San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 1,340 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Handmaid's Tale: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Beauty and the Beast (2012): Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 735
  2. Negative: 0 out of 735
735 tv reviews
  1. Hurricane is a whirling impressionistic painting of the band, beautifully conveying the energy, drive and genius of the Stones, more or less chronologically within the basic flashback structure.
  2. There is much more to the story than the graphic details of the invasion and whether the police could have intervened earlier. The case became a pivotal issue in the debate over the death penalty in Connecticut and that's a big part of the film.
  3. The filmmakers do a very good job keeping all the separate plates spinning for six hours, although, to be honest, the show virtually cries out for a sequel focusing more thoroughly on modern times.
  4. The film is cleverly structured as a time-travel flashback, beginning in 1966, at the end of Hartnell's tenancy of the lead role.
  5. So much happens in Flowers that it’s hard to believe it comprises only six half-hour episodes. More to the point, though, is that the show is so completely hilarious for a very long time. Sharpe’s writing is on point at every moment, with a wondrous attention to detail.
  6. [The balance between love and sex in the gay world] is a valuable and promising theme, more than worthy as a foundation for a show about contemporary gay life, but it needs to be explored through better writing and deeper character development, and without the predictable cliches that rattle like Muni’s F line through the six episodes of Looking that were sent to critics.
  7. All your favorites are back in force, with a few twists, but the allure of the series always has been and always will be Hall, who manages to make a killer (who kills only people who deserve it, mostly) likable, believable, engaging and funny, as he works his job as a blood splatter expert at Miami Metro Homicide.
  8. The show’s first episode sets the scene, but only hints at the richness of detail that informs future episodes. It’s not just that we learn things about the various characters we probably didn’t suspect at the outset: The genius of the series is how Spotnitz and his creative team carefully advance the thought-provoking thematic elements through stunning attention to detail.
  9. It's slightly unpolished in some areas but funny and charming and a perfect companion series to "Chris."
  10. No summary description begins to capture the inspired silliness of “With Bob and David.” But one thing is certain: Television is way funnier “With Bob and David” than without them.
  11. The performances are nicely detailed and fully credible, contributing to the level of credibility necessary to keep the conceit of the show from seeming gimmicky.
  12. For the record, both Minnette and Langford are so good, you almost forget they are too old to be playing high school sophomores. While the script may be overly contrived at times, it at least aims to make its points about teen suicide through drama and only occasionally resorting to speechifying.
  13. In the end, it's easy to overlook some of the credibility gaps because the writing is otherwise so fine, as are the direction and the performances.
  14. An argument could be made that so much attention to the history-making World Series runs of both of their favorite teams - which happened after the original documentary aired - is excessive, particularly with the Yankees. But that's a minor quibble in an otherwise superb, informative account.
  15. It was a very funny show, and while there are expected similarities with “The Daily Show,” Oliver’s personality sets the HBO show apart.
  16. Manhunt may not have the thrills and chills of a Hollywood feature film about the raid on bin Laden's compound, but you'll come away from a viewing of the film knowing that there is much more to covert operations than midnight raids and state-of-the-art electronic surveillance.
  17. In the end, it works only as well as the performance of its star. Needless to say, when the performance is delivered by Audra McDonald, it works brilliantly.
  18. Whitechapel may not reinvent the police procedural, but it's great fun, and the third episode is a heart-stopping race against time.
  19. There’s an unabashed quaintness about Normal Street, reminiscent of a time when kids TV was all about fun and homemade adventure.
  20. The general conceit for the series isn’t the problem--it’s the ham-fisted execution. Bowker doesn’t trust his viewers to allow credible drama and character development to make his points, so he hits us over the head, repeatedly.
  21. The first eight episodes of the sixth and final season, although not flawless, remind us of why we care about the show.
  22. This is not sophisticated, drawing-room humor. It's closest to what they used to call college humor, and what is now considered stoned humor. But beneath the silliness is gentle but still dead-on satire that makes The Birthday Boys worth a look and a laugh.
  23. The writing is hilariously great, as are the performances. But, mostly, it all works because Billy and Julie are so clueless. If they felt an ounce of shame or regret, the comedy wouldn’t work.
  24. Some may criticize Jarecki’s rigidly amoral documentary style, but even if he and co-producer Smerling don’t skew their filmmaking to underscore the guilt of their subjects, the facts, as they say, speak for themselves. When the facts are as extraordinary as they are in The Jinx, it’s impossible not to listen.
  25. As good as the cast is, the music is even better, with many of the group’s most memorable hits, such as “Mr. Telephone Man,” “Candy Girl” and, most of all, “Can You Stand the Rain” are celebrated in exquisitely choreographed and costumed performances.
  26. The workaday mysteries of Jackie and the phenomenal performance of Falco are more than enough to hold down the series while the rest of the characters find their niche.
  27. The joy of this series really comes down to two things: lots of action and some babelicious butt-kicking. Not something to be proud of for enjoying it, but true. Pass the chips and ale -- and down in front!
  28. Overall, the emotional honesty of Kieran's character and his all too human craving for acceptance and happiness make In the Flesh oddly moving.
  29. The performance quality of the show is matched only by the sharpness of the writing.
  30. Rutman’s writing, his exquisite sense of character, the subtle shadings behind even the most sexual or violent events combine for much of the way to make Indian Summers so exceptional.

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