San Francisco Examiner's Scores

  • Movies
For 764 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Toy Story
Lowest review score: 0 Men Cry Bullets
Score distribution:
764 movie reviews
  1. William H. Macy is fine as the detective Arbogast, wearing a hat he could have borrowed from Martin Balsam in the original role.
  2. A smart, funny and endearing movie. It has enough cynicism to satisfy the part of DiCillo that would mock a blue-eyed superstar, yet enough genuine sentiment to make it possible for us to swallow the cynicism.
  3. The disappointing ending aside, there is much to enjoy in The Game, a creation with a sheen so highly burnished that sometimes you feel you must look away.
  4. The veteran Baker anchors the proceedings, and you would like to see more of her character.
  5. The good guys metamorphose into bad guys and back into good guys with dazzling efficiency in Brian Helgeland's disturbing, comic script.
  6. Gattaca is a welcome throwback to the days of good, low-tech sci-fi, stressing character and atmosphere over computer-generated effects and juvenile thrills.
  7. Coppola again shines his intelligence on this bestseller material, rather than just shoving it through the Hollywood mill unsifted.
  8. A charming and moving film about a slightly racy subculture in a highly rule-bound society.
  9. Perhaps a bit miscast, and with a penchant for too many double-takes, Perry nonetheless is game.
  10. Private Parts is a sparkling, nonstop entertainment written by Len Blum and Michael Kalesniko and directed by Betty Thomas, but sometimes it gives the impression that Stern is nothing short of Nobel Peace Prize material.
  11. It's a testament to what happens when all the right ingredients come together. Wag the Dog is the best political satire in years.
  12. What's best about this script is the premise: a lawyer who doesn't lie.
  13. The sort of smutty scandalmongering the average moviegoer can really get behind.
    • San Francisco Examiner
  14. This overall good feeling helps smooth over the sometimes shocking lapses in logic.
  15. It succeeds because of the frenzied, kinetic direction by Mike Newell, one of the most interesting big-hit directors.
  16. The finest element in de la Pena's carefully assembled account is how she doesn't simply state the obvious, but lets the meaty facts speak for themselves.
    • San Francisco Examiner
  17. Slightly more mature and better assembled, Road Trip goes one better on "American Pie" by teasing out the idiosyncrasies in four guys existing in a personality grab bag.
  18. Comes on like an "After School Special'' psychodrama that's been taken off its medication.
    • San Francisco Examiner
  19. Hamlet finds in Hawke's greatish performance a Great Dane for this, or any other, modern moment.
  20. Sometimes the movie lacks a quietness, an omission most egregiously felt at the end.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    After more than an hour of fun, the film turns dark as Solanas' mental state worsens. Not only does the brilliant kook wear out her welcome with Warhol, but the portrayal also grates on the viewer.
  21. Softley and Amini say they consciously viewed Kate as a film noir kind of heroine, a beauty leading a good man astray. And that, added to the setting of the second half of the movie in canal-riven Venice, gives the story the kind of moral haziness that verges on Thomas Mann territory.
  22. The standard noir trappings are here: the femme fatale, double-crossing, fatalism, broken dreams, innocence betrayed and the rest of it. But Stone pushes it all so far and so relentlessly that it becomes absurdist comedy.
  23. Quiet, moving and beautifully shot.
  24. Bay has two great assets in Connery and Cage. The special effects give The Rock a James Bondian feel so Connery's wry, world-weary devil-may-careishness looks right at home here.
  25. To enumerate exactly how Bean messes up would be to expose the silliness of this movie, and since Bean's humor is terribly silly, rather, wonderfully silly, there isn't much point in going into detail.
  26. You find yourself absorbed in simply looking at them to the extent that it's hard to hear what they're saying. It's a nice dilemma for a movie to present.
  27. It is familiarly old-fashioned, complete with montages of newspaper clippings fluttering past and calendar days slipping by. The sets, costumes, old cars and general atmosphere all beautifully recall moviemaking of a bygone era. And for that, hats off to Duke.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's a beautiful movie. Too beautiful for its own good, really.
  28. But then, just when it appears the race is lost, Steve James' love for his character and art form kicks in and wins the day, and, though flawed, Prefontaine is an engrossing portrait of a complex figure.

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