Salon.com's Scores

For 3,082 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The General
Lowest review score: 0 The Replacements
Score distribution:
3082 movie reviews
  1. No director yet has found the best use for Hudson, the role that will tap those terrifying and thrilling reserves that are just lying in wait. But Softley comes closer than anybody has.
  2. If there was ever a testament to the resilience of actors, in the face of a flawed script and wonky direction, The Family Stone is it.
  3. There's nothing unconventional or daring about On_Line, but considering how cheap it undoubtedly was to make, the acting, writing and direction all stand up pretty well; this is more intelligent and better structured than at least half the Hollywood movies I see.
  4. "Gunsmoke" meets "Planet of the Apes" in Martin Scorsese's overlarge, overcooked epic of 19th century Manhattan. You should see it anyway.
  5. Après Vous offers nice sound design and an unfussy presentation of middle-class Paris. It comes and goes with no unpleasant aftertaste.
  6. If The Animal -- co-written by Schneider and Tom Brady -- never quite gets fired up, at least it chugs along efficiently on its mildly inspired ridiculousness.
  7. The movie itself seems to be locked in a kind of adolescence; it never quite blossoms into maturity, into a fully rounded whole.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Scottish comedian Billy Connolly shows ample ability in the role, but he can't locate much charm in the character.
  8. Only half a mess -- and even with all its flaws, it's an enjoyable diversion that shows both respect and affection for the formidable legacy of the "X-Men" comics.
  9. Jurassic World unquestionably “delivers.” It feels like a hit; it offers a professionally crafted blend of blandness, predictability, watered-down cultural commentary and manufactured excitement.
  10. A lovely, faintly sinister travelogue.
  11. Lee Harvey Oswald's guilt or innocence or accomplices are not the point of the film; Stone is more interested in the fact that much about the Kennedy murder is now so shrouded in myth and mystification as to be permanently unknowable, and that that fact alone has gnawed away at the self-confidence of middle-class white America ever since.
  12. The kind of little indie you'll either hate or find impossible to resist. I fall into the latter camp, but can appreciate opposing views.
  13. I think the movie is so restrained, and holds back so much on conventional plot and characterization, that its emotional impact is severely blunted. Nolte is excellent, I suppose, but we've seen this damaged-American-dude shtick from him before.
  14. Condon's tone is gentle and lifeless and at times baffling: The picture is a weird cross between clinical and whimsical.
  15. The chief problem with Thank You for Smoking, isn't that it's over the top; it's that it fits so neatly UNDER the top.
  16. It's essentially a mishmash of random ingredients, not very systematically presented and skewed to flatter its audience's presumed enlightenment.
  17. Just about gets us off the ground on its dreamy, feathery angel wings; it just doesn't have the strength or the stamina to keep us aloft.
  18. It's to Stiller's credit that he can sustain the joke for the length of the movie, but just barely. Ten more minutes of Zoolander would have been 10 minutes too many.
  19. If you're looking for thrills, you should know that you have to wade through a good seven-eighths of the movie before Sade does anything remotely disreputable, and even then it's a rather mechanical bit of business that would have been more effective (and more disturbing) if it had been handled with a bit of humor.
  20. The pleasant surprise when you actually watch Insidious is that it turns out to be a moderately effective suburban-family creep show, majorly in debt to "Poltergeist" and "The Exorcist" and capturing at least a little of their spirit.
  21. Marginally romantic and only the tiniest bit thrilling.
  22. So often loose and funny that you'd have to be pretty stingy not to get some pleasure from it.
  23. It could be funnier, sharper, more probing, but at its best it is sexy, and that's always something to celebrate.
  24. It has, at times, a loopy, edgy humor and moments of genuinely affecting pathos. But somehow the combination doesn't add up to anything.
  25. While the filmmaking overall suffers from a kind of tasteful, low-key blandness, Philip Seymour Hoffman's portrayal of Capote keeps the blood coursing through it. He's the bright, chilling spot of color at the center of an otherwise beige movie.
  26. All of these women, and Day-Lewis too, sing and dance vigorously and enthusiastically throughout Nine, and the results are spotty, though you can't accuse anyone of not trying.
  27. I have to hand it to Hardwicke: I was a lot less bored by The Nativity Story than I feared I'd be.
  28. Prince Caspian is elaborate filmmaking, all right. It's the magic of the human touch that's missing.
  29. Frank Coraci's '80s-nostalgia comedy is predictable and unevenly paced, and it lunges too often for the easy joke.

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