Rolling Stone's Scores

For 4,728 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 To The 5 Boroughs
Lowest review score: 0 Know Your Enemy
Score distribution:
4728 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This collection details the ups and downs of his post-stroke life, without ever sounding depressive or dirgey.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The programming is intermittently suitable for boogaloo, but the breaking sunshine in the melodies and Rundgren's singing deliver on the promise in titles like "Liquid Joy in the Womb of Infinity" and "Wave of Heavy Red (Disko-Nektar)."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is music that is bent on connecting with the dance floor and won't deny itself anything.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Jazz-influenced hip-hop with a sense of humor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Lyrically, history and modern anxiety morph into freedom songs for an age where, then as now, "the enemy is everywhere," and neither whiskey nor "a pretty good GPA" will save you. But an album this excellent just might.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Guy co-wrote just four songs here, but he sings and solos with reliable ferocity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With a painterly command of the palette of sound and a fondness for the sweet melody of a lullaby, Harcourt is cousin to multi-instrumental songwriters such as Brian Wilson and Badly Drawn Boy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Smith constructed these from vinyl pressings of live-band grooves he'd composed, and Disc Two is the grooves themselves--which have even more weight and resonance when left alone.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If the songs don't always transcend their references, they rarely feel less than lived.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Sisters always kick ass live, but The Invisible Deck is the first time they've managed to do justice to their tough, slippery, muscular sound in the studio.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    These guys will try anything once--except being boring.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    "Strum it on a Telecaster/Sing it like a train-disaster song," sings Miller. It's a perfect mission statement from four Texans raised on the Beatles and Johnny Cash in equal measures, whose shiny melodies, and fatalistic character studies, do their forefathers proud.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    II
    Singer-guitarist Alex Edkins flirts with full-on nihilism, but there are hooks hidden in the onslaught, and Edkins' fever-pitch angst never feels less than honest.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Over the course of fourteen tracks, Clapton blends virtually every style he's worked in during the past thirty-five years. Whether it will strike your ears as something-for-everyone generosity or a patchy jumble probably depends on how much of a purist you are.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Essence finds Williams returning to the willful intimacy of her earliest records. Laid-back, rock-ish and small in scale, Essence never achieves grandeur but won't particularly alienate the fan for whom her wonders small and large are equally magical.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Alessia Cara's debut EP feel more like a personal manifesto than a party playlist.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The breakthrough record where Calla go from a whisper to a scream.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Eagles' original studio albums were all models of clenched-gleam detail, and Long Road suffers from sprawl.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ferry's voice, even for Earth's maestro of remote-control Sinatra-esque soul, is plainly spectacular.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Every band should mature like the Mogwai lads: still inventive, still challenging themselves and still insanely loud.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Except for the predictable re-entry "Fly Away From Here," Boston's bad boys have jettisoned the sappy ballads and slick producers that fueled recent releases, unveiling a homemade endeavor which recasts the crunch and cadence of vintage Aerosmith.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although Lekman's voice sometimes sounds like Morrissey doing a Kermit the Frog impression, he revels in strong songwriting and brilliant hooks played on steel drums, funky horns and hip-hop bells.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Scattered about this engaging, enigmatic disc is a bit of Dusty in Memphis, a touch of Bobbie Gentry's swamp-country persona, a hint of Prince's instinct for making voices and rhythms sound positively libidinous, and a whole lot of Shelby Lynne.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With Rancid, the band's mix of American thrash minimalism and Brit punk's sound and fury have transcended revivalist mimicry once and for all. The result is a brutally exuberant rock album.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What makes Two Against Nature work isn't its cerebral ellipticity but its stunning musical clarity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    After two albums that were as bland as Simon Cowell's wardrobe, Kellie Pickler turned around her career by following the bad-girl path of fellow reality-show alumna Miranda Lambert, which continues on The Woman I Am.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I'm Staying Out builds on last year's fine debut, While You Weren't Looking, exhibiting more confidence and some adventurous musical turns.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Lightburn's amoebic tenor is still the main attraction: soul crooner one minute, punk shouter the next, he's a prime candidate for rock's next Broadway musical.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Astormy soundtrack to one woman's inner life that swings from acoustic guitars to explosions of layered vocals, electric guitars and the occasional lonely horn or piano.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The well-worn beats ensure the album is good even as they prevent it from being great.