs from Lobo to Jim Croce to the Guess Who's Burton Cummings. Songs that probably seemed vulnerable as demos have turned greedily narcissistic.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Black Market Music loses its sparkle and its melodic sense whenever it grows a conscience.