Rolling Stone's Scores

For 2,738 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Calle 54
Lowest review score: 0 Basic Instinct 2
Score distribution:
2738 movie reviews
  1. This hilarious and humane film nails its subject -- not just the unshaved armpits and the lack of underwear -- and marks Moodysson as a talent to watch.
  2. Unique and unforgettable.
  3. Detractors will see the usual parade of repressed feelings in a Masterpiece Theatre setting. Those who look closer will find one of the best films of the year.
  4. Waggish fun like this is too good to miss.
    • Rolling Stone
  5. Lane is a force of nature. Her slow-burning, fiercely erotic performance charges the movie.
  6. Setting it against the backdrop of a wanton city under siege, Schroeder crafts a film of whiplash urgency.
  7. It's a haunting, hypnotic film that exerts an escalating grip on the heart and the conscience.
    • Rolling Stone
  8. An uneven movie that nonetheless bristles with stinging wit and exerts a perverse fascination.
    • Rolling Stone
  9. Mitchell gives this post-punk, neo-glam rock extravaganza everything in his loaded arsenal of talents. He gets the sound right, the look right, the fun right and - this is crucial - the pain right.
  10. Let the unsettling secrets of this outrageously funny and steadily engrossing meditation on the life of two high school misfits after graduation catch you by surprise. It's that good.
  11. It's unmissable, flaws and all, because riveting suspense spiced with diabolical laughs and garnished with a sprig of kinky romance add up to the tastiest dish around.
  12. Begins like an episode of "I Love Lucy" and ends with the impact of "Easy Rider."
  13. Before this trippy, mesmerizing movie swerves out of control, it delivers an exhilarating and challenging ride.
  14. Get your titles straight -- this is the good one, and a roaring good time.
    • Rolling Stone
  15. Unforgiven is the most provocative western of Eastwood's career, and with Gene Hackman, Morgan Freeman and Richard Harris along for the ride, it's also the most potently acted.
  16. Irresistibly deranged.
    • Rolling Stone
  17. A uniquely hypnotic and haunting love story sparked by Nicolas Cage and Elisabeth Shue at their career best.
    • Rolling Stone
  18. The crazy-ass imagination at work in Being John Malkovich hits you like a blast of pure oxygen...this movie of constant astonishments will make you laugh hard and long.
    • Rolling Stone
  19. A maliciously funny and keenly observant movie -- director-writer Patrick Stettner makes a potent feature debut -- that serves its humor dark and without artificial sweeteners.
  20. Instead of the easy attitudinizing that is the default position for teen comedies, Gimme the Loot fills each frame with raw talent and exuberance.
  21. Nightcrawler curves and hisses its way into your head with demonic skill. When the laughs come, they stick in your throat. This is a deliciously twisted piece of work. And Gyllenhaal, coiled and ready to spring, is scarily brilliant. He truly is a monster for our time.
  22. The film belongs to Jolie. She won an Oscar for 1999's "Girl, Interrupted," but this is by far her best performance.
  23. It's the work of a major talent. Apatow scores by crafting the film equivalent of a stand-up routine that encompasses the joy, pain, anger, loneliness and aching doubt that go into making an audience laugh.
  24. It's the classic American tale of the family man triumphant, and Howard makes sure that it hits you right in the heart.
  25. It's warped and wonderfully effervescent. Ditto the songs by Danny Elfman, who sings the role of Bonejangles, the frontman for a skeleton jazz band at a swinging underworld club. Best of all is the love story.
  26. The fierce and funny film version has been directed by Texan Richard Linklater (Slacker, Dazed and Confused, Before Sunrise) with rare grace and compassion.
  27. Just for starters, no movie about the Dutch Resistance during World War II has any right to be this wildly entertaining, not to mention this provocative and potently erotic.
  28. Jones is a marvel. Sundance couldn't get enough of her. You won't, either. Her performance grabs hold and won't let go.
  29. Ray
    Jamie Foxx gets so far inside the man and his music that he and Ray Charles seem to breathe as one.
  30. For those who don't believe that truth trumps fiction for whacked-out depravity, mark this shockingly fierce and funny spellbinder as Exhibit A.
  31. Shrek 2 may be computer-generated, but its innate heart and glorious sense of mischief make it one of the best and most humane movies of the summer.
