Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,502 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Pixel Revolt
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
2502 music reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, an excess of downtempo tracks mires Tell Me You Love Me's momentum in its second half, concluding with a pair of refreshing but nearly identical back-to-back acoustic-driven R&B songs that might as well be a medley.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's the first Van Morrison album in over a decade that doesn't just rest on his legacy, but actually expands it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wolf Parade captures how complacency allows simmering tensions to metastasize.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's as diverse as anything Ritter's done yet also focused in its exploration of joy, sorrow, and their strange intermingling. It's proof enough that Ritter is one of the true keepers of the American folk lineage--a proud traditionalist and an utter original.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is a sort of homecoming but not a return to basics. As these songs of experience prove, she’s grown far too much for this album to feel like anything but a fresh new chapter, even as it draws a connection to all the places she’s been.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though it may be her second consecutive album to lean heavily on metal, Hiss Spun deftly incorporates a diverse range of sounds.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Pervasive throughout is the sense that yearning for the unobtainable is its own reward, and the band successfully imbues Haiku from Zero with the notion that both pleasure and pain remind us that we’re alive.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Wonderful Wonderful finds them more comfortable in their own skin: They've managed to condense their operatic impulses into an album of tight, relatively low-key pop songs.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like the rest of Pink's catalogue, the hooks here can be elusive, buried amid a cornucopia of silly voices, hyperactive genre pastiche, and murky production values. But when they land, they land hard. ... It's that roughness around the edges that makes Dedicated to Bobby Jameson so deeply resonating.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They're a little more mature, a little tighter, but just as virile, and definitely not just cashing in.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Danilova's music is often at its best when her powerful voice complements the gloomy arrangements rather than towers over them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    When Amos eschews her band in favor of barer piano-and-vocal arrangements—as on the contemplative “Breakaway,” the surprisingly reverent “Climb,” and the lush “Mary's Eyes,” a mournful plea to the gods to reverse Amos's mother's aphasia--Native Invader fulfills the promise of its stunning opener.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Omnion is polished, precise, and familiar-sounding, but it's also indelibly soulful. It recalls the discotheque's formative role as sweaty, secular alternative church.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There are only a few uptempo cuts here, but unlike on the band's last few releases, each of them propels the album forward.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As far as reunion albums by aging bands go, this one is about as gratifyingly unpredictable as anyone could have hoped for. American Dream is notably more rock-oriented than its predecessors.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If anything, Villains could have used more overt pop influences, as it may have resulted in more delightfully wild experiments like the closing “Villains of Circumstance,” whose sulking verses contrast with sweeping, glitzy choruses to suggest Michael Bolton as a deranged Weimar-era cabaret singer.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There isn't a moment on Invitation where it sounds like they aren't having fun, and their good time spills over into a dozen songs that are textured, tuneful, and immediate,
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The sneaky-sounding arpeggios and the hushed, fragile vocal performances that defined albums like Our Endless Numbered Days are eschewed in favor of bright strumming and unbridled joyousness, rendering most of Beast Epic undeniably pretty but ultimately toothless. That's not to say Beast Epic doesn't sometimes explore hefty themes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    None of the songs covered on Not Dark Yet really count as obscurities, but Moorer and Lynne's interpretations are loaded with surprises and packed with personal conviction.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album's lyrics, however, can't match this same level of musical precision, and Granduciel too often repeats the same vague sentiments using threadbare imagery.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it might not be the discovery of a new talent, it's certainly the deepening of an existing one—another in a long line of female pop stars initially given limited creative and professional agency now intent on exploding the patriarchy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    TFCF lacks the forceful unity of the best Liars albums, particularly the thoughtful avant-garde theatrics of They Were Wrong So We Drowned and Drum's Not Dead. The songs here function more like a series of half-developed sketches, often invigorating but a tad shambolic, the lyrics' cryptic nature failing to connect with any coherent central thesis.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Painted Ruins stops short of fearlessly exploring new musical terrain, instead content to approach the familiar from new angles.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Road, Pt 1 thrives in its quiet, contemplative moments, which break new ground for Unkle, even as Lavelle touches on a more familiar sound with thrumming numbers like the trip-hop-infused “Arm’s Length.”
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If “maturity” isn't quite the word for Flower Boy, however, the album is nevertheless a significant milestone. This is easily Tyler's most emotionally risky, and rewarding, work to date--and, in its own way, more transgressive than anything from Odd Future's punk-rap peak.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is by far Arcade Fire's most upbeat and easily digestible album to date.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For anyone who thinks Cooper's music has lost its edge, Paranormal is a reminder that loud, lumbering rock never goes out of style.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In something of a seismic shift for the usually downcast artist, the constant of the songwriting here is a buoying faith in the power of love, and all the many forms it can take: romantic (“Love”), carnal (“Cherry”), platonic (“Coachella”), effusively adulatory (“Groupie Love”), fetishistic (“White Mustang”), and, yes, self-loving (“In My Feelings”).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Everything on Goodnight Rhonda Lee is immediate. Throughout, Atkins’s lyrics eschew metaphor in favor of a more confessional mode, and her arrangements are punchy and direct.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's not a wasted moment on this rare Jay-Z album that's too taut and focused for crossover singles or distractions from its central thesis. He takes 4:44 seriously but doesn't forget to have fun along on the way.