Rolling Stone's Scores

For 3,068 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Player
Lowest review score: 0 Vampire Academy
Score distribution:
3068 movie reviews
  1. A marvel of delicacy and humor.
    • Rolling Stone
  2. Wilson is flat-out hilarious, playing this cowboy like a surfer dude zapped back in time.
    • Rolling Stone
  3. The film is alive with delicacy and feeling...It's a beauty.
  4. Elegantly witty and haunting . . . McKellen gives the performance of his career . . . and Brendan Fraser excels.
    • Rolling Stone
  5. Ali
    Ali is a bruiser, unwieldy in length and ambition. But Mann and Smith deliver this powerhouse with the urgency of a champ's left hook.
  6. Delivers frisky fun for bruised romantics regardless of age, sex or nationality.
  7. Watching De Niro take Paul through his first panic attack ("I'm crying like a woman") is an unalloyed joy.
  8. A riveting and surprisingly romantic ride.
  9. Steadily engrossing and devilishly funny, and, o brother, does it look sharp.
  10. Incisively witty, provocative and acted to perfection, this sublime entertainment is a career peak for producer Ismail Merchant, director James Ivory and screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala.
  11. A movie heart-breaker of oddball wit and startling grace.
  12. A personal best for producer Jerry Bruckheimer, a triumph for Scott and a war film of prodigious power. You will be shaken.
  13. It's a role of fierce demands, and Rampling meets them all. In a summer of crass, Rampling is a true class act.
  14. It may sound silly, but Lord and Park conjure up a world of visual miracles.
    • Rolling Stone
  15. The challenge is exhilarating. You can discover a lot about yourself by getting lost in Mulholland Drive. It grips you like a dream that won't let go.
  16. As heartfelt as it is hilarious.
    • Rolling Stone
  17. You won't forget this film -- it's devastating.
  18. The year's most beguilling and touching surprise. Bravo.
    • Rolling Stone
  19. The first commandment of Dogma: Thou shalt not stop laughing.
    • Rolling Stone
  20. A movie that advances the career of a demonstrably gifted filmmaker, a fearlessly funny movie whose laughs draw blood, a bracingly provocative movie that won't apologize for its bad temper.
  21. A bright burst of action and comedy with a cast that makes for rousing good company.
  22. Tadpole may be small, but it's something special -- a cheeky comedy knockout.
  23. The acting is top-notch, and LaPaglia, who makes the cop's torment palpable, gives the performance of his career.
  24. A dynamite bundle from British writer-director Guy Ritchie. Even when the accents are as indecipherable as the plot, Ritchie keeps the action percolating and the humor on high.
  25. Nunez finds a striking lyricism in simple lives that inspires an uncommonly fine cast and ranks him as a world-class filmmaker.
  26. Offers something magical in the haunting and hypnotic performance of Sarah Polley...(the film) cuts deep.
    • Rolling Stone
  27. A tornado of laughs based on the black experience as lived by these four insightful jokers, instead of as filtered through the Hollywood formula.
    • Rolling Stone
  28. "Waves" is a spellbinder.
  29. This hilarious and humane film nails its subject -- not just the unshaved armpits and the lack of underwear -- and marks Moodysson as a talent to watch.
  30. Unique and unforgettable.
  31. Detractors will see the usual parade of repressed feelings in a Masterpiece Theatre setting. Those who look closer will find one of the best films of the year.
  32. Waggish fun like this is too good to miss.
    • Rolling Stone
  33. Lane is a force of nature. Her slow-burning, fiercely erotic performance charges the movie.
  34. Setting it against the backdrop of a wanton city under siege, Schroeder crafts a film of whiplash urgency.
  35. It's a haunting, hypnotic film that exerts an escalating grip on the heart and the conscience.
    • Rolling Stone
  36. An uneven movie that nonetheless bristles with stinging wit and exerts a perverse fascination.
    • Rolling Stone
  37. Mitchell gives this post-punk, neo-glam rock extravaganza everything in his loaded arsenal of talents. He gets the sound right, the look right, the fun right and - this is crucial - the pain right.
