Rolling Stone's Scores

For 4,074 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Sea Change
Lowest review score: 0 Know Your Enemy
Score distribution:
4,074 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Reflektor is closer to turning-point classics such as U2's Achtung Baby and Radiohead's Kid A--a thrilling act of risk and renewal by a band with established commercial appeal and a greater fear of the average, of merely being liked.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    "Here we go to the main course!" ad-libs Van Morrison on an extended "Caravan," one of the shaggy outtakes on this five-disc unpacking of the Belfast bard's 1970 jazzy-pop masterpiece. That LP is nearly all main course, and if the numerous alternate takes here often feel incomplete without their sublime, brassy final arrangements, they compensate with intimacy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The cumulative effect of this mass of old, borrowed, blue and renewed – covers, recent outtakes and redefining takes on two classics--is retrospect with a cutting edge, running like one of the singer's epic look-ma-no-set-list gigs: full of surprises, all with a reason for being there.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The result is a set that feels like an instant folk-rock classic.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Turn Blue is a genuine turning point--into a decisively original rock, with a deeper shade of blues.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Oasis' debut remains one of the most gloriously loutish odes to cigarettes, alcohol and dumb guitar solos that the British Isles have ever coughed up. This deluxe three-disc reissue captures the madness of the Gallagher brothers' early days.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Made and issued between the falls of 1968 and 1970, the original LPs mark Zeppelin's rapid progression out of British R&B and psychedelia into a crushing-riff rock of unprecedented dynamic range, embedded with details from Fifties rockabilly and Celtic and Appalachian folk, blown open with volcanic improvising.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    II was still tied to straight-blues sources (the Willie Dixon elements in "Whole Lotta Love"). But the alternate takes highlight Robert Plant's ripening vocal poise and, in a rough mix of "Ramble On," the decisive, melodic force of John Paul Jones' bass and John Bonham's drumming.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    CSNY 1974 may be the closest we'll come to hearing a mid-Seventies reunion album from this band.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As with the reissue of the group's fourth album, Page has impeccably restored the glimmer of Houses of the Holy and uncovered an LP's worth of fascinating outtakes that show the band's headspace at the time.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Taken together, it's a comprehensive document of a great band with endless secrets to reveal, even now.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Black Messiah shows how deep easy can go. D'Angelo and his band have built an avant-soul dream palace to get lost in, for 56 minutes of heaven.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ()
    This impressive follow-up sounds remarkably similar -- it's just packaged more pretentiously.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Powerful, beautiful, sensual and activist, this is the record Prince keeps trying to make.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Surrounding herself with the cream of Southern bluegrass musicians -- dobro master Jerry Douglas and guitar prodigy Bryan Sutton among them -- Parton is by turns reflective ("Little Sparrow"), playful ("Marry Me"), dolorous ("My Blue Tears"), spirited ("I Don't Believe You've Met My Baby") and spiritual ("In the Sweet By and By") on this nearly hour-long modern-bluegrass tour de force.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Basement Jaxx refine their broad influences into a creative energy you can feel: The art of their noise supples as much dance motivation as their beats.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Everything here is all programmed refinement, stylish melodies and vocal fireworks.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Martsch and his bandmates (bassist Brett Nelson and drummer Scott Plouf) continue to make dense, driving rock with good old-fashioned chords and melodies, and for this we should all be grateful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hilton and Garza explore foreign cultures with wide-eyed curiosity and a taste for the unexpected.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His beautiful detachment makes these nondescript hooks -- so plain they'd be forgettable if sung by anyone else -- into something special.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brainwashed is a warm, frank goodbye, a remarkably poised record about the reality of dying, by a man on the verge.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Burke is the rare singer who makes songwriters sound wise beyond their words -- he finds ache lying dormant in unlikely places and manages to pinpoint, with GPS accuracy, the murky emotional terrain within the lyrics.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A unified set of shadows, isolated hurt laid out in fine rainy-day garage-demo psychedelia.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The first few tunes are instant, and all stay with you.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pig Lib is Malkmus' loosest set of songs ever, an elegantly meandering head trip underpinned by the kind of tuneful, world-wise romanticism that's won him the hearts of English majors everywhere.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If their recent studio work has been distinguished by additive, layer-by-layer composition, in concert Radiohead's magic comes from subtraction: The elegy "Like Spinning Plates" relies almost entirely on Yorke's famously anguished voice.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hearing twenty-one Lynch-penned songs back to back gets exhausting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a final statement from one of the most important artists of the last decade, it's not exactly earth-shattering. But this eclectic, personal and heartfelt Scarecrow is still outstanding in its field.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There isn't much music on your radio dial that sounds so quintessentially bittersweet; the Jayhawks' old-fashioned gift is that they can make being lost sound sort of nice.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gray's pipes aren't for everyone, but if you can't stomach them, I feel for you. You're missing some of the best soul on the planet.