San Jose Mercury News/Contra Costa Times' Scores

  • TV
For 422 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 69% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Tick: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 In Case of Emergency: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 319
  2. Negative: 0 out of 319
319 tv reviews
  1. Whatever the case, it's a blast to watch Valley's character squirm his way out of a major mess, while keeping his droll sense of humor intact. Human Target never will be a big-time Emmy magnet, but as a piece of good, escapist fun, it definitely hits the mark.
  2. A pretty lively and entertaining show, maybe the fledgling WB network's first real shot at a breakaway hit. [10 Mar 1997, p.10E]
    • San Jose Mercury News/Contra Costa Times
  3. Has a solid premise and a lavish look. The show's signature visual gimmick features characters morphing into their younger selves. Then there's the appealing Rush, who makes a very strong first impression. [27 Sept 2003, p.D01]
    • San Jose Mercury News/Contra Costa Times
  4. Rogue does a nice job of methodically building an unsettling mood.
  5. So far so good. ... A show that exudes a distinctive vibe and carries some social relevance.
  6. The story, penned by executive producer Andy Breckman ("Rat Race") gets predictable at times, but it deftly manages to mix drama and humor while bringing new twists to a shop-worn genre. [11 July 2002, p.D1]
    • San Jose Mercury News/Contra Costa Times
  7. [Dinosaur-rock] cliches still pack a comedic punch because, well, they're just so outlandish and evocative. The key is to bring some fresh twists to them, and for the most part, Leary's bunch succeeds in doing so.
  8. All of the lead actors dig deeply into their roles, with Farrell playing the wary, weary burnout to perfection, and Vaughn shifting into full-throttle intensity. The story is dark and atmospheric--just the way fans like it. Meanwhile, the first three episodes hint at enough buried secrets and fresh angles to indicate that the story still has a lot to give.
  9. It has enough kooky class warfare, sexual shenanigans and whodunit intrigue to make for some escapist summer fun.
  10. Viewers turned off by the bitterly boisterous, superficial and often one-sided confrontations on the cable news channels might find The Sunset Limited to be refreshing in some ways.
  11. The series takes its horror seriously. There are genuine jolts, along with lots of intense, turbocharged action sequences, and fountains of blood that give the story visceral oomph. The faint of heart may want to sit this one out. On the other hand, there's also enough comedic energy to keep things from feeling excruciatingly brutal.
  12. The trick for Midler's writers will be to make sure the show is at least somewhat grounded in real-life situations while keeping the inside-Hollywood stuff from being too inside. It's funny, for example, when she expresses vengeful bitterness over losing the 1979 Oscar to Sally Field ("Norma Rae"), but it might not be so funny to hear references to her 1982 celluloid stink bomb "Jinxed." (Remember that one?) [11 Oct 2000, p.D01]
    • San Jose Mercury News/Contra Costa Times
  13. What Up All Night has over other baby-rearing shows is a refreshing irreverence.
  14. "Thief" is a worthy addition to [FX's] schedule.
  15. The production is bolstered by some stunning visuals and a few tantalizing plot twists that I won't go into here. Also, the we-don't-need-Batman female empowerment angle holds some intrigue. [9 Oct 2002, p.A1]
    • San Jose Mercury News/Contra Costa Times
  16. From an advance look at the season opener, this season's cast is a particularly lively mix with a multimedia artist, a "Beach Blanket Babylon" costume designer, a model-turned-designer and an ex-biker among those competing.
  17. Sunday's explosive two-hour opener boldly delivers on the promise by TNT producers to rev up both the pace and the firepower in Season 2.
  18. What really makes the opening episode work, though, is the chemistry between Grammer--as Chuck Darling, an egotistical newsman who has returned to Pittsburgh after his career stalled--and Heaton as his uptight longtime co-anchor, Kelly Carr, who isn't thrilled by his return.
  19. Ringer may not be able to match the Master of Suspense at the top of his game, but it does a great job of creating a constant state of queasy tension.
  20. Despite all the implausibilities and irritations, Switched manages to make a positive impression, thanks to some sturdy writing and solid performances that adequately sell the premise.
  21. Brody's portrayal of the wise but nerdy Seth energizes The O.C. He's comical without being cartoonish, and the humorous touches he brings to the story help to lighten up a show that at times feels overly heavy. Here's hoping the script writers don't leave his character in the dust in favor of chasing more glamorous story lines. [5 Aug 2003, p.D01]
    • San Jose Mercury News/Contra Costa Times
  22. The boys are at their best when mocking the absurdities of what they find on television.
  23. For now, though, Delany is enough to hold our attention. With a deft touch, she blends just enough warmth and vulnerability with the sass and smarts to make it all palatable.
  24. They [Robin Williams and James Wolk] seem to be having a blast playing off one another, and their comedic energy is infectious.
  25. The Michael J. Fox Show tries really hard to be as warm as a cup of cocoa yet hilariously irreverent. Maybe too hard.... On the plus side, Fox still oozes self-deprecating charm, and I love the sweet and playful chemistry he has with Brandt. Also, Pierce is a hoot as the smooth con man of a boss. More of that, please.
  26. House of Cards remains a slick and suspenseful--if not exactly layered and nuanced--saga that sucks you in from the start.
  27. The Slap, a provocative new NBC drama, is a saga that gets under your skin. That doesn't mean it's a great show, but I imagine the issues it raises will spark plenty of spirited dinner-table chatter among those who see it.
  28. Crossfire Hurricane deftly blends vintage concert footage, TV broadcasts, pieces of key songs and clips from other documentaries in with voiced-over highlights from 80 hours of fresh interviews with current and past band members--all conducted off-screen.
  29. Grace has a world of promise with thoughtful writing by Nancy Miller ("The Closer," "Any Day Now"), an intriguing take on the nature of faith and a sheer force-of-nature performance by Hunter.
  30. The show's characters have proven to be an engaging bunch over the long haul and several themes embedded in The Game pack more emotional punch than most sitcoms. Judging from fan response, this is clearly a game plan that works.

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