Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,623 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Hard to Be a God
Lowest review score: 0 Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace
Score distribution:
2,623 movie reviews
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Michael Connors does a fine job of not passing judgment on his characters, yet his depiction of his main character's dilemma is about the only thing he handles correctly.
  1. Generally, these shorts do little to advance their own arguments, but then again, they don't need to; if the short film is the arena of students, amateurs, and small-timers, then these are overdogs from frame one, coming off every bit as expensive and banal as their makers allow them to be.
  2. The Good Doctor isn't a ponderous bore because Blake isn't a strictly good or bad character: It sucks because he isn't even a compelling character.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    The film seems almost to have been produced spontaneously, by gears of a larger system as they mesh together right this instant, culled from the ether with the words "Customers Who Also Liked Dogtooth and Winter's Bone Liked This…"
  3. Purports to tell the true story of the titular imprisoned, controversially outspoken death-penalty opponent, but eventually degenerates into an orgy of congratulation.
  4. There's plenty of gore, but none of it is particularly inventive, nor does it engender any visceral or emotional reactions beyond jaded disgust.
  5. The film walks a questionable line between Important Issue seriousness and antsy video-game machismo.
  6. The filmmakers bite off far more than they're able to chew, resulting in an odd blend of touched-upon topics.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Tonally, Parker's not so much broad or inclusive as weirdly schizophrenic, vacillating between flat comedy and spiked savagery, the product of a painfully slapdash script that also includes such laughable incidental dialogue as "pizza-I love that sh.t" and "beers and jewels, baby."
  7. There's something about these films, something about the working-over these songs suffer--a wrongness that's intangible but inescapable, like the unseen menace of a bad dream.
  8. Maybe Battle Royale's ultimate punchline is its inexplicable ability to fool some people into taking it seriously.
  9. Moussa Touré's worldview, like Ousmane Sembene's, is characterized by the feeling that, at the end of the day, some degree of loss or defeat is inevitable.
  10. Debbie Goodstein-Rosenfeld's film seems oddly anemic when it deals with anyone but Chazz Palminteri's Joe.
  11. In the end, considering the numerous ways the film goes limp, it seems credibility still eludes the found-footage genre.
  12. Down the Shore suggests what might happen if TBS and Bruce Springsteen were to collaborate on a sitcom set in hell.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    A surprisingly shapeless true-crime farce which never creates a convincing context for the odd relationship between a pious East Texas mortician and his sugar mama.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    The doc doesn't take the time to examine why Burning Man inspires such a level of fanaticism, overshadowing human interest with a gluttony of B roll.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Feels like one of those thin, audio-visual supplements on an artist that you casually view as you browse a gallery show.
  13. The film is reduced to a series of unfunny mockery laid out so Garlin can display his trademark deadpan reaction.
  14. Ken Urban, adapting his own play, fumbles at injections of urban, and decidedly not urbane, levity, in addition to telegraphing entire subplots.
  15. It adds up to a methodically bland, intellectually sluggish exercise in guilt-tripping that's nonetheless still more interested in its rich and sexy characters than the supposed unfortunates.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Unlike Pamela Tanner Boll's truly inquisitive "Who Does She Think She Is?", which delves deeply and personally into the lives of a handful of working artist moms, Hershman Leeson introduces us only superficially to her dozens of pioneering friends.
  16. Like many films that contrast the simplicity of a rural community against the confusion of city life, The Grand Seduction exhibits a patriarchal, xenophobic attitude.
  17. The premise of faith-based assisted suicide as a motivating factor for a madman's killing spree is initially intriguing, but quickly revealed as solemn window dressing.
  18. The film abounds in excruciatingly obvious, often precious, articulations of grief, where armchair philosophizing volleys back and forth with punishing abandon.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    It may suggest an Alien incarnate, but once you get past its exterior, it's as empty as outer space.
  19. It's sense of complexity is giving us masses of people moved by Simon Bolívar's words, and gorgeous sweeping vistas of the landscape backed by a stirring orchestra.
  20. An art-house con destined to make viewers who've ever used the term "mindfuck" as praise rack their brains trying to come up with alternate readings for a film that invites many but convincingly offers none.
  21. Oh, the things that money can buy.
  22. The film suggests an ineffectual mishmash of Ruby Sparks-ish high concept and modern Elizabethan comedy.

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