Salon.com's Scores

For 2,987 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Zero Dark Thirty
Lowest review score: 0 Did You Hear About the Morgans?
Score distribution:
2,987 movie reviews
  1. Lacks any layers beyond its own amiable inconsequentiality. It needs the spark of the distinctively American slapstick craziness that has distinguished Frye's previous work.
  2. A limp and dreary experience, at least after you get past its intriguing premise. It's poorly written and woodenly acted, completely formulaic and hopelessly imprisoned by both its genre and finally its form.
  3. Utterly predictable, thoroughly sentimental and -- worse -- not all that funny. It makes your average episode of "Third Rock From the Sun" look like the edgy mutant offspring of John Waters and Ingmar Bergman.
  4. James Cameron disgraces those who died on the Titanic -- again.
  5. It's hard to care about a valiant groping for accuracy when a story is so badly told you can't tell what the devil is going on.
  6. Ultimately feels somewhat overprocessed, and its humor is a little too broad at times -- it probably crosses the acceptable threshold of penis and boob jokes.
  7. I suspect this picture is pretty close to what fans were hoping for, and for their sake, I'm glad it's markedly better than the two that preceded it. But Revenge of the Sith is still crap.
  8. Excessively intricate and extremely dull, the latest example of a filmmaker giving us a disjointed, overlong movie that’s unnecessarily confusing to follow.
  9. Watching The Producers is simply exhausting.
  10. The picture is mildly entertaining and stringently unoffensive (provided you're not a supersensitive upper-crusty type from Connecticut). Yet it has problems from the start.
  11. Too bad it's not so funny. Almost every gag in Black Knight feels forced and contrived, as if the movie is desperate to squeeze laughs out of us.
  12. This initial “Mortal Instruments” picture has the vibe of a straight-to-video release from the mid-‘90s, except with a $60 million budget and considerable special-effects expertise.
  13. Its spectacular special effects threaten to swallow characters whole, and there are times when overwrought and clumsy dialogue... nearly pitch you right out of the movie's mood.
  14. Works neither as an exuberant rock 'n' roll picture nor as a heroic fable. It will rock you --straight to sleep.
  15. The problem with contemporary Hollywood isn't that so many of the movies it's churning out are based on formula; it's that so many directors take perfectly good formulas and wreck them with bad filmmaking.
  16. Parker IS to blame for the self-consciousness of her performance. She spends much of the movie swanning, not acting: Nearly every movement, every gesture, seems conceived for the benefit of the camera, as opposed to the truth of the character.
  17. The Devil's Own isn't the disaster its bad advance publicity might lead you to expect. But it's a disjointed, sluggish picture.
  18. I don't think any of it really hangs together as anything resembling drama, or that Michael is ever a remotely likable character, before or after his day of reckoning. But Adam Sandler didn't get where he is today by making movies for me and Roger Ebert to like.
  19. The problem is that the charm and good spirits of Amélie feel calculated rather than natural.
  20. Unless you like boob jokes and preachy sentimentalism, this comedy isn't funny at all.
  21. When has Woody Allen ever been interested in anything besides Woody Allen? He has no interest in bringing out new sides of his actors. Jim Henson's casts had more spontaneity.
  22. This film's dithering, handsome, morally ambivalent Hamlet, is a profoundly unsatisfactory character.
  23. Feels like every other action thriller we've seen in the past three years, only it's more annoying -- and, in some cases, more appalling -- because it's trying so hard to distinguish itself.
  24. What's missing -- apart, of course, from a plot -- is any character development.
  25. What's offensive in Bringing Down the House is the way the jokes have been calculated not to offend.
  26. Sodden and glum, even in those moments where it's supposed to feel funny and light. It makes you feel trapped and flailing as the minutes tick by. If it encapsulates anything, it's the experience of drowning, not waving.
  27. Feels deeply calculated rather than genuinely crazy.
  28. More of a women's-prison movie than a supernatural thriller, and not a very good one at that.
  29. Pontypool is something like a claustrophobic, locked-in-the-barn zombie movie, only almost without zombies.
  30. The bitterness of her new comedy, Loser, comes as a shock. It's not a mean-spirited movie.

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