San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 1,067 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Orange is the New Black: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Women's Murder Club: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 571
  2. Negative: 0 out of 571
571 tv reviews
  1. The film is cleverly structured as a time-travel flashback, beginning in 1966, at the end of Hartnell's tenancy of the lead role.
  2. Virtually every performance is equal to the quality of the script, but Moura is especially compelling as he manipulates the seeming incongruities of Escobar’s character to heighten his aura of unpredictable menace.... Brancato does make one significant misstep by having the entire series heavily narrated by Murphy.
  3. [The balance between love and sex in the gay world] is a valuable and promising theme, more than worthy as a foundation for a show about contemporary gay life, but it needs to be explored through better writing and deeper character development, and without the predictable cliches that rattle like Muni’s F line through the six episodes of Looking that were sent to critics.
  4. All your favorites are back in force, with a few twists, but the allure of the series always has been and always will be Hall, who manages to make a killer (who kills only people who deserve it, mostly) likable, believable, engaging and funny, as he works his job as a blood splatter expert at Miami Metro Homicide.
  5. It's slightly unpolished in some areas but funny and charming and a perfect companion series to "Chris."
  6. In the end, it's easy to overlook some of the credibility gaps because the writing is otherwise so fine, as are the direction and the performances.
  7. An argument could be made that so much attention to the history-making World Series runs of both of their favorite teams - which happened after the original documentary aired - is excessive, particularly with the Yankees. But that's a minor quibble in an otherwise superb, informative account.
  8. It was a very funny show, and while there are expected similarities with “The Daily Show,” Oliver’s personality sets the HBO show apart.
  9. Manhunt may not have the thrills and chills of a Hollywood feature film about the raid on bin Laden's compound, but you'll come away from a viewing of the film knowing that there is much more to covert operations than midnight raids and state-of-the-art electronic surveillance.
  10. Whitechapel may not reinvent the police procedural, but it's great fun, and the third episode is a heart-stopping race against time.
  11. There’s an unabashed quaintness about Normal Street, reminiscent of a time when kids TV was all about fun and homemade adventure.
  12. This is not sophisticated, drawing-room humor. It's closest to what they used to call college humor, and what is now considered stoned humor. But beneath the silliness is gentle but still dead-on satire that makes The Birthday Boys worth a look and a laugh.
  13. The writing is hilariously great, as are the performances. But, mostly, it all works because Billy and Julie are so clueless. If they felt an ounce of shame or regret, the comedy wouldn’t work.
  14. Some may criticize Jarecki’s rigidly amoral documentary style, but even if he and co-producer Smerling don’t skew their filmmaking to underscore the guilt of their subjects, the facts, as they say, speak for themselves. When the facts are as extraordinary as they are in The Jinx, it’s impossible not to listen.
  15. The workaday mysteries of Jackie and the phenomenal performance of Falco are more than enough to hold down the series while the rest of the characters find their niche.
  16. The joy of this series really comes down to two things: lots of action and some babelicious butt-kicking. Not something to be proud of for enjoying it, but true. Pass the chips and ale -- and down in front!
  17. Overall, the emotional honesty of Kieran's character and his all too human craving for acceptance and happiness make In the Flesh oddly moving.
  18. The performance quality of the show is matched only by the sharpness of the writing.
  19. It has some winning moments, and clearly the cast members are having fun with their roles. In the end, though, it just doesn't connect the way it really should have.
  20. The show succeeds by spreading out the story lines. By the second episode, everyone is surprisingly well developed.
  21. The Chicago Code may stick to police-procedural formula, but it does have most of the elements needed to make the show at least a moderate success. With better writing and a bit more imagination, it could do even better.
  22. "Ugly Betty" is worth checking out. It retains a charm that far outstrips expectations. And Ferrera's performances are small wonders to behold.
  23. Raising Hope works on two levels, the absurdist gags about dysfunctional families and lower-class values that populated "Earl," and the never-too-saccharine sweetness that Jimmy brings to the world. If Garcia can keep up this mix, Fox may have itself a non-animated comedy hit.
  24. Although the characters have only scant or fleeting redeeming personal values, we continue to buy into their machinations because of how they are created and because of superbly convincing performances at every level of the cast.
  25. It's Close who makes "Damages" a series to contend with.
  26. Logue and Raymond-James are, straight out of the gate, the two most believable and funny buddies you'll see on the screen.
  27. There's nothing inherently wrong with The Good Wife other than it's a legal series with too many close-up shots of knowing glances and "attagirl Alicia" moments of empowerment that you saw coming 20 minutes prior.
  28. If the first half of the film seems slightly more engaging than the second, it’s because it has more music. Queen Latifah should be a slam dunk for an Emmy nomination for playing Bessie, but she deserves even more praise for helping contemporary audiences understand the power of Bessie’s blues.
  29. The first episode focuses far too much on these stereotypes. On top of that, it’s not even funny. But what a difference a second episode makes.... The real difference between the first and second episodes, though, is not just that the stereotypes are eventually turned upside down but that the characters are no longer just those stereotypes.
  30. A show that does what it's supposed to do -- keep you riveted and entertained. [25 Sep 2002]
    • San Francisco Chronicle

Top Trailers