San Francisco Examiner's Scores

  • Movies
For 782 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 A Moment of Innocence
Lowest review score: 0 Lost Souls
Score distribution:
782 movie reviews
  1. While the premise is intriguing, the movie is gluey, bumbling and singularly un-thrilling.
  2. That Berkley cannot act is indisputable. But her dancing looks like a seizure.
  3. The one outstanding ingredient in this exercise is Miller, an English actor who is not only irresistibly adorable and a good actor, but also speaks in a perfect American accent.
  4. Unfortunately, the movie never really goes anywhere. It's all pleasant enough to watch, but you never feel that Danny and Arthur's craziness (eventually Danny is committed), Sid's stoicism, Selma's selflessness and Steven's despair coalesce to mean anything significant or illuminating.
  5. Lee seems to think that all his major characters are basically good people who deserve another chance, and so for the sake of an inappropriate happy ending, everyone important gets one.
  6. During this movie, every few moments the theater fills with the appreciative guffaws of 18-year-old young men. How old are you?
  7. This movie has everything but Humphrey Bogart, and I'm sure he's sorry he was unavailable.
  8. It's all quite inspiring, but despite the fact that this is based on someone's actual experiences, the whole thing has an unfortunate Hollywood ring to it.
  9. A film that can be enjoyed by all ages and that insults no one's intelligence.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Watching movies like this strain to fit new technologies like VR into old genres and plot conventions, you can't help wondering whether the real artificial intelligence experiment these days isn't Hollywood itself. Plug the psychological profiles of 200 hit movies into its hive-mind, and out comes one plastic-bodied, loop-brained clone after another.
  10. Sublimely ridiculous.
  11. The direction by Roger Donaldson is facile and understated, as is, for the most part, the script by Dennis Feldman. Even the actors pitch in to play down the silliness of it all.
  12. With no frills and no commentary, Howard and company have made the kind of absorbing thriller we have in mind when we wistfully sigh, "They don't make movies like they used to."
  13. With an original score by Alan Menken and Gilbert and Sullivan-ish songs by Menken and lyricist Stephen Schwartz, the movie is the cartoon equivalent of a full-scale, high-quality Broadway musical.
  14. Except for the casting, it would be difficult to find any substantial difference between this movie and the previous ones, or this movie and any number of high-tech adventure movies of the last decade.
  15. Troisi, who was a star in Italy, hasn't been seen widely in the United States, and from this film it is difficult to be certain how he achieved his fame.
  16. The delight of the movie is Keitel, who finally gets to play someone who doesn't look like he's about to mug you.
  17. In stupidity, this movie ranks up there among the greats.
  18. When Party Girl isn't being silly, it tries to be endearing and socially redeeming, and to a good degree succeeds.
  19. Director Eastwood favors naturalism and sometimes the effort to reproduce what it is like to meet someone new bogs the picture down irreparably.
  20. Although most of the stars of this movie are real, live actors, Casper is mostly just a big cartoon in which those live actors must interact with some devilishly clever spectral animation.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A Little Princess is a delightful film. Bring your children, or just bring yourself.
  21. Director John McTiernan outdoes the previous "Die Hards" (McTiernan directed the first, Renny Harlin the second) with machinery, stunts, noise, bullets and guts. Hand-held camerawork tweaks the audience's sense of anxiety further, and for the most part it works well.
  22. The particulars of the plot don't make a great deal of sense, but Hartley's films have much more to do with style, or rather a philosophical refusal to show emotional involvement.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's too slick to be truly disturbing, but it's that slickness that keeps you on the edge of your chair.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Superbly acted by its young cast, written and directed with great sophistication, Wild Reeds moves with a sad assurance through that domain that most American filmmakers explore only clumsily: the mysteries of the human heart.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    French Kiss has only a tenuous hold on reality; it is far more fully steeped in the conventions of latter-day movie romance than in the messy actualities of real-life mating.
  23. A documentary with a keen eye, a playful sense of timing and an inquisitive soul.
  24. In general, the script is just slightly above sitcom level, but a few lines, owing to great delivery by terrific actors, raise this a few notches on the comedy scale.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Imagine if "On the Road" ended with Sal and Dean settling down in the 'burbs. Or if the carnal encounters in Henry Miller's "Sexus" were prefaced with admonitions to the reader not to "objectify" women. The Basketball Diaries is a similar travesty: It turns a celebration of outlaw life into a just-say-no cautionary tale that Nancy Reagan would love.

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