Rolling Stone's Scores

For 2,867 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Invasion of the Body Snatchers
Lowest review score: 0 Transformers: Dark of the Moon
Score distribution:
2867 movie reviews
  1. Writer-director Olivier Assayas crafts a near perfect blend of humor and heartbreak, a lyrical masterwork that measures loss in terms practical and evanescent.
  2. A devastating mystery thriller from Quebec filmmaker Denis Villeneuve that grabs you hard and won't let go.
  3. Gere gives 'em the old razzle-dazzle with his roguish charm and sharp comic timing. The surprise is the unexpected feeling he brings to this challenging role.
  4. The film's sound design, sampling Beethoven and Nino Rota, among others, links up with visual miracles performed by Rain Kathy Li and Wong Kar-Wai's noted cinematographer, Christopher Doyle (In the Mood for Love), to take us inside Alex's head. The result, a defiant slap at slick Hollywood formula, is mesmerizing.
  5. You can laugh with Maps to the Stars, but you can't laugh it off. Prepare to be knocked for a loop.
  6. Bird has crafted a film -- one of the year's best -- that doesn't ring cartoonish, it rings true.
  7. The movie, from the 1992 best seller by Olivia Goldsmith, isn't deathless art. But as pure entertainment, this witty revenge romp is sinfully satisfying.
  8. Thanks to some of the greatest battle scenes ever filmed, Gibson once again shows his staggering gifts as a filmmaker, able to juxtapose savagery with aching tenderness.
  9. Throbs with action, suspense and a seductive rhythm all its own.
  10. Through haunting home movies, Mina's diaries and interviews with Mike, a raw, riveting portrait emerges of what a child sees in his parents' relationship and what lies beneath.
  11. The film sneaks up on you, quiet-like, until its implications accumulate. And then it crushes you.
  12. Mud
    In the hands of Nichols, Mud emerges as a thing of bruised beauty. There's magic in it.
  13. Witherspoon has nailed it before, notably in "Election," but her portrayal of June is astounding in its vitality and richness.
  14. McGrath's script is faithful: fierce when it needs to be and devilishly funny.
  15. Everything in this movie is so ripe and voluptuous that watching it doesn't seem enough, you want to take a bite out of it.
  16. Watson and Everett, both superb, bring ferocity and feeling to their roles. But the one you won't forget is Wilkinson (In the Bedroom) in a towering performance of grace and grit that deserves to put him on Oscar's shortlist. Good show.
  17. A crafty calling card brimming with beauty and terror. Eggers pulls us into the supernatural with subtle cunning and meticulous attention to detail.
  18. Without pushing or showing off, Miller creates a breezy comedy that pulls you up short. Buoyed by faultless actors who mesh beautifully, Maggie's Plan tickles you with laughs that can — suddenly or even days later — choke you up with emotion.
  19. Rudolph, a comic force on "SNL," can speak volumes with the tilt of an eyebrow. She and Krasinski, of "The Office," are absolutely extraordinary. Ditto the film, which sneaks up and floors you.
  20. There are bumps along the way, transitions from one medium to another will do that, but this filmmaker and his fierce foursome won't be done till they take a piece out of you. It's a gripping psychological thriller with a sting in its tail.
  21. Eastwood, working from a script that Jason Hall adapted from Kyle's 2012 memoir, fuses the explosive and the sorrowful as only he can. That's why his film takes a piece out of you.
  22. The sad fact is that racial injustice is timelier than ever. Righteous fury is in the air. And that fervor to stand up and be counted is all over Selma.
  23. The movie comes at you in a whoosh, like a volcano of creative ideas in full eruption.
  24. Director Tim Burton finally hooks the one that got away: a script that challenges and deepens his visionary talent.
  25. It's a movie as timely as it is thrilling to watch.
  26. Jolie has an army of craftsmen in her corner, notably camera poet Roger Deakins (No Country for Old Men). But it's her vision that gives Unbroken a spirit that soars. In honoring Louis' endurance, she does herself proud.
  27. The action, from lightsaber duels to X-wing dogfights with TIE Fighters, is explosive and buoyed by John Williams' exultant score. And the movie is also funny as hell. Abrams knows how to build a laugh and fill the emotional spaces between words.
  28. It'll knock you on you ass from laughing when you're not rubbing your eyes in disbelief.
  29. War Horse gets to you. It's one from the heart.
  30. Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams give two of the most explosive and emotionally naked performances you will see anywhere. Just know you're in for a workout.
  31. Rehab movies nearly always make me cringe, as if the audience needs to take medicine, as if hope needs to be force fed. Short Term 12, an exceptional film in every way, breaks the mold.
