San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 1,192 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Pushing Daisies: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Til Death: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 649
  2. Negative: 0 out of 649
649 tv reviews
  1. David Simon’s extraordinary miniseries does live up to the complete meaning of Fitzgerald’s observation. It is ultimately a tragic story, with an enormously moving emotional payoff at the end. The finale will move you, perhaps to tears.
  2. There are many small and wonderful dramatic accomplishments in the underappreciated gem that is Battlestar Galactica, but perhaps the most enduring is that what was conceived of as an epic space adventure has turned into a finely detailed, intimate drama.
  3. State of Play is one of those series where a moment's brilliance is rivaled by the very next scene, a careening thriller that gives credence to the idea that there may not be any better format for telling an impact story than over the course of four or six hours. [16 Apr 2004, p.E1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  4. What makes Aisling Walsh’s film must-watch, however, is Tom Hollander’s performance as the great Welsh poet.
  5. This series is one of a kind.
  6. What remains compelling about The Shield as it heads into its last hurrah are the gray areas and ethical gradations of the characters that have defined it.
  7. They [Rayna and Juliette], and the other characters, are anything but [one-dimensional cliches], thanks not only to the writing but also to the performances of the colorful and capable cast.
  8. Courage or crazy, or maybe both, everyone involved is following the same directive: to blow up the traditional sitcom. It’s just crazy funny.
  9. Rescue Me may ask a lot of its viewers, but it's always a leap worth taking, and well rewarded. [13 June 2007, p.E1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  10. The animation, overseen by art director James McDermott, is fresh, colorful and as wacky as the script.
  11. The performances are superb at every level, with each actor rising to the challenge of revealing previously unrealized aspects of his or her character. Fortunately, the cast is blessed with a beautifully nuanced script from the Williams brothers.
  12. The emotional authenticity of Downton Abbey continues to make it a classic.
  13. It is emotionally raw, harrowing, and a thing of such singular horrific beauty, it will move you, exhaust you and, almost paradoxically, thrill you at the heights television drama can attain.
  14. As much as the script, Reiner’s direction makes both stories seem oxymoronically unique and distinct at the same time. The performances are extraordinary, as they must be to complete the process of retelling a seemingly similar story.
  15. The writing, by Weiner, direction by Scott Hornbacher and performances are, of course, top notch.
  16. It's a strong cast, and Byrne and Wiest continue to deliver incredibly mannered and minutely shaded performances.
  17. Iit’s one of the best-written shows on TV.... This is a solid ensemble cast, with equally fine, and often very funny, performances from Ash, Arnold, Lee, Epps and Bauer. Any way you look at it, Survivor’s Remorse offers the complete package.
  18. Lapine's direction is almost the star of Six by Sondheim. Not only has he used the six songs to illuminate the composer's life, he organizes years and years of interviews as if they are an ongoing conversation--which, in many ways, they are. They are the monograph of the life and art of a singular man, perfectly assembled, bit by bit, piece by piece.
  19. While these character traits represent the real heart of the story, there are times you feel that Ridley is making an instructional film for a corporate HR department. On paper, it’s good for him to break away from stereotyping, but he does it with such obviousness, he almost undermines the power of his story and of the show’s extraordinary performances.
  20. As credible as the film is, what isn’t always clear is why we should care if people want to believe in the Hubbard gospel, or give the church wads of cash each time they want to reach a new clarity level.
  21. If the relatively simple parallel of the man and his role were all there was to The Dresser, it would be mildly interesting. But what makes it far more than that are the shades of longing, resentment, spite and indifference displayed by members of Sir’s circle.
  22. The first three episodes of Season 2 that AMC sent out continue that level of achievement with no evident missteps.
  23. The entire constellation of impetuous, ambitious, determined and insecure young urbanites in Girls is realigning in the new season, but at no point in the four episodes sent to critics for review do you feel that any of it is artificial.
  24. Although the story moves slowly and much of the content consists of recorded phone calls, we want to know if Steven Avery was set up, if Brendan Dassey was involved in Teresa Halbach’s murder. We may think we know the answers, but by the end of the fourth episode, we’ve also witnessed enough out of nowhere surprises to accept that real life doesn’t follow a script.
  25. With grit, guts and some of the best performances you’ll see on TV this year, American Crime aims for truth and pulls no punches getting there.
  26. Sons of Anarchy remains as bare-knuckled and, almost inconceivably, as funny and crass as ever. And it doesn't take Season 3 very long to ratchet up the twists
  27. In the case of Sunny, it comes out of the gate as brilliantly twisted as ever.
  28. It means there's finally something good (and funny) on Tuesday nights.
  29. The film is loaded with useful and accurately scary information about what sleep deprivation is doing to us. It’s an eye-opener, but if you pay attention, it may not keep you up at night.
  30. Maggio employs the now-standard historical documentary technique employed most visibly by Ken Burns, but the real strength of his film rests in the care with which he builds his case about the epic struggles Italian Americans have had over the years, and their invaluable contributions to a culture that took a long time to accept them.

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