San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 992 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Suburgatory: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Moonlight: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 526
  2. Negative: 0 out of 526
526 tv reviews
  1. The sitcom, premiering Thursday night, is perfectly adequate, but only that, and it doesn't compare well to the show Cummings co-created, "2 Broke Girls," which premiered Monday on CBS.
  2. The series is kind of a mess, but one you can't really look away from.
  3. This is a series that throws so much lunacy into the plotlines that even the writers on "Dynasty" must be hissing.
  4. The trouble with Welcome to the Captain, outside of the title and romantic emphasis, is that two episodes haven't revealed any clear direction.
  5. The performances really are good, almost good enough to make the hokey dialogue believable, but not quite good enough to make Low Winter Sun a must-see when there are so many other shows--about cops and otherwise--that do this moral ambiguity thing much better.
  6. The writing is loaded with cheap sentimentality, and dripping with saline poignancy, as you might expect. The likability of the young cast members almost counterbalances the schmaltz.
  7. It seems the writers got the initial idea in their heads -- Kyra Sedgwick raises hell -- then faltered in stacking the bricks around her. The accent is distracting, though the writers must have chosen Atlanta for a reason. The sweet tooth is gimmicky. And the fact she doesn't exactly close the trunk with force in the pilot is of some concern.
  8. At some point, your head will explode.
  9. There are funny moments here, mostly coming from Mohr's agitated rantings. But the laugh track is mighty intrusive, which detracts from the average jokes by throwing them in your face (or down your ear, as it were).
  10. Regardless of the memories and anecdotes, what these films lack are commentators who can provide cultural context.
  11. When the balance is off, as it is too frequently in Harry's Law, it undermines credibility. Bates is almost capable of making us overlook some of the show's problems.
  12. Rainn Wilson can carry a series, just not this one, as written. That doesn’t mean it’s a complete mess, but there are significant credibility problems on several levels that need to be addressed to build effectively on Wilson’s likability.
  13. "The Dresden Files" is currently mediocre, a series searching for the right tone, seemingly unsure of itself and all the while not quite selling itself to the non sci-fi crowd.
  14. Pieces of the familiar Arthurian epic are preserved in the script, but that doesn't mean the characters fit our images of them.
  15. It's painfully derivative on so many fronts that it sometimes seems you're watching five reality shows at once.
  16. It's hard to think of anyone likable among the main characters, except for Jeremy. And that's the sly point of the show.
  17. In truth, it's the bountiful hamminess of McShane and the other evildoers that makes Pillars great fun, even if it's never going to be a candidate for "Masterpiece Theatre."
  18. The comedy--anything but edgy--is one cee-ment pond and half a fancy eatin' table away from "The Beverly Hillbillies," and is rooted in the inevitable culture clash of a Tennessee family adjusting to life in Southern California.
  19. Ironside might be a better show if it didn't follow the "rules" of standard police procedurals quite so faithfully.
  20. Although the script isn't quite as memorable as Tarantino's film script, it is faithful to the events of the film as well as the signature mix of over-the-top violence, cartoonish dialogue and just a hint, so far, of the vampires who will form a welcoming party when the brothers get across the border to Mexico.
  21. The performances are over the top and enjoyable enough.
  22. The show was created by Courtney Kemp Agboh and has so much going for it--on the surface, anyway--that it's almost criminal that a powerful, attractive cast and high-end production values are hobbled by such a stupefying absence of originality.
  23. The pilot is not especially funny. But it has potential.
  24. The show itself is slight, the conceit perhaps worthy of an extended sketch, but after two episodes, it begins to feel stretched.
  25. It's light but predictable fun.
  26. Even in the first episode, it's clear that "Desperate Housewives" is a vastly improved series from a year ago. The passing is better; the tone is more focused. It's funnier and more focused. But it's also still "Desperate Housewives," and there's that malodorous whiff of the whole thing being past its sell-by date. [22 Sep 2006]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  27. Actually, "Emily's Reasons Why Not" does have its funny moments. The problem is twofold. The show tweaks and contorts itself so hard to get those laughs that the whole thing feels forced and unmanageable for two consecutive episodes, much less a season. And secondly, the premise is unlikely to hold up for any length of time.
  28. The Whole Truth, which airs opposite "The Defenders" on ABC, is less lousy.
  29. Sometimes the suburban jokes work -- every little girl seems to be named Caitlin -- but Hidden Hills is mostly still foraging for the hidden jokes that will make it more original.
  30. It's a rote cop show, but in the last five minutes or so, it hints at something deeper.

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