  38. Let the unsettling secrets of this outrageously funny and steadily engrossing meditation on the life of two high school misfits after graduation catch you by surprise. It's that good.
  39. It's unmissable, flaws and all, because riveting suspense spiced with diabolical laughs and garnished with a sprig of kinky romance add up to the tastiest dish around.
  40. Begins like an episode of "I Love Lucy" and ends with the impact of "Easy Rider."
  41. Before this trippy, mesmerizing movie swerves out of control, it delivers an exhilarating and challenging ride.
  42. Get your titles straight -- this is the good one, and a roaring good time.
    • Rolling Stone
  43. Irresistibly deranged.
    • Rolling Stone
  44. A uniquely hypnotic and haunting love story sparked by Nicolas Cage and Elisabeth Shue at their career best.
    • Rolling Stone
  45. The crazy-ass imagination at work in Being John Malkovich hits you like a blast of pure oxygen...this movie of constant astonishments will make you laugh hard and long.
    • Rolling Stone
  46. A maliciously funny and keenly observant movie -- director-writer Patrick Stettner makes a potent feature debut -- that serves its humor dark and without artificial sweeteners.
  47. Instead of the easy attitudinizing that is the default position for teen comedies, Gimme the Loot fills each frame with raw talent and exuberance.
  48. Nightcrawler curves and hisses its way into your head with demonic skill. When the laughs come, they stick in your throat. This is a deliciously twisted piece of work. And Gyllenhaal, coiled and ready to spring, is scarily brilliant. He truly is a monster for our time.
  49. The film belongs to Jolie. She won an Oscar for 1999's "Girl, Interrupted," but this is by far her best performance.
  50. This may be one of the few rockumentaries since Stop Making Sense to tap the cinematic potential of sound and vision in a way that feels genuinely collaborative and borderline transcendental.
  51. It's the work of a major talent. Apatow scores by crafting the film equivalent of a stand-up routine that encompasses the joy, pain, anger, loneliness and aching doubt that go into making an audience laugh.
  52. It's the classic American tale of the family man triumphant, and Howard makes sure that it hits you right in the heart.
  53. It's warped and wonderfully effervescent. Ditto the songs by Danny Elfman, who sings the role of Bonejangles, the frontman for a skeleton jazz band at a swinging underworld club. Best of all is the love story.
  54. The fierce and funny film version has been directed by Texan Richard Linklater (Slacker, Dazed and Confused, Before Sunrise) with rare grace and compassion.
  55. Just for starters, no movie about the Dutch Resistance during World War II has any right to be this wildly entertaining, not to mention this provocative and potently erotic.
  56. Jones is a marvel. Sundance couldn't get enough of her. You won't, either. Her performance grabs hold and won't let go.
  57. Ray
    Jamie Foxx gets so far inside the man and his music that he and Ray Charles seem to breathe as one.
  58. Shot with a surrealist's eye for madness and destruction by the great cinematographer Matthew Libatique, Mother! always seems on the verge of exploding. Your head will feel the same way. And I mean that as a compliment.
  59. For those who don't believe that truth trumps fiction for whacked-out depravity, mark this shockingly fierce and funny spellbinder as Exhibit A.
  60. Shrek 2 may be computer-generated, but its innate heart and glorious sense of mischief make it one of the best and most humane movies of the summer.
  61. This seriously funny movie, artfully photographed by the great Roger Deakins, is spiritual in nature, barbed in tone, and, oh, yeah, it stings like hell.
  62. Eastwood grabs the reins and draws Costner's scrappiest performance since Bull Durham. In going beyond chase-yarn duty, Eastwood and Costner do themselves proud.
  63. It's a feast of smart, sexy, glorious talk. The Oscar for best foreign film belongs right here.
  64. Brimming with humor and heartbreak, Slumdog Millionaire meets at the border of art and commerce and lets one flow into the other as if that were the natural order of things.
  65. Powered by a transfixing Portman, Larrain's film – one of the year's best – is appropriately hard to pin down and impossible to forget.
  66. Now this is what I call a summer movie. Baby Driver has it all: thrills, laughs, sex, nonstop action, a killer soundtrack, a star-making performance from Ansel Elgort and a director – Edgar Wright – who can knock the wind out of you.
