San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,768 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Watchmen
Lowest review score: 0 Bio-Dome
Score distribution:
6768 movie reviews
  1. Hardly a riveting experience. It has slow patches, but it has a cumulative effect, thanks equally to Hansen-Love and Huppert. We come away feeling enriched and expanded, without exactly knowing how or why.
  2. That perception of Fiennes and Gustave is central to the whole enterprise. Without it, the movie just breaks off and flies away. But with it, The Grand Budapest Hotel becomes something wonderful.
  3. Make no mistake, Blue Is the Warmest Color constitutes a breakthrough, in addition to being the best film of 2013.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    And there lies the greatest flaw with Citzenfour and Snowden himself. Despite the film’s virtues, we’re no closer to understanding Snowden than we were a year ago when this saga began.
  4. "Human Resources" was a good, straightforward tale, but Time Out is better. It's haunting. It's like a poem.
  5. To say it is about a debilitating disease is as reductive as saying "Little Miss Sunshine" is about a beauty pageant. Both are intimate stories of family ties that bind but sometimes also choke.
  6. Lattuada has adapted a gritty neorealist style to suit his dark comedy and is in full command in the final half hour, when he ups the ante in surprising ways.
  7. There's such a thing as smart angry, and such a thing as stupid angry, and after seeing Inside Job, audiences will be smart angry.
  8. An outstanding effort that maintains the integrity and purpose that distinguished "The Fellowship of the Ring."
  9. It will be the most talked-about comedy of summer.
  10. To members of the Darko cult, this may not be an improvement, but it could help this compelling and extremely moving film find the audience it deserves.
  11. The King's Speech is a warm, wise film - the best period movie of the year and one of the year's best movies.
  12. What Mackenzie has crafted here is a crowd-pleaser with undeniable art-house elements.
  13. Up
    Has some great movie moments but also boring stretches.
  14. Robert Redford's exceptionally handsome and provocative Quiz Show manages a trick that few films even dare try -- to take a hard look at personal and public moral issues and still provide dazzling entertainment.
  15. Aquarius has a lot of things on its mind, and sometimes the plot machinations in the last third seem a tad heavy-handed, almost as if they’re being piled upon a delicate character sketch.
  16. Anomalisa may simply be a brilliant one-off, but it’s pointing a new direction for animation, if anyone cares to follow it.
  17. Jacob Bernstein’s documentary about his mother, Nora Ephron, is unbearably funny for much of the way, and then it is sad, but bearably so because Everything Is Copy is about one woman’s realization that some things in life are more than material for her writing.
  18. The most entertaining movie of the year. Funny and action-packed, it's also got that rare thing, heart.
  19. This is a remarkable feat, not only of cinematography, but of choreography. Just to film Michael Keaton and Edward Norton walking down a Manhattan street, everything had to be timed as in a dance — when the camera swirls ahead, when it goes behind, when it swoops back around. It’s all accomplished so smoothly that it would be worth doing merely as a stunt, except this is no stunt. This method carries the mood and soul of one of the best movies of 2014.
  20. The film, winsome and tragic at once and finely attuned to the rhythms of childhood, always seems quite close to real life.
  21. Life Is Sweet, a comedy with wonderfully touching moments by off-beat British director Mike Leigh, is an absolute gem of eccentric humor about family life. Fresh and quirky, the film dishes up astonishing vitality in its look at what is ostensibly a plain, lower middle-class family in Middlesex. [22 Nov. 1991, p.C5]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  22. For all the squalor and extremely upsetting subject matter, you can't take your eyes off the screen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As Whelan slowly comes to terms with the loss of her identity, she begins to forge a new one as a contemporary dancer, going on to produce her own performances on a national tour titled “Restless Creature.”
  23. Meticulously crafted, and warmly acted by a cast that includes Winona Ryder as Jo and Susan Sarandon as her mother, the devoted Marmee, Little Women is one of the rare Hollywood studio films that invites your attention, slowly and elegantly, rather than propelling your interest with effects and easy manipulation.
  24. Jane is lopsided, thoroughly exploring her early career but encapsulating later decades too neatly.
  25. A heartrending film, Lee's Poetry is indeed a work of art.
  26. Anyone not romantically inclined going into Shakespeare in Love surely will be by the end.
  27. This is a vision of hell conveyed in a simple, documentary style, far removed from the sumptuous American Mafia fables.
  28. Gets its punch from simple scenes and conversations.

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