  32. This seriously funny movie, artfully photographed by the great Roger Deakins, is spiritual in nature, barbed in tone, and, oh, yeah, it stings like hell.
  33. It's a feast of smart, sexy, glorious talk. The Oscar for best foreign film belongs right here.
  34. Brimming with humor and heartbreak, Slumdog Millionaire meets at the border of art and commerce and lets one flow into the other as if that were the natural order of things.
  35. Powered by a transfixing Portman, Larrain's film – one of the year's best – is appropriately hard to pin down and impossible to forget.
  36. Immensely entertaining and provocative.
  37. You may have doubts about which side to choose, but there's no doubt about this mind-bender. It'll pin you to your seat.
  38. Tone-deaf but thunderously exciting.
  39. Kudrow's Michele is a deadpan delight as she joins fellow misfit Romy (a deliciously funny Mira Sorvino).
  40. McNaughton has made a film of clutching terror that's meant to heighten our awareness instead of dulling it. At the end, Henry is still out there among us. And he's no B-movie monster in a hockey mask. He could be the guy next door. This film gives off a dark chill that follows you all the way home.
  41. Here’s a powerhouse of a documentary that makes you feel mad as hell and unwilling to take it anymore.
  42. Don't miss it. Though Life Itself is a warts-and-all portrait Ebert didn't live to review, my guess is his thumbs would be shooting upward. Mine sure are.
  43. A dynamite film that ranks with the year's best.
  44. Appaloosa is gripping entertainment that keeps springing surprises.
  45. Cyrus, the summer's best, most original and crazily inventive comedy, is potently funny and painfully real.
  46. For some, the silver linings in Russell’s movies represent a failure to embrace darkness. I see them as a humanist’s act of resistance. That’s why American Hustle ranks with the year’s best movies. It gets under your skin.
  47. A joy to behold.
  48. This unnervingly funny and quietly devastating film -- director Todd Field's first since his smash 2001 debut with "In the Bedroom" -- pulls you in like a magnetic-force field.
  49. Down in the Valley is a wild thing that sticks with you long after it's over. You know, a real movie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Parenthood, heartfelt and howlingly comic, also comes spiced with risk and mischief. Just when you fear the movie might be swept away on a tidal wave of wholesomeness, a line, a scene or a performance poke through to restore messy, perverse reality.
  50. Glorious entertainment.
  51. Director Fernando Meirelles and screenwriter Jeffrey Caine put a human face on John le Carre's novel of sex, lies and dirty politics in modern Africa. Prepare for a thrilling ride.
  52. It will hook you good and keep you riveted.
  53. Blue Is the Warmest Color sweeps you up on waves of humor, heartbreak and ravishing romance.
  54. The Hangover ain't art, but Phillips has shaped the hardcore hilarity into the summer party movie of all our twisted dreams.
  55. It's a modern horror story that gets you where you live.
  56. It's a wow of a thriller with a soul that isn't computer generated. Poitras may be guilty of taking Snowden at face value, but she succeeds brilliantly in evoking a shadow villain intent on world domination. Big Brother is back, baby, and he's gone digital.
  57. You watch The Wrestler (with a superb title song from Bruce Springsteen) in a state of pure exhilaration. A great actor in a great movie will do that to you.
  58. Blue Caprice is a cinematic punch to the gut, a mind-bending meditation on how to mold a killer, and one of the most potent and provocative true-crime movies ever made.
  59. Artfully exciting and compulsively watchable even at a butt-numbing 152 minutes, the film makes good on the promise New Zealand writer-director Andrew Dominik showed with "Chopper" in 2000.
  60. Lasseter is back behind the wheel, and you can feel his love for all things automotive in every frame. No humans blot this anthropomorphic romp. Cars do all the talking.
  61. Zemeckis springs so many pow 3-D surprises you'll think Beowulf is your own private fun house.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Ronin represents an exhilarating return to form for Frankenheimer.
  62. Down in the mud with the guys, Moore finds the heart of her character and a career beyond vanity and hype. She's never looked better.
  63. The ending -- a more devastating surprise than "The Village" could manage -- caps eighty sweat-job minutes of imaginative, jolting suspense.
  64. Amateur is Hartley heaven, a sharp-witted thriller that takes off into dark and uncharted territory.
  65. Miyazaki works marvels. Sit back and behold.
  66. A slambam sci-fi thriller with a brain, a heart and an artful sense of purpose. You're in for a wild whoosh of a ride.
  67. Von Donnersmarck has crafted the best kind of movie: one you can't get out of your head.
  68. A movie handled with this kind of care is a rare gift. Refusing to hide from pain or bow to it, 50/50 makes its own rules. It'll get to you.
  69. In this steadily gripping hothouse of a thriller, it's Cooper -- funny, fierce and bug-wild -- who gives us a look into the abyss.
  70. Lukas Moodysson, a young Swedish director, crafts a stunner of a film out of familiar turf.
  71. McConaughey makes sure we feel his tenacity and triumphs in the treatment of AIDS. His explosive, unerring portrayal defines what makes an actor great, blazing commitment to a character and the range to make every nuance felt.
  72. What's fresh about Midnight in Paris is the way he (Allen) identifies with Gil's idealization of the past, of the Paris that represented art and life at their fullest.
  73. The specter of war haunts Cold Mountain, but you remember it for the heat of its romantic yearning and the mysteries that wrap themselves around you until you're lost in another world.
  74. It'll slap on a smile on your face that won't quit.
  75. What If doesn't break new ground. But it has charm to spare, and Radcliffe and Kazan are irresistible. No ifs about it.
  76. Yes, it's in French with English subtitles. Don't worry. Nothing gets lost in translation as this coming-of-age tale brims over with humor, heartbreak and ravishing romance.
  77. Eastwood's modest approach to these momentous events shames the usual Hollywood showboating. In a rare achievement, he's made a film that truly is good for the soul.
  78. It feels lived it, honest and painfully funny.
  79. No list of the year's best performances should be made without her (Sally Hawkins).
  80. Moore's fireball of a movie could change your life. It had me laughing with tears in my eyes.
  81. You don't have to be in vogue to enjoy this stylish ride through Bergdorf's. It's a surprise package to die for. Miele and his virtuoso cinematographer, Justin Bare, show how fashion can be aspiration, a model for dreaming the impossible.
  82. A fiercely funny human comedy with jokes that sting and leave marks.
  83. Sound plays as crucial a role as visuals in replicating an authentic culture to drive the storytelling.
  84. Director-writer Martin Hynes shapes his first movie into something emotionally truthful, painfully funny and vibrantly alive. It's a near-perfect road movie, since you don't want the ride to end.
  85. An artistic triumph.
  86. Little Men, with its two boys racing at life with the brick wall of maturity still at a distance, is funny, touching and vital. It's truly an exhilarating gift.
  87. Top Five is Rock's best movie by a mile. It's authentically hilarious.
  88. I've seen A Mighty Wind only twice so far. Maybe it is less fresh than "Guffman," more strained than "Best in Show." Who cares? It's still a gift from comedy heaven.
  89. Farmiga expertly guides a large and gifted ensemble cast and proves as fearless a director as she is an actress. She lights up Higher Ground and makes it funny, touching and vital.
  90. When it flies, it soars.
  91. Nothing can detract from the film as a portrait of hell so shattering it's impossible to shake.
  92. Dark secrets are unlocked, words draw more blood than punches, and Desplechin turns one family into a universe that resembles life as a startling work of art.
  93. By stooping low without selling out, this babes-and-bullets tour de force gets you high on movies again.
  94. A hell of a hilarious time at the movies if you're up for laughs that stick in your throat.
  95. Bouchareb's film helped shame the French government into raising pensions for more than 80,000 of these veterans. Here's that rare movie that really did change things. I'll be damned.
  96. Kelly Reichardt makes films that unfold at the speed of life, not Hollywood. She's a poet of the space between words, and the hypnotic and haunting Certain Women presents the writer-director at her artfully attentive best.
  97. What Robert Downey, Jr. is to "Iron Man" and Ryan Reynolds is to "Deadpool" – that's what Benedict Cumberbatch is to Doctor Strange. By that I mean, he's everything.
  98. The Raid 2 lets its warriors rip for two and a half thrilling hours. With the precision of dance and the punch of a KO champion, Evans keeps the action coming like nobody's business. The wow factor is off the charts.

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