San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 1,143 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Arrested Development: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 The Vampire Diaries: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 616
  2. Negative: 0 out of 616
616 tv reviews
  1. Louie is the gold standard of contemporary TV comedy.
  2. Rutman’s writing, his exquisite sense of character, the subtle shadings behind even the most sexual or violent events combine for much of the way to make Indian Summers so exceptional.
  3. The new season is not only as smart and absurdly funny as ever, but also reflects the rapid changes in how we watch television.
  4. With elements of "Wonder Years," "Cosby" and the "The Jeffersons," but also a spirit all its own, "Chris" is a sitcom that finally makes the family funny again.
  5. In the case of Sunny, it comes out of the gate as brilliantly twisted as ever.
  6. Every performance is terrific.... While these characters are written and performed as over the top, the show also celebrates the subtle underplaying that goes into making Big Head and Gilfoyle so memorable. That variety of tone is another way in which Silicon Valley sets itself apart from most other half-hour comedies.
  7. The entire constellation of impetuous, ambitious, determined and insecure young urbanites in Girls is realigning in the new season, but at no point in the four episodes sent to critics for review do you feel that any of it is artificial.
  8. Self-delusion can grow fairly tiresome, in life and on TV, but what makes Amy sympathetic is that even though she almost convinces us at times that her personal fairy tale actually makes sense, we are always aware of her basic decency and, more important, her vulnerability.
  9. The writing, by Weiner, direction by Scott Hornbacher and performances are, of course, top notch.
  10. It is gripping, well acted and beautifully written. Most of all, its multiple layers of mystery should keep viewers coming back for more, week after week.
  11. Lost is a different genre, one that may infuriate even the loyalists, but there's something impressive and rewarding in its density.
  12. In the Flesh is of course a complex and thought-provoking allegory.
  13. It's great to see Steinberg performing again at the La Jolla Playhouse as a kind of framing device for Barry Avrich's skillfully directed documentary.
  14. A genuinely funny and immediately likable sitcom.
  15. America in Prime Time is a thoughtful and thought-provoking keeper.
  16. Angie Tribeca hits on every cylinder--sharp writing, consistent attention to detail (the visual jokes are just as funny as the spoken ones), terrific performances by Jones, MacArthur and Burns, as well as the secondary cast and guest stars, and great direction, including Steve Carell for the pilot episode.
  17. The dialogue in the first two episodes of the new season crackles with brilliance.
  18. Every performance is a winner, from Marsan’s mousey Norrell, to Carvel’s brash Jonathan, to Englert’s increasingly mad and self-destructive Lady Pole.
  19. Graham Yost, who wrote HBO's "Band of Brothers," creates deeply drawn characters who are revealed slowly over the course of an episode (and season). He's the kind of writer whose vision and touch you can trust over the long haul.
  20. Mann's stamp is all over this. Robbery Homicide Division has a distinct "film" look and a more languid pace than other TV dramas.
  21. There is a brilliant mix of poignancy and hilarity in Getting On, which is why it all works so well.
  22. Laden with laugh-out-loud moments. ... Just as "Curb Your Enthusiasm" so boldly and brilliantly attacks taboo subjects, so does "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia," though the humor is spread from one clueless, self-centered ass to four, clueless, self-centered slackers. [4 Aug 2005]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  23. The writing is hilariously great, as are the performances. But, mostly, it all works because Billy and Julie are so clueless. If they felt an ounce of shame or regret, the comedy wouldn’t work.
  24. "Weeds" is colossally great... a series far better than its premise and utterly essential for devotees of smart, entertaining television.
  25. State of Play is one of those series where a moment's brilliance is rivaled by the very next scene, a careening thriller that gives credence to the idea that there may not be any better format for telling an impact story than over the course of four or six hours. [16 Apr 2004, p.E1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  26. The first two episodes of the second Silicon Valley season are more than satisfying.
  27. The series is so good that it isn't seriously harmed by its few minor flaws. Much of the dialogue is brilliantly written, revelatory and credible.
  28. The Emmy-winning show is still as funny as ever, if not moreso, but it also merits our attention for the care with which it is managing a long run on television.
  29. Big, noisy and crazy brilliant HBO series.... The performances are masterful on every level, beginning with Cannavale’s Richie Finestra, who is only occasionally capable of keeping his inner turmoil of rage, ambition and fear of failure from exploding to the surface. With his performance, Cannavale vaults to the top of the list of Emmy candidates.
  30. The Pacific is a superb, viscerally moving and harrowing depiction of World War II and a worthy complement to "Band of Brothers" (2001).

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