Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,502 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Ys
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
2502 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    LP1
    LP1 is more than just a confident debut album. It's primordial in a way that Björk herself has often attempted but frequently short-circuited letting her cognizance get in the way.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A raucous self-celebration, full of scrappy beat poetry leavened with dark-edged Americana influences, Nelson Algren-style urban malaise, and off-kilter, strangely instrumentalized songs.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Occasionally, the more ambitious nature of Everything Is 4 reveals some of Derulo's weaknesses, like his insistence on indulging straight R&B (which feels basic compared to the unique mode of genre-bending he usually works in), but stretching musically also leads to arguably the most exciting moment here, the funk rave-up of album-closer "X2CU."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combining a driving beat with melancholy vocals may not exactly be anything new in pop music, but the juxtaposition of the two here elicits an entrancing state more conducive to impassioned swaying than outright dancing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though it may not fit comfortably alongside any other albums in Wilco's catalogue, Sky Blue Sky is further confirmation that, even at their most retro, they're among contemporary pop music's most vital acts.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    True Love Kills the Fairy Tale flourishes in the complex tension between the Greenes' mellifluous vocal harmonies, their jarring, amorphous lyrics, and the haunted-house dream pop in which both are encased.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In terms of the number of classic, summer-ready Minogue singles on hand, Kiss Me Once is pretty much par for the course. But there's an element of that that makes it better than your typical Minogue album, in that it's not content with pleasing the people on the dance floor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He certainly has our attention.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For Obsidian, Wiesenfeld has simply stripped off the top layer of fluff to expose the raw pathos beneath his work. It is, as a result, a much more thematic and personal effort.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is brainy, energizing stuff, and sometimes (such as on "Just Begun," where Kweli trades sharp bars with J. Cole, Jay Electronica, and Mos Def over a beautiful sax loop), it hits like lightning.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is at its best when its space is utilized not to build additional patterns, but to simply frame the raw nature and intrinsic beauty of sound.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a remarkable exploration of self--an undoubtedly personal album, packed with a sense of history, circumstance, opportunity, love, and fleeting memories.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Prior to this album, Segall was most notable for his music's exciting collision of manic energy and technical skill. Here he retains those basics while demonstrating a keener focus on song construction and mechanics, the work of an artist who's still intent on tearing things up, but possesses a newly lucid understanding of how to shape interesting music out of the remnants.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    None of the songs covered on Not Dark Yet really count as obscurities, but Moorer and Lynne's interpretations are loaded with surprises and packed with personal conviction.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On The Hum, this delicate balancing act between abrasive aggression and unfettered tunefulness positions Hookworms as an uncompromising experimental act with festival-sized ambitions, capable of synthesizing disparate and often contradictory sounds into a cohesive and compelling whole.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    West is the rare artist who can turn a cry for attention into something more: a distillation of his artistic output to date that is quintessentially Kanye, whether you like him or not.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Something could end up a strong and satisfying default listen for forward-thinking pop fans.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bigger, louder, and more eclectic works well on Bad Self Portraits, but smaller, quieter, and more precise was what made the band's earlier efforts so distinctive.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Williams has assembled many guest musicians this time around, but despite all the disparate talent, the album is a tight, coherent work that never devolves into self-indulgent jamming, even at an epic 103 minutes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dylan leaves it to his unique vocals and a smoking set of sidemen to get his point across.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Who needs 18 tracks? The shorter format leaves you wanting more, which is the desired effect of the first plate in any three-course meal.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What makes Poison Season a great album, though, is that it doesn't completely wallow in Bejar's newfound smoking-jacket-and-fine-brandy sophistication—as opposed to the tattered-plaid-shirt-and-fifth-of-Jack wildness of early Destroyer. Rather, refined balladry like "Solace's Bride" coexists comfortably next to upbeat, funky songs like "Midnight Meet the Rain," which sounds like the badass theme song for an '80s cop show.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sun
    A collection of songs that represent a dynamic snapshot of the singer-songwriter in steady command of her craft while still occasionally giving way to passages of thin-skinned, deeply revealing storytelling.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Conceptually, Entanglements has been done before, but lyrics are reprised and musical sentences are repeated in such a way that it creates a singularly cohesive, linear narrative piece.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band has delivered something even better here: an elegantly simple, aggressive album that understands and acknowledges its own past without nostalgia or bloat.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Instead of begging to be repeated, the rest of the album's songs are best savored as a whole--a weird assessment of an R&B album, which usually sink or swim on their ability to capture you right away.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The usual thrill of a live album comes from slightly tweaked familiarity, but Waits treats his songs like old cars in need of new engines. It's a decision that's ultimately more rewarding, turning Glitter and Doom into an album that basically amounts to 80 minutes of new material.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More than any of his previous albums, Prisoner of Conscious is the sound of Kweli performing art for art's sake, hip-hop for the sake of hip-hop, with hardly a homily to be found.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fortunately for Griffin, the album boasts perhaps her finest performances to date, making Church an essential addition to her rich catalogue and a rewarding step in her ongoing emergence as more than just a go-to writer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What Easy Tiger lacks in craft or measure, it makes up for in raw inspiration, which makes it all the more addictive.