  32. Adams, her face a reflection of conflicting emotions, is simply stellar in an Oscar-buzzed performance of amazing grit and grace. Without her, Arrival might be too cerebral to warm up to. With her, the film gets inside your head and emerges as something intimate and epic, a linguistics odyssey through space and time. It's the stuff that dreams are made of.
  33. Eating can be one dangerous business. Don't take another bite till you see Robert Kenner's Food, Inc., an essential, indelible documentary that is scarier than anything in the last five Saw horror shows.
  34. Just watch the magnificent Manville, in a raw and riveting award-class performance that exposes a grieving heart under siege. Her last scene is quietly devastating. So is this intimate miracle of a movie.
  35. Bana is magnificent in the role.
  36. An Education is remarkable for the traps it doesn't fall into. Jenny, for all her naive impulses, isn't a victim.
  37. Ascher's unique and unforgettable film is a tribute to movie love. I couldn't have liked it more.
  38. A whole summer of fireworks packed into one movie. It doesn't just go to 11, it starts there.
  39. A visual marvel that cuts a direct path to the heart.
  40. The movie is a small miracle, lifted by Ruffalo and these two remarkable young actresses. Refusing to soften the edges when Cam is off his meds, Ruffalo is a powerhouse. He and Forbes craft an indelibly intimate portrait of what makes a family when the roles of parent and child are reversed.
  41. It promotes an awareness of ALS that goes beyond the best-intended any ice-bucket challenge — and ranks as a profound achievement.
  42. Is it that scary? Yes. Will it reduce you to quivering jelly? Oh, my, yes! Does it bust the bonds of the Godzilla formula to fuse fright with feeling? Better believe it, dudes.
  43. Catherine O'Hara is comic perfection as Marilyn Hack.
  44. One for the time capsule.
  45. Graduation, isn't quite on the landmark level of his searing 2007 abortion drama "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days," but this gripping film still sizzles with Mungiu's social-realist concern for people who believe they can't raise their position based on merit alone. In that sense, the filmmaker is working on a universal level.
  46. Kidman gives the most emotionally bruising performance of her career in Dogville, a movie that never met a cliche it didn't stomp on.
  47. Sing Street is the most romantic movie you'll find anywhere these days, brimming over with music, fun and the thrill of first love.
  48. Affleck and Hall make this unlikely love story palpably moving. And Renner (The Hurt Locker) is dynamite - he radiates ferocity and feeling.
  49. Damned if this wildly witty and surprisingly touching swing at movie madness and gender politics isn't on to something deep.
  50. Kudos to Abrams for going bigger without going stupid. His set pieces, from an erupting volcano to the hell unleashed over London and Frisco Bay, are doozies. So's the movie. It's crazy good.
  51. Sweet is not how Schumer wants Trainwreck to go down. She wants to explode rom-com clichés and replace them with something fierce and ready to rumble. Done.
  52. There's more killer suspense and shocking intimacy in this one-of-a-kind documentary than you'll find in a dozen thrillers. You'll laugh hard and cry too.
  53. Fanaticism is Dannelly's target, not faith. That's what makes his film a keeper: It sticks with you.
  54. Based on the bestseller by Bauman and Bret Witter and blessed with a nuanced script by John Pollono, the film makes sure that tears, when they come, are fully earned.
  55. The melancholy attached to the impermanence of life and love suffuses this film, making it memorably haunting and hypnotic.
  56. Two men alone create an epic landscape of feeling in one of the very best movies of the year.
  57. Guardians of the Galaxy does the impossible. Through dazzle and dumb luck, it turns the clichés of comic-book films on their idiot heads and hits you like an exhilarating blast of fun-fun-fun. It's insanely, shamelessly silly – just one reason to love it.
  58. I lost it just watching Corky show off such memorabilia as "My Dinner With Andre" action figures and a "Remains of the Day" lunch box. Priceless.
  59. Rogen and Heigl step up to the plate with a tougher task from Coach Apatow: Nail every laugh and the emotions underlying them. No worries. They knock it out of the park.
  60. You won't see more explosive acting this year.
  61. Straight Outta Compton plays better when it's outside the box, showing us N.W.A power and the consequences of abusing it. Would the movie be better if it didn't sidestep the band's misogyny, gay-bashing and malicious infighting? No shit. But what stands is an amazement, an electrifying piece of hip-hop history that speaks urgently to right now.
  62. Why We Fight deserves high praise for making it that much tougher to wear blinders.
  63. It's Morgan's core script, full of humor, heartache and verbal fireworks, that lifts Rush above the "Fast & Furious" herd.
  64. Day-Lewis is smashing as the man caught between his emotions and the social ethic. Not since Olivier in "Wuthering Heights" has an actor matched piercing intelligence with such imposing good looks and physical grace.
  65. It sounds like rom-com hell. And it would be if Gandolfini and Louis-Dreyfus weren't such an appealing pair of misfits. It's a pleasure just to watch them spar.
  66. It's been a long time since intellectual sparring created such excitement onscreen. I've heard a few critics dismiss this mind-bender as hopelessly old-hat. Ha! If so, long live retro. ​
  67. Without jerking tears or reducing the acid content of his wit, Baumbach's humane movie gets under your skin.
  68. Lots of movies are labeled as "inspirational" – Hidden Figures truly earns the right to the term.
  69. Gone Baby Gone is full of dark secrets, and how they unravel will keep you glued.
  70. This is a film in which ideas resonate as well as action. Gandalf’s words to Pippin about death have a muscular poetry.
  71. Using Staunton's face as his canvas, Leigh crafts a powerfully moving film that is unmissable and unforgettable.
  72. Baumbach, in his most compassionate film since The Squid and the Whale, catches Frances in the act of inventing herself. It's a glorious sight to see.
  73. Some will write off Prisoners as shameless exploitation. But like Clint Eastwood's "Mystic River," to which it's been compared, Prisoners is so artfully shaped and forcefully developed that objections fade.
  74. Unabashedly hokey, but would you want it any other way? In an era of cynical junk (did anyone say “Bad Boys II”?), Ross restores the good name of crowd-pleasing.
  75. Lin is a talent to watch. There's a sting to this film that gets to you.
  76. The explosive V for Vendetta is powered by ideas that are not computer-generated. It's something rare in Teflon Hollywood: a movie that sticks with you.
  77. The movie will wipe you out. Schnabel's previous two films (Basquiat, Before Night Falls) also focused on artists. But this is his best film yet, a high-wire act of visual daring and unquenchable spirit.
  78. Yup, it could have been a bucket of bleak. But the electric talent of Harrelson and Moverman is too exciting to be anything but exhilarating.
  79. No crime film in years boasts a cooler vibe than Michael Mann's dazzling Collateral.
  80. Darroussin is killer good and director Cedric Kahn turns Georges Simenon's seminal novel into a darkly comic spellbinder that pins you to your seat.
  81. This you-are-there spellbinder is a master director shining his light on the best rock band on the planet.
  82. A wickedly smart and funny free-for-all, and sassy enough to shoot well-aimed darts at corporate branding.
  83. If you're looking for a crime story that sizzles with action, sex and the visceral jolt of life on the edge, Miami Vice is the one.
  84. I, Daniel Blake, a new Loach landmark which won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival last year, sums up everything that has kept he muckraking motor running for decades.
  85. Director Ron Howard has turned Peter Morgan's stage success into a grabber of a movie laced with tension, stinging wit and potent human drama.
  86. Call it the black "Scarface" or "the Harlem Godfather" or just one hell of an exciting movie.
  87. Wayne Kramer, who co-wrote the scrappy script with Frank Hannah, makes a potent directing debut and strikes gold with the cast.
  88. Chases so many ideas that it threatens to spin out of control. But with our multiplexes stuffed with toxic Hollywood formula, it's a gift to find a ballsy movie that thinks it can do anything, and damn near does.
  89. Unique and unmissable.
  90. It might have all been another Hollywood-formula flick with American might taking on the alien other. But Greengrass gives Phillips and Muse the time, aboard a covered lifeboat, to discover shared beliefs and fears.
  91. Powley is sensational, expertly blending hilarity and heartbreak. Her scenes with Wiig, sublime in her hard-won gravity, are unique and unforgettable. Just like the movie.
  92. Gordon-Levitt won't take safe for an answer. So Don Jon tends to stumble as it finds its feet. Still, you leave this movie feeling had at instead of had. The experience is elating.
  93. Deliberate, demanding and character-driven, Michael Clayton flies in the face of what sells at the multiplex. I couldn't have liked it more.
  94. It's implausible as hell, but no less fun for that.
  95. Nicole Kidman is just astonishing in Rabbit Hole - subtle, fierce, brutally funny, tender when you least expect it, and battered by the feelings that hit her when she forgets to duck.
  96. The movie is a world-class winner.
  97. Some movies are so good and true and tough-to-the-core they should just sneak up on you. James White is one of them.
  98. Despite its grandiose title, 20th Century Women unfolds as series of small moments – some hilarious and heartfelt, other silly and sorrowful – that help define the characters and their time.
  99. Like the A.R. Rahman score that drives the movie, the triumphant 127 Hours pays fitting tribute to Aron by being thrillingly alive.
  100. The movie of Fences doesn't need Hollywood bells and whistles. This writer, this director and these actors are all the magnificence required to grab your attention and hold it.

Top Trailers