  67. Immensely entertaining and provocative.
  68. You may have doubts about which side to choose, but there's no doubt about this mind-bender. It'll pin you to your seat.
  69. Tone-deaf but thunderously exciting.
  70. Kudrow's Michele is a deadpan delight as she joins fellow misfit Romy (a deliciously funny Mira Sorvino).
  71. McNaughton has made a film of clutching terror that's meant to heighten our awareness instead of dulling it. At the end, Henry is still out there among us. And he's no B-movie monster in a hockey mask. He could be the guy next door. This film gives off a dark chill that follows you all the way home.
  72. Here’s a powerhouse of a documentary that makes you feel mad as hell and unwilling to take it anymore.
  73. Don't miss it. Though Life Itself is a warts-and-all portrait Ebert didn't live to review, my guess is his thumbs would be shooting upward. Mine sure are.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A marvel of letting an antihero's restless wanderings dictate the terms of the story, Pieces doesn't explain its lead's ennui so much as honors it.
  74. A dynamite film that ranks with the year's best.
  75. Appaloosa is gripping entertainment that keeps springing surprises.
  76. Cyrus, the summer's best, most original and crazily inventive comedy, is potently funny and painfully real.
  77. For some, the silver linings in Russell’s movies represent a failure to embrace darkness. I see them as a humanist’s act of resistance. That’s why American Hustle ranks with the year’s best movies. It gets under your skin.
  78. A joy to behold.
  79. This unnervingly funny and quietly devastating film -- director Todd Field's first since his smash 2001 debut with "In the Bedroom" -- pulls you in like a magnetic-force field.
  80. Down in the Valley is a wild thing that sticks with you long after it's over. You know, a real movie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Parenthood, heartfelt and howlingly comic, also comes spiced with risk and mischief. Just when you fear the movie might be swept away on a tidal wave of wholesomeness, a line, a scene or a performance poke through to restore messy, perverse reality.
  81. A jolt-a-minute horroshow laced with racial tension and stinging satirical wit.
  82. Glorious entertainment.
  83. Director Fernando Meirelles and screenwriter Jeffrey Caine put a human face on John le Carre's novel of sex, lies and dirty politics in modern Africa. Prepare for a thrilling ride.
  84. It will hook you good and keep you riveted.
  85. Blue Is the Warmest Color sweeps you up on waves of humor, heartbreak and ravishing romance.
  86. What's lucky is that no matter what language it's in, My Life as Zucchini never sacrifices what’s true for what’s trite and easier to sell. This is animation as an art form, inspiring and indelible.
  87. The Hangover ain't art, but Phillips has shaped the hardcore hilarity into the summer party movie of all our twisted dreams.
  88. It's a modern horror story that gets you where you live.
  89. It's a wow of a thriller with a soul that isn't computer generated. Poitras may be guilty of taking Snowden at face value, but she succeeds brilliantly in evoking a shadow villain intent on world domination. Big Brother is back, baby, and he's gone digital.
  90. You watch The Wrestler (with a superb title song from Bruce Springsteen) in a state of pure exhilaration. A great actor in a great movie will do that to you.
  91. Blue Caprice is a cinematic punch to the gut, a mind-bending meditation on how to mold a killer, and one of the most potent and provocative true-crime movies ever made.
  92. Artfully exciting and compulsively watchable even at a butt-numbing 152 minutes, the film makes good on the promise New Zealand writer-director Andrew Dominik showed with "Chopper" in 2000.
  93. Lasseter is back behind the wheel, and you can feel his love for all things automotive in every frame. No humans blot this anthropomorphic romp. Cars do all the talking.
  94. Zemeckis springs so many pow 3-D surprises you'll think Beowulf is your own private fun house.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Ronin represents an exhilarating return to form for Frankenheimer.
  95. Down in the mud with the guys, Moore finds the heart of her character and a career beyond vanity and hype. She's never looked better.
  96. A gorgeously acted, written and directed spellbinder.
  97. The ending -- a more devastating surprise than "The Village" could manage -- caps eighty sweat-job minutes of imaginative, jolting suspense.

Top Trailers