Seattle Post-Intelligencer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,749 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Before Sunset
Lowest review score: 0 Underclassman
Score distribution:
2,749 movie reviews
  1. An honorable and often enticing piece of personal filmmaking.
  2. Cedric Kahn has caught the irrational compulsion, nail-biting tension and unpredictability of plot that is Simenon at his best.
  3. The impressive marriage of CGI backgrounds and traditional hand-drawn characters gives Oshii more tools to sculpt his vision in color and light.
  4. In its final scenes, when truth and superstition collide, the film becomes more preposterous than anything Penn may have contrived earlier.
  5. It's bloody brilliant.
  6. Captures the lovely, heart-and-eye-opening ode to youthful possibility with affection and compassion.
  7. It's a partisan campaign film, of course, but a subtle one.
  8. What it lacks in melodramatic punch it makes up for in unexpected shadings in the characters, predator and victim alike.
  9. The supporting performers all shine, especially Irons in the thankless role of the clueless cuckold husband.
  10. Wise, entertaining and often very funny.
  11. Bale is totally convincing, if not especially endearing.
  12. Saw
    The filmmakers piece it together with almost clockwork perfection and deliver it with masterful misdirection, creating the most ingenious, eccentric and brazenly jaundiced psycho-thriller to come along in years.
  13. It's boldly acted, absorbing and satisfying as a history lesson and chock-full of extravagantly brutal battle sequences.
  14. Doyle's handheld camerawork is intimate and curious and his hazy colors radiate off the screen.
  15. It makes for one of the best and most haunting of the recent Asian horror films.
  16. The film is a melancholy but poetic meditation on the fragility of the gift of life.
  17. A smart, savvy and satisfying Hollywood comedy.
  18. It's both innocent and bizarre, with a mischievous sense of fantasy marked by simple but striking cinematic magic.
  19. It lets down in the last act and is probably too mired in serial-murderer-movie formulaics to garner Oscar attention. But it's his tightest, best film since "Unforgiven."
  20. The film below it is such an entertaining and poignantly bittersweet take-down of a good man's midlife crisis that the translation still works like a charm.
  21. Compassionate, potent documentary.
  22. Makes the translation with all its wit, incisive dialogue and eccentric characters intact, and then some.
  23. Fresh, vibrant and vital, this interpretation reminds us why Shakespeare is timeless.
  24. Blanchett is, warts-and-all, letter perfect.
  25. Danny Aiello is right at home as owner Louis, a paternal Italian father to all but his own son, reigning over the throng from his corner table like a benevolent lord and maybe underworld gangster.
  26. Machuca is a quiet film, moving sadly toward its inevitable climax, the final scenes a lesson in the methods by which the military restores order to a divided country.
  27. It's messy and unsettled, but Bellocchio's distaste for the cynicism and mendacity is potent and sincere.
  28. It's the warmest, most generous portrait of American hospitality you've seen from a European movie in some time.
  29. The ironies and contradictions that give the first half a dark humor give way to gravity and respect as soldiers are killed (off camera).
  30. Genuinely funny and sweet, the film's "everybody wins" philosophy resonates beyond the feel-good surfaces.

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