Rolling Stone's Scores

For 4,074 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 SMiLE
Lowest review score: 0 Scream
Score distribution:
4,074 music reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They actually took the time to make a totally crunk geek-punk record, buzzing through ten excellent tunes in less than half an hour with zero filler and enough psychosexual contortions to buy Cuomo's shrink another hot tub.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Black Cherry is both retro and futuristic, like vintage synth pop heard through a wall of distortion. [15 May 2003, p.134]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Just when new metal seemed utterly played out, Deftones blows open the possibilities.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the face of hysterical expectation, the Strokes have resisted the temptation to hit the brakes, grow up and screw around with a sound that doesn't need fixing -- yet.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kweli smoothly bridges the physical and the political.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's not that Come With Us doesn't rock like a jet engine in a jewel case - it does - but it's more striking for the moments when a warped loveliness, like the icy, phased harpsichord gusts of "Pioneer Skies," wafts up and out from among the roar of the sirens and sequencers.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For now, the Strokes have mastered their style; they have yet to come up with the substance to match it.... But the music leaves no doubts - more joyful and intense than anything else I've heard this year.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The evidence here suggests the Sleepy Jackson could make a great punk album, or a great country album, or a great psychedelic album. Instead, they've simply made a great album, and one of the best debuts of the year.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The songwriting marries the band's penchant for recalling its wide-ranging influences (Neil Young, CCR, Mission of Burma) with a casual, off-the-cuff air that belies the meticulous craft underneath.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Waits' ravaged voice surrendered all pretensions to melody ages ago; his throat is now pure theater, a weapon of pictorial emphasis and raw honesty.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A near-perfect balance of gutter grime and high-art aspiration, the Rick Rubin-produced By the Way continues the Peppers' slow-motion makeover.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the anger and bitterness, Hail to the Thief is more musically inviting than Radiohead's last two outings.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A Mark is the first time he's let the musical intensity match the lyrics.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A luxuriant union of black-ice electronics and chamber-pop instrumentation. [14 Oct 2004, p.98]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    3D
    The album isn't the romp it might have been had Lopes survived, but 3D solidly embodies black pop in a year in which it has lacked a center.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Greendale has a tattered, buzzing, demolike sound, rude as any Young has put out.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Most of the collaborators turn up only as backup vocalists or orchestra members, enabling Lightbody's heartbreaking ballads and sublime baritone to soar.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ten New Songs manages to sustain loss's fragile beauty like never before and might just be the Cohen's most exquisite ode yet to the midnight hour.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where the album truly shines though is in the way Armstrong gets the most of his vocalists.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It feels like one big loft party, even when it veers into psychotic, dissonant No Wave by DNA and Mars.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album's wanton schizophonia results in such a switched-on pileup of styles that Groove Armada have earned their own rubric -- call it electrocrash, and consider it great.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The ebb and flow of eighteen concise, contrasting cuts writes a story about Moby's beautifully conflicted interior world while giving the outside planet beats and tunes on which to groove.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An earthy, moving psychedelia, eleven iridescent-country songs about surviving a blown mind and a broken heart.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Somehow, the Primals' fury never seems misguided: This is one ball of aggression that hangs together, thanks to the band's smarts and funk.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Earthy, impressively diverse. [28 Oct 2004, p.101]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Let Go is an excellent rainy-afternoon album, full of gentle and melancholic beauty, with echoes of Love and the Beach Boys.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sing the Sorrow is not exactly a concept album, but it does have a singleness of dark purpose that builds in momentum as the disc progresses.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the 1977-79 half of Name, nearly every song beats the studio version. But the 1980-81 disc is the prize, as the Heads take their lofty concepts to the stage with a ten-piece band. [2 Sep 2004, p.147]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Given one last chance to make an impact, Jay-Z has come up with one of the better albums of his career, though perhaps a shade lesser than his very best, Reasonable Doubt and The Blueprint.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even the ballads... bristle with force. [28 Oct 2004, p.99]
    • Rolling Stone