San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 1,363 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell
Lowest review score: 0 Watching Ellie: Season 2
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 749
  2. Negative: 0 out of 749
749 tv reviews
  1. The show’s structure is smart in many ways, giving us more immediate satisfaction as individual stories play out, while piling on layers of mystery about many of the characters. Kirkman does it so well that we almost miss the fact that several subplots are pretty timeworn.
  2. A few missteps notwithstanding, The Bridge crackles with intelligence and great acting at every turn.
  3. The combination of solid plotting, decent dialogue, breathless editing and solid performances makes the series work.
  4. The show's humor is subtle, the plot lines somewhat predictable, but both the individual character development and the interaction among those characters make Sweden more than welcome.
  5. Laurie is excellent and quickly establishes Dr. Eldon Chance as a distinctly separate character from Dr. Gregory House. He is also damaged, but in his own somewhat mysterious way. Chaos proves compelling, at least for viewers.
  6. Unexpectedly, it's funny. And it gets funnier and sharper in future episodes.
  7. What's partly holding "CSI: Miami" back from being great is that, as in the original "CSI," the whole premise is too pat.
  8. The plot is a little overstuffed, but the special effects, crisp direction and high-octane performances keep us interested enough to follow Alice down the rabbit hole.
  9. Welcome to the Family may have the most potential of the new Thursday comedies, for the simple reason that it depends largely on careful character development as the grounding for its humor.
  10. It stars Elizabeth Reaser ("Grey's Anatomy"), as Bella, who strikes the right balance of snide, seasoned relationship survivor and romantic hopeful. There's a winning cast, particularly Rachel Boston who plays Bella's sister and Amir Talai ("Campus Ladies") as one of Bella's male buddies.
  11. To its credit, there are a few extra twists along the way that make the show more intriguing and which hint at a slightly darker feel (but not too bleak) and a chance to have a more complicated story than simply one family with super powers.
  12. Key and Peele are sufficiently talented and versatile to carry off a half-hour show on their own.
  13. It has a goofy charm and outsize ridiculousness that wins you over -- even if you'd prefer more snark.
  14. The film is cleverly structured as a time-travel flashback, beginning in 1966, at the end of Hartnell's tenancy of the lead role.
  15. The series is graced by extraordinary performances, especially from Elba, Ceesay, Pinto and Kinnear. The concept of the series, as well as the dialogue, forms a solid foundation for the kind of great character development we expect from a Ridley product. There are few improbable moments in the first two episodes when you feel Ridley trying just a little too hard to make his points--almost, but not quite, at the expense of character credibility.
  16. The performances are spot-on, of course, but Enos and Kinnaman were never the show's problem. Quite the opposite, in fact. Retooling the show with the murders solved at the end makes The Killing deserving of a new lease on TV life.
  17. The Netflix episodes aren’t quite as cheeky as the notorious British episode in which the prime minister is forced to copulate with a pig on live TV, but overall, the third season honors the sensibilities of the British originals.
  18. A cool video-meets-soap concept that looks as fresh as anything in years. ... [But] the dialogue falters and the acting is, in spots, forced.
  19. "The West Wing" needs changes, and it needs them now. Without a revamping of the show in some significant fashion, it runs the risk of losing its importance, dropping its political cachet and looking for all the world like a fine, if not sterling, bit of Hollywood fictional fluffery.
  20. Tacky, vulgar, politically incorrect and mocks others. And those are its good points.
  21. The dialogue is sharply creative, and the jokes are fresh and funny, even if the characters border on the insufferable.
  22. "Help Me Help You" has a few more surprises and comedic heft to it than expected.
  23. Setting up the first big heist takes all of the first episode, so our introduction to Smith and crew is too quick, more than a little forced and ultimately not compelling enough.
  24. Discerning viewers -- and anyone who's hooked on "Lost" -- will realize that "Jericho" is doling out hints to a very large mystery at a very slow pace, which is never a good combination.
  25. The first two hours are decent.
  26. O'Brien's debut was pretty much what one would expect from these kind of pre-hyped events. It was both funny and forced and the expectations of - what, exactly?--never seemed to materialize, even though Will Ferrell as the sole guest tried to drum something up and Pearl Jam, as the musical guest, at least kick-started an aural ruckus.
  27. Needs improvement, but it’ll make it. The goal should be to fit the show to Meyers’ obvious strengths, not try to fit Meyers to the show’s template.
  28. Bunheads will take some work and it could just as easily become either annoying or likable.
  29. This is all fairly predictable stuff and makes for a show that you'd watch because of the cast but would never put in the top tier of TV shows or talk about the next day at the office.
  30. In the long run, our interest in the show will directly correspond to our interest in whatever celebrity is featured from week to